The Art-Music Forum
May 19, 2019, 10:13:28 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Here you may discover hundreds of little-known composers, hear thousands of long-forgotten compositions, contribute your own rare (non-copyright) recordings, and discuss all the Arts in an erudite and decorous atmosphere full of freedom and delight. To participate, simply log in or register.
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

What are you currently listening to?


Pages: 1 ... 20 21 [22] 23 24 ... 46   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14719 times)
guest54
Guest
« Reply #315 on: December 24, 2013, 04:33:01 am »

. . . The opening of the First is indeed absolutely marvellous . . .

As a youth, getting to know things, I longed to hear this concerto for about a year. Finally I heard it live, performed by Hephzibah Menuhin. An unforgettable occasion!
Report Spam   Logged
cjvinthechair
Level 6
******

Times thanked: 49
Offline Offline

Posts: 839



View Profile
« Reply #316 on: December 25, 2013, 08:57:35 am »

Karolju - Christopher Rouse...the best way to wake a household on Christmas morn - and a happy day to all !
Report Spam   Logged

Clive
SerAmantiodiNicolao
Level 3
***

Times thanked: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 147



View Profile
« Reply #317 on: December 25, 2013, 08:23:47 pm »

I'm listening to one of my Christmas presents - Maria Golovin by Menotti.  So far I like it - it's not his best work, but there's a lot of good material in it I find.

Listened earlier today to Brahms' PC 2 with Gilels/Jochum. I'd forgotten how much I loved this work. I actually prefer the second PC by some distance to the first PC, with the exception of the menacing opening of the latter. PC 1 seems to have too much note-spinning.

I love both of the Brahms piano concertos, but for different reasons.  The first is a stunner, but it's more of a symphony-with-obbligato than a true concerto.  My own favorite performance is that Glenn Gould gave with the NY Phil under Bernstein in the early 60's - I have it on disc.  He makes it a true give-and-take, rather than a virtuoso showpiece.

The second is a different matter altogether - I heard Emmanuel Ax play it with the National Symphony under Slatkin some years ago.
Report Spam   Logged
Gauk
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 56
Offline Offline

Posts: 1142



View Profile
« Reply #318 on: December 26, 2013, 09:48:24 am »

Having recently read Michael Haas's Forbidden Music about the fate of composers persecuted by the Nazis, I have been revisiting the Wellesz symphonies, of which I have the boxed set from CPO. And also Karl Weigl, very little of whose music seems to have been recorded. There is only one link in our downloads section here, to some songs.

Here's a nice quiz question: what links Weigl's 5th symphony with Shchedrin's 2nd Symphony, besides both being a reaction to WW2? They share something very uncommon.
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #319 on: December 27, 2013, 04:06:44 am »

Just finished listening to Raff's Symphony no. 2, performed by the Suisse Romande Orchestra under Jarvi. If deep, dark, serious music is what you seek, look elsewhere! This symphony overflows with buoyant energy (heightened by Jarvi's swift tempi) and flows along almost effortlessly, but what makes it especially enjoyable are the little harmonic and rhythmic twists that often foreshadow Dvorak. Raff's orchestration has a nicely "fresh" feel to it, setting him apart from some of his contemporaries (Schumann especially). Not an undiscovered masterpiece, but a work that certainly deserves an occasional airing!
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #320 on: December 27, 2013, 04:38:34 am »

Just finished up Rubbra's String Quartet no. 1, a strong work with two energetic, rhythmic outer movements surrounding a deeply felt slow movement which is an elegy on the death of Holst. This movement has a rather archaic atmosphere (e.g. the strumming cello chords bring to mind a lute) not uncommon in Rubbra's very rewarding music.
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #321 on: December 27, 2013, 04:45:37 am »

Here's a nice quiz question: what links Weigl's 5th symphony with Shchedrin's 2nd Symphony, besides both being a reaction to WW2? They share something very uncommon.

I'd have to refresh my memory of the Shchedrin, but I know the Weigl has an uncommon feature: the modernistic opening involves the orchestral tuning seguing directly into the actual work, a startling effect. (The remainder of the symphony is decidedly more conservative.) That seems like a device the often wacky Shchedrin would use in his music. If I'm incorrect, could you give us a hint please?
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #322 on: December 27, 2013, 05:47:31 am »

Rounding off tonight's listening session with a bit o' Atterberg, this time his First Symphony, an auspicious beginning to a symphonic cycle for the ages. The Scherzo is a whirlwind orchestral tour-de-force (Atterberg sure gives the winds a workout!) and the Finale progresses from an almost Bachian state of purity and calm in the opening to a grand, heroic theme in the horns that permeates the main section of the movement. Atterberg sure loves his bass clarinet-those solos give me chills!
Report Spam   Logged
SerAmantiodiNicolao
Level 3
***

Times thanked: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 147



View Profile
« Reply #323 on: December 27, 2013, 06:18:23 am »

Rounding off tonight's listening session with a bit o' Atterberg, this time his First Symphony, an auspicious beginning to a symphonic cycle for the ages. The Scherzo is a whirlwind orchestral tour-de-force (Atterberg sure gives the winds a workout!) and the Finale progresses from an almost Bachian state of purity and calm in the opening to a grand, heroic theme in the horns that permeates the main section of the movement. Atterberg sure loves his bass clarinet-those solos give me chills!

Hrmm...you're making me seriously consider sinking some of my new Amazon gift card into the cpo cycle of Atterberg symphonies.

Speaking of Scandinavia, I'm listening to another of my Christmas gifts, the first symphony of Hakon Børresen (also on cpo).  Quite lovely music - nice, meaty Romantic stuff so far.
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #324 on: December 27, 2013, 06:35:25 am »

GO ON! BUY IT! YOU WON'T REGRET IT! Grin

But seriously, please do consider that wonderful set! By looking at the Amazon reviews, you'll see I'm not the only one who hypes about Atterberg. If you enjoyed that Borresen symphony, I imagine Atterberg would be right up your street!
Report Spam   Logged
dhibbard
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 48
Offline Offline

Posts: 2037


View Profile
« Reply #325 on: December 27, 2013, 06:48:45 am »

same here !!..
Report Spam   Logged
Gauk
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 56
Offline Offline

Posts: 1142



View Profile
« Reply #326 on: December 27, 2013, 07:55:50 am »

Here's a nice quiz question: what links Weigl's 5th symphony with Shchedrin's 2nd Symphony, besides both being a reaction to WW2? They share something very uncommon.

I'd have to refresh my memory of the Shchedrin, but I know the Weigl has an uncommon feature: the modernistic opening involves the orchestral tuning seguing directly into the actual work, a startling effect. (The remainder of the symphony is decidedly more conservative.) That seems like a device the often wacky Shchedrin would use in his music. If I'm incorrect, could you give us a hint please?

You got it - both feature orchestral tuning as part of the music.
Report Spam   Logged
SerAmantiodiNicolao
Level 3
***

Times thanked: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 147



View Profile
« Reply #327 on: December 27, 2013, 03:16:27 pm »

GO ON! BUY IT! YOU WON'T REGRET IT! Grin

But seriously, please do consider that wonderful set! By looking at the Amazon reviews, you'll see I'm not the only one who hypes about Atterberg. If you enjoyed that Borresen symphony, I imagine Atterberg would be right up your street!

I see the reviews...I'm giving it serious consideration.  (For the record - I enjoyed the Borresen until the last movement, which I felt started to wander a bit.  Pity - I liked it very much up until there.)

I actually have some small passing familiarity with Atterberg - many years ago I purchased a Sterling disc with a couple of the concertos on it, and quite liked it.  But he's been off my radar for some while.
Report Spam   Logged
Gauk
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 56
Offline Offline

Posts: 1142



View Profile
« Reply #328 on: December 27, 2013, 07:45:46 pm »

Atterberg is a much more considerable figure than Borresen IMO. His 2nd and 3rd symphonies are my favourites; the 3rd in particular is one of those works so emotionally overpowering I can't listen to it too often.
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #329 on: December 27, 2013, 09:33:01 pm »

Atterberg is a much more considerable figure than Borresen IMO. His 2nd and 3rd symphonies are my favourites; the 3rd in particular is one of those works so emotionally overpowering I can't listen to it too often.

Indeed! Borresen was a minor composer; his music is enjoyable but doesn't have much staying power. That said, there are many good things to be found in his Symphony no. 1 and VC. Atterberg, on the other hand, had a masterful command of the orchestra and poured his heart into all of his music, producing glorious results. His 2nd and 3rd symphonies are my favorites as well, along with the 5th. I agree with you about the 3rd-the finale in particular is so deeply overwhelming that it can bring tears to my eyes Smiley Only very special music can achieve that Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

Pages: 1 ... 20 21 [22] 23 24 ... 46   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy