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"War Symphonies"


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Author Topic: "War Symphonies"  (Read 1771 times)
Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2013, 02:02:37 am »

Boyko
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kyjo
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« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2013, 03:56:28 am »

Indeed, a sizeable amount of symphonies were produced in the Stalinist era during WWII. Not all of them avoid banality, of course! Grin
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kyjo
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« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2013, 07:30:16 am »

Another one is Sauguet's epic Symphony no. 1 Expiatoire.
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suffolkcoastal
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« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2013, 10:49:11 am »

Though Vaughan Williams' 6th is mentioned in the list, it was his 5th that was completed during WWII in 1943.
The first 5 Martinu Symphonies are 1942-6
Roy Harris Symphonies 5 & 6, the 5th dedicated to the armed forces of the USSR and the 6th dedicated to the armed forces of the USA. His 4th 'Folksong' though mainly written just before the USA entered WWII was performed a lot during the war years and considered 'Patriotic'.
Also Leonard Bernstein's 1st Symphony 'Jeremiah'.
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2013, 01:26:51 pm »


Symphonies on Great Patrioctic War were produced also in 1953-91 USSR and in Russia nowadays
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2013, 02:03:58 am »

If I recall correctly someone once observed the contrast between the number of symphonies whose inspiration derived from the experience of war between 1939 and 1945 and those composed during or shortly afterwards and influenced by the First World War.

Again, if I recall correctly, comparatively few symphonies were composed during the years 1914-1918. (I am happy to be corrected naturally!)

If one considers the British composers active at the time of the First World War it is difficult to think of symphonies composed during the years of war-Stanford's 7th(1911-12), Parry's 5th(1912), Elgar's 2nd(1909-10), McEwen's Solway(1911), Tovey's Symphony(1913) all date from immediately before the war. Bantock's Hebridean was written in 1915 and Thomas Dunhill's Symphony between 1913 and 1916 but neither appears to bear any relation to the fact of war.

In the post war years, clearly RVW's Pastoral Symphony was very much a reflection on his experiences in France during the Great War and Bliss's Choral Symphony "Morning Heroes" is testimony to the loss of the composer's brother in the trenches in France. "Mars" from Holst's "Planets Suite" is very evidently influenced by war as is Elgar's "The Spirit of England". John Foulds wrote his "World Requiem" at the end of the war. It seems remarkable however how many composers fell comparatively silent during the war or produced
short patriotic pieces.

From the non-combatant nations I cannot but think that Carl Nielsen's Symphony No.4 "The Inextinguishable" is a reflection on the conflict going on beyond the frontiers of Denmark. Miaskovsky in Russia was deeply affected by the war on the Eastern Front.


.........just some random thoughts.
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albert
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« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2013, 09:44:47 am »

Villa-Lobos  was strongly affected by WW1 and dedicated no less than three Symphonies: n.3, n.4 "Vitoria" and n.5 (if I recall well, rated to be lost).
Much connected (even programmatic) to WW1 is d'Indy Symphonia Brevis (n.3) "De Bello Gallico"; actually not so short, at about thirty minutes.
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kyjo
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« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2013, 03:46:41 pm »

I know it's not a symphony, but Casella's poignant, defiant Elegia eroica is a tribute to the victims of WWI.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #23 on: October 13, 2013, 05:52:49 pm »

Gordon Jacob's Symphony No.1 is dedicated to the memory of his brother who died on the Somme. The slow movement is a funeral march and is, presumably, directly related to the composer's brother.
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Wheesht
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« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2013, 06:35:16 pm »

There is the "Wartime Music" series on the Northern Flowers label - I have Volume 5 with the first symphony by Mieczyslaw Weinberg from 1942 (according to the liner notes, it wasn't performed until 1967, by the Mosco Philharmonic under the baton of Kirill kondrashin).
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kyjo
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« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2013, 06:48:14 pm »

There is the "Wartime Music" series on the Northern Flowers label - I have Volume 5 with the first symphony by Mieczyslaw Weinberg from 1942 (according to the liner notes, it wasn't performed until 1967, by the Mosco Philharmonic under the baton of Kirill kondrashin).

Indeed! Another one from the "Wartime Music" series is Mosolov's powerful Symphony in E.
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2013, 11:03:39 pm »

There is the "Wartime Music" series on the Northern Flowers label - I have Volume 5 with the first symphony by Mieczyslaw Weinberg from 1942 (according to the liner notes, it wasn't performed until 1967, by the Mosco Philharmonic under the baton of Kirill kondrashin).

Indeed! Another one from the "Wartime Music" series is Mosolov's powerful Symphony in E.
I appreciate greatly also Yevlakhov and Knipper in this series

lesser level Kochurov
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chill319
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« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2013, 02:44:04 am »

Barber symphony 2 is very much a war symphony, and a strong one IMO.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2013, 01:38:48 am »

I don't think Myaskovsky's 20th and 21st symphonies apply, given the specific situation surrounding Russia, which was attacked by June of 1941. Myaskovsky responded to it with his Symphony no. 22 and its language and expressive mode reflect that.

Good point! His 24th and 25th are definitely his major "war symphonies". The slow movement of the 24th is a deeply moving tribute to the fallen.
Mia's powerful 6th has definite military undertones..
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2013, 04:08:26 am »

You can hear Janus Ciker's compelling, turbulent and unheralded war statement here..
Symphony 1945
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/51451
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