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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14627 times)
SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #330 on: December 27, 2013, 10:33:17 pm »

Indeed! Borresen was a minor composer; his music is enjoyable but doesn't have much staying power. That said, there are many good things to be found in his Symphony no. 1 and VC. Atterberg, on the other hand, had a masterful command of the orchestra and poured his heart into all of his music, producing glorious results. His 2nd and 3rd symphonies are my favorites as well, along with the 5th. I agree with you about the 3rd-the finale in particular is so deeply overwhelming that it can bring tears to my eyes Smiley Only very special music can achieve that Smiley

Alright, alright, I get the message...I'll buy it.  Grin

Is the cpo release worth getting?  That's the box set I found on Amazon.
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kyjo
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« Reply #331 on: December 27, 2013, 10:58:31 pm »

Is the cpo release worth getting?  That's the box set I found on Amazon.

I thought we already established that the CPO set of Atterberg's complete symphonies is an essential part of any classical music lover's collection Grin
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chill319
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« Reply #332 on: December 27, 2013, 11:38:59 pm »

No question: Atterberg has more to say about our complex society than Borresen, who was happy if his works compared favorably to those of his late-19th-century mentors Grieg, Svendsen, and Tchaikovsky. Atterberg addressed courageously the more difficult realities of the 20th century that we grew up in. (Borresen remains treasurable for his sincerity and freshness.) My Christmas present to myself was the Arno Volmer-led performances of Tubin. I am astonished again and again by these Symphonies and these recordings. The first 8 are on a very high level indeed (and I stop at 8 only because I haven't heard 9, and 10 is a bit too predictable for me.)
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kyjo
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« Reply #333 on: December 27, 2013, 11:59:39 pm »

My Christmas present to myself was the Arno Volmer-led performances of Tubin. I am astonished again and again by these Symphonies and these recordings. The first 8 are on a very high level indeed (and I stop at 8 only because I haven't heard 9, and 10 is a bit too predictable for me.)

Agreed about the greatness of the Tubin symphonies. How do Volmer's recordings compare to Jarvi's? (I should really stop asking this question and get the recordings myself Roll Eyes)
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #334 on: December 28, 2013, 12:37:57 am »

My Christmas present to myself was the Arno Volmer-led performances of Tubin. I am astonished again and again by these Symphonies and these recordings. The first 8 are on a very high level indeed (and I stop at 8 only because I haven't heard 9, and 10 is a bit too predictable for me.)

Agreed about the greatness of the Tubin symphonies. How do Volmer's recordings compare to Jarvi's? (I should really stop asking this question and get the recordings myself Roll Eyes)
By both! If you end up selling the Big Issue outside Tesco don't worry,you won't be on your own! I'll be thinking of you in the comfort of my lovely,warm home! Grin
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kyjo
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« Reply #335 on: December 28, 2013, 12:59:14 am »

.....and you will be the CEO of the Holbrooke Foundation and still ask me for donations to fund recordings of his music Grin
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dhibbard
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« Reply #336 on: December 28, 2013, 01:06:28 am »

My Christmas present to myself was the Arno Volmer-led performances of Tubin. I am astonished again and again by these Symphonies and these recordings. The first 8 are on a very high level indeed (and I stop at 8 only because I haven't heard 9, and 10 is a bit too predictable for me.)

Agreed about the greatness of the Tubin symphonies. How do Volmer's recordings compare to Jarvi's? (I should really stop asking this question and get the recordings myself Roll Eyes)

Yes they are wonderful!!.... Volmer puts some umfff  into the performances!!
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kyjo
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« Reply #337 on: December 28, 2013, 01:14:37 am »

My mind is telling me yes, my wallet is telling me no Grin
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kyjo
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« Reply #338 on: December 28, 2013, 04:01:50 am »

Starting off tonight's listening with Maxwell Davies' Symphony no. 1. I can't say I was too terribly impressed with it (it's not one of PMD's best works), but it has some interesting (and occasionally haunting) moments, such as the opening of the third movement with its prominent role for a high-pitched timpani. It's a long work (55 mins.) and my attention did wander in spots, mainly because the work is so devoid of traditional symphonic structure and development and has little for me to "latch onto". PMD's fondness for mallet instruments (esp. vibraphone) is interesting for a while, but it eventually becomes rather commonplace due to overuse. I didn't dislike the piece, but I don't see myself returning to it anytime soon. His Third Symphony, while still rather overlong, had a greater effect on me.

Would it be appropriate to dub PMD a "modern-day Bax"? The rhapsodic, discursive nature of his music, as well as its suggestions of the craggy English coastline, links him with Sir Arnold. Now, of course, their harmonic languages are quite dissimilar. Just a thought!
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dhibbard
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« Reply #339 on: December 28, 2013, 04:09:32 am »

what do you think of Auster's Suite from the Ballet Tiina??
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kyjo
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« Reply #340 on: December 28, 2013, 04:31:01 am »

Haven't listened to it yet, but will report back when I do. I loved Auster's beautiful PC!
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dhibbard
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« Reply #341 on: December 28, 2013, 04:33:20 am »

just posted it on the Estonian downloads section....
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kyjo
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« Reply #342 on: December 28, 2013, 05:07:40 am »

Previously, listened to Britten's Quartettino (Maggini Qt/Naxos), an astonishingly assured work for a sixteen-year-old. Its harmonic language is quite forward-looking (rather Bartokian in spots), but there are also spots where it shows the young composer was familiar with the music of the impressionists. A case in point is the captivating, magical ending of the slow movement.

Also, gave a maiden listen to Joseph Martin Kraus' (an almost exact contemporary of Mozart) music: his Symphony in C major, VB 138. It is a highly enjoyable work featuring a prominent obbligato part for a solo violin. Also, the slow movement has a beautiful cello solo. The work is remarkable for managing to avoid imitating the styles of Haydn or Mozart and is harmonically advanced for its time.
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kyjo
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« Reply #343 on: December 28, 2013, 05:53:42 am »

Rounding out tonight's listening with Hovhaness' Cello Concerto, one of the few early works of his he chose not to discard. The solo part is decidedly non-virtuosic, and nearly the whole work is at a slow tempo, but it really is a beautiful work. Oriental modes permeate the entire work, especially in the solo cello's haunting ruminations. The brass chorales that keep recurring are quite stirring (great rhyme Grin) and the majestic ending is built off them.
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Gauk
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« Reply #344 on: December 28, 2013, 08:55:48 am »

Starting off tonight's listening with Maxwell Davies' Symphony no. 1. I can't say I was too terribly impressed with it (it's not one of PMD's best works), but it has some interesting (and occasionally haunting) moments, such as the opening of the third movement with its prominent role for a high-pitched timpani. It's a long work (55 mins.) and my attention did wander in spots, mainly because the work is so devoid of traditional symphonic structure and development and has little for me to "latch onto". PMD's fondness for mallet instruments (esp. vibraphone) is interesting for a while, but it eventually becomes rather commonplace due to overuse. I didn't dislike the piece, but I don't see myself returning to it anytime soon. His Third Symphony, while still rather overlong, had a greater effect on me.

Max's 1st doesn't work. It is intended to play with tempo in the manner of Sibelius, but because of the lack of rhythmic clarity, this effect is lost on the listener. The 3rd is a much more successful piece - but sinister!
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