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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14719 times)
Neil McGowan
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« Reply #390 on: January 17, 2014, 09:48:14 pm »

I'm rehearing an opera by the C17th Hamburg-based composer Johann Georg Conradi - from the generation there which preceded Handel's and Matthesson's arrival at the Goosemarket Opera.  This one is ARIADNE, and it's mesmerisingly beautiful music Smiley  There is a much higher proportion of recitativo to arias than in operas by Handel or Keiser - the arias are almost a rare treat.  And there is some beautiful ballet and processional music Smiley

Must try to get a score of this!! Smiley

Edit: We've just had a comic aria accompanied by a bassoon quartet! (Altoon, Tenoroon, Bassoon, Contra-Bassoon). I was nearly crying with laughter as these poor guys attempted to keep modern copies of these ancient instruments in tune Smiley  Although I suspect Conradi was somewhat hoping for a grotesque moment in any case...
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kyjo
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« Reply #391 on: January 18, 2014, 01:36:40 am »

I cannot but echo your words about Tubin 1-surely one of the most impressive premier symphonies by any composer. The first movement, especially, is simply inspiring.

Heise's PQ is a highly original and hugely enjoyable work. I was expecting it to be standard mid-romantic chamber fare influenced by Schumann and Brahms but, boy, was I wrong! It's a shame Heise didn't write more because he clearly had an individual talent.

I recently listened to Hovhaness 22 as well. The finale has a Brucknerian breadth which can be quite awe-inspiring if handled effectively.
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dhibbard
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« Reply #392 on: January 18, 2014, 03:48:59 am »

I tend to listen to new-to-me compositions multiple times, being a bit slow. The last two days I've been marvelling over and over at Tubin's Symphony 1, as performed by the Estonian National Symphony under Volmer. The musical materials are quasi-modal -- dorian, generally -- and thus contain less contrast (or highlights) than later works by Tubin. But what he does with them is remarkable. A born symphonist, unlike any other. 

yes.... I would have to agree... I also like the first movement of Sym #3... esp. on the drive into work going 80mph/100km on the "tollway or turnpike" as some call it in Texas.
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #393 on: January 18, 2014, 06:49:01 am »

I listened to the Marco Polo/da capo release of Ludolf Nielsen's second symphony earlier this evening.  Now I'm listening to the recent Naxos release of John Knowles Paine's music...specifically the Tempest suite at the moment.  Pleasantly inoffensive music, if a bit boring in both cases.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #394 on: January 20, 2014, 06:48:12 am »

I find the music of Aulis Salinen of Finland to be a mixed bag and a bit quirky. But much of it good, and when it is good, it is very excellent.
Tonite a heard his Horn Concerto, which was as enjoyable as horn concertos can be
followed by the dour but effective 8th symphony(is that a death rattle I hear?)
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/44777
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/44768
my favorite Sallinen work is Shadows:
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/28110
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #395 on: January 20, 2014, 01:57:05 pm »

Though I find Vermeulen's work more exciting than Hendrik Andriessen's, the latter wrote great music, and is worth time listening. His beautiful Variations on a theme of Kuhnau and the Miroir de Peine, as well as his Chromatic Variations I like.

Louis Andriessen's work is not for me!
The other son, Jurriaan, is somehere in between the two and was quite popular in the Netherlands in the later 70s and in the 80s of last century. His Psalms-Trilogy (mr. Clive?) is also worth to give it your time.

Ah...thanks, Mr. Roelof. Not sure if that's going to spring up from somewhere on the net, but will store the name in case !
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Clive
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« Reply #396 on: January 21, 2014, 12:24:44 am »

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the Marco Polo/da capo release of Ludolf Nielsen's second symphony ...
That performance introduced the symphony to me. The CPO recording has a stronger performing ensemble. Re Paine, I appreciate his seriousness of purpose and finished style, which raised the bar for U.S. composers in the 1860s and '70s. In terms of center (German-speaking lands) and periphery, every composer who works in societies with little taste for classical music is, of course, at a disadvantage. In Paine's case, a comparison with the somewhat earlier Berwald shows the Swedish composer to good advantage, regardless of how long he managed a sawmill.

Regarding my description of Tubin 1 as modal/dorain... what was I smoking when I wrote that?? The symphony can scarcely be called modal in any sense that would allow VW's heartbreaking symphony 3 to be called modal.

My first exposure to Tubin was Symphony 3, and it remains a favorite.
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #397 on: January 21, 2014, 09:01:00 pm »

Re Paine, I appreciate his seriousness of purpose and finished style, which raised the bar for U.S. composers in the 1860s and '70s.

Paine...has his flaws, I'll admit.  But I love him as much for what he represents as for what he was.  He had a great deal of talent, but I admire him most especially for what he did for the future of American music. 

Just finished listening to the Naxos release of Goffredo Petrassi's orchestral music, with the Partita - quite attractive stuff, for the most part.  Speaking of "attractive", I'm now listening to the Ignatz Waghalter violin concerto.  Very lovely.
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Gauk
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« Reply #398 on: January 22, 2014, 10:31:13 pm »

The other day I listened on the train to the Pfitzner Piano Concerto ... very strange. Definitely to be heard if nothing else for the third movement scherzo, which features some quite bizarre staccato brass writing.
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chill319
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« Reply #399 on: January 23, 2014, 11:48:37 pm »

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I admire him most especially for what he did for the future of American music

Me too. However, I think you'll agree that "American music" is quintessentially pop music, which is why Ives (ragtimes) and Gershwin (blues) and Copland (hicks Wink ) are (among others) performed more than Paine.
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #400 on: January 24, 2014, 08:00:01 am »

you'll agree that "American music" is quintessentially pop music, which is why Ives (ragtimes) and Gershwin (blues) and Copland (hicks Wink )


Really?  Wink





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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #401 on: January 24, 2014, 09:20:20 am »

Listened to this fine tonal music at the Canadian Radio website:
Twomey, Ray - Marlborough overture Op.7 1962
Calgary Youth Orchestra ; John Thompson, conductor.
Premiered April 4, 1998, Mt. Royal College, Calgary, AB
http://www.musiccentre.ca/node/31095

Twomey, Ray - Sinfonia Op.11a 1997
Kensington Sinfonia; Edmond Agopian, conductor.
St. Michael's Hall, Canmore, AB,
http://www.musiccentre.ca/node/31432

If you enjoy the music of New Zealand's Douglas Lilburn, and Vaughan Williams, this will appeal to you
as what I heard is somewhat derivative. Twomey was born in England in 1938, migrated to New Zealand during the war, and later
to Canada 1965
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chill319
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« Reply #402 on: January 26, 2014, 11:54:41 pm »

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I admire [Paine] most especially for what he did for the future of American music...
Well expressed, and exactly my sentiments. For some reason that may be entirely unsupportable, I've long seen Parker's best works as the fulfillment of Paine's promise.
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #403 on: January 27, 2014, 01:58:36 am »

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I admire [Paine] most especially for what he did for the future of American music...
Well expressed, and exactly my sentiments. For some reason that may be entirely unsupportable, I've long seen Parker's best works as the fulfillment of Paine's promise.


Parker is a composer with whom I have wrestled considerably.  I've listened to a few things - Hora Novissima, the organ concerto, and the piano trio are the largest of the pieces that I know - and more often than not I find his to be a promise unfulfilled.  The first two I've given a couple of tries, and they never really work for me.  The piano trio is a different matter, and I love it dearly.  In college I sang an excerpt from his late oratorio The Legend of St. Christopher, and found it to be immensely powerful.  I know a handful of his smaller works, too, but they're of less consequence.

Frankly, I've always preferred Chadwick.  At its best his music is greatly characterful and quite approachable.  And I see him, as much as Parker, as a natural heir to Paine's school of orchestral thinking, as it were.  The neglect of most American music by the mainstream orchestras today is shameful; in Chadwick's case I would argue that it rises to near-criminal levels.
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dhibbard
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« Reply #404 on: January 27, 2014, 04:40:39 am »

some Podkovyrov... Symphony no 5...  and Atterberg.... and Ivanov's Sym #8
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