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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14719 times)
Elroel
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« Reply #300 on: December 14, 2013, 04:35:28 pm »

Since half an hour I listen to Simeon ten Holt's Horizon, for 4 piano's.

Most of the minimal music can not catch me. Even worse: irritates me.
Here Ten Holt, best known for his Canto Ostinato, creates a world that fascinates,although every couple of minutes I think to stop it, but I don't, so I still listen. The whole work takes a little over 3 hours. If your interested: they're on YT

Part I


Here you find part II


part III
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #301 on: December 15, 2013, 01:26:39 am »

I finished off a disc of Konstantin Iliev earlier today (eh...) after returning from the moviecast of the new Met production of Falstaff (another eh...), and put on some Kosovar orchestral music (as yet a mixed bag.)  But after dinner I set it aside in favour of the Decca reissue of the D'Oyly Carte issue of The Grand Duke, which in its LP form was one of the first things I listened to while a callow youth.  It's a piece I dearly love; even so, I had forgotten just what a fine piece of work it actually is.  It's my candidate for most unjustly maligned Gilbert and Sullivan, I think - chock-full of cracking good tunes, and a libretto which must rank among Gilbert's wryest works.  A fine way indeed to finish off a rainy Saturday evening.
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Elroel
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« Reply #302 on: December 15, 2013, 04:38:09 pm »

Agree with Jolly Roger on Kolodub's Symphony no. 4: very dramatic music.
Now listening to this 4th symphony. Must say I overlooked this one earlier.

BTW, also his symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 5, 9 and 11 are to be found on Classical-music-online.net





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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #303 on: December 15, 2013, 06:57:49 pm »

USA night (not the first !) :
Aaron Jay Kernis - Musica Celestis
Richard Toensing - Magnificat
Frank Ticheli - Symphony no. 2 (wind band).....incidentally, are those words we are allowed to mention here ?!
Gloria Coates - Cantata da Requiem
John Williams - 5 Sacred Trees Bassoon Concerto
Jeff Manookian - Requiem.

Sorry if that's disloyal to dear old England - just find USA music so much more diverse and approachable; happy to be shouted down....with evidence !
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Clive
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« Reply #304 on: December 15, 2013, 09:17:15 pm »

Speaking of the US, right now I'm listening to a two-disc set of organ music by Rheinberger, Guilmant, and their American pupils - Parker, Coerne, Chadwick, Sidney Homer, things of that ilk.  Quite pleasant listening, even if I'm not the biggest fan of listening to organ music on disc.
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« Reply #305 on: December 15, 2013, 10:25:39 pm »

USA night (not the first !) :
Aaron Jay Kernis - Musica Celestis
Richard Toensing - Magnificat
Frank Ticheli - Symphony no. 2 (wind band).....incidentally, are those words we are allowed to mention here ?!
Gloria Coates - Cantata da Requiem
John Williams - 5 Sacred Trees Bassoon Concerto
Jeff Manookian - Requiem.

Sorry if that's disloyal to dear old England - just find USA music so much more diverse and approachable; happy to be shouted down....with evidence !

No...I am not going to rise to that challenge Grin My only comment would be that there is an inevitability about American music being more diverse given the much more obvious cross-fertilization of so many different European, non-European and ethnic cultural traditions involved in the US.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #306 on: December 16, 2013, 08:57:16 am »

Agree with Jolly Roger on Kolodub's Symphony no. 4: very dramatic music.
Now listening to this 4th symphony. Must say I overlooked this one earlier.

BTW, also his symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 5, 9 and 11 are to be found on Classical-music-online.net


Symphony No.  9 ,Sensilis moderno is  simply overwhelming
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #307 on: December 19, 2013, 07:23:49 pm »

A Dutch evening - Jeppe Moulijn: 4 Sea Poems for Soprano & Orchestra
                          Johan de Meij: Lord of the Rings Symphony (wind band again - sacrilege!)
                          Joep Franssens: Magnificat
                          Tristan Keuris: Organ Concerto
and my favourite (still!) Alphons Diepenbrock: Hymne an die Nacht.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #308 on: December 19, 2013, 08:26:22 pm »

This is really a fine thread, picking up some great suggestions here.
Never heard this fine piece before.
This is a must-hear for Martin devotees  - from the St Paul Chamber Symphony site.
Vintage Martin but Spanish Dances??

http://content.thespco.org/music/compositions/three-dances-for-oboe-harp-string-quartet-and-string-orchestra-frank-martin/

Frank Martin - Three Dances for Oboe, Harp, String Quartet and String Orchestra  1970
st paul chamber symphony,Thomas Zehetmair, conductor
Heinz Holliger, oboe-Ursula Holliger, harp
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dhibbard
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« Reply #309 on: December 20, 2013, 06:20:21 am »





Published on Aug 24, 2012

Sergei Ivanovich Taneyev (Taneev or Taneiev) - Piano Concerto in E flat major
1. Allegro (E♭ major) 2. Andante funebre (E♭ minor)
[World Premiere]

Mikhail Voskresensky - piano

Moscow Symphony Orchestra
Conductor Vladimir Ziva
Great Hall of Moscow Conservartory
Live recording 25.05.1998

This video is taken from the private collection of Mikhail Voskresensky.

Taneyev graduated in 1875, the first student in the history of the Conservatory to win the gold medal both for composition and for performing (piano). He was also the first person ever to be awarded the Conservatory's Great Gold Medal; the second was Arseny Koreshchenko and the third was Sergei Rachmaninoff.That summer he travelled abroad with Rubinstein. That year he also made his debut as a concert pianist in Moscow playing the first piano concerto in D minor of Johannes Brahms, and would become known for his interpretations of Johann Sebastian Bach, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven. In March 1876 he toured Russia with violinist Leopold Auer.
Taneyev was also the soloist in the Moscow première of Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto in 1875. Tchaikovsky was clearly impressed by Taneyev's performance; he later asked Taneyev to be soloist in the Russian premiere of his Second Piano Concerto. (After Tchaikovsky's death, Taneyev also completed and premiered his Third Piano Concerto and Andante and Finale.
Taneyev attended Moscow University for a short time and was acquainted with outstanding Russian writers, including Ivan Turgenev and Mikhail Saltykov-Shchedrin. During his travels in Western Europe in 1876 and 1877, he met Émile Zola, Gustave Flaubert, César Franck and Camille Saint-Saëns amongst others.

When Tchaikovsky resigned from the Moscow Conservatory in 1878, Taneyev was appointed to teach harmony. He would later also teach piano and composition. He served as Director from 1885 to 1889, and continued teaching until 1905.[8] He had great influence as a teacher of composition. His pupils included Alexander Scriabin, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Reinhold Glière, Paul Juon, Julius Conus, and Nikolai Medtner. The polyphonic interweaves in the music of Rachmaninoff and Medtner stem directly from Taneyev's teaching. Scriabin, on the other hand, broke away from Taneyev's influence.

http://www.mikhailvoskresensky.com/

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btw  his piano playing is sloppy...

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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #310 on: December 20, 2013, 01:28:26 pm »

This is really a fine thread, picking up some great suggestions here.
Never heard this fine piece before.
This is a must-hear for Martin devotees  - from the St Paul Chamber Symphony site.
Vintage Martin but Spanish Dances??

http://content.thespco.org/music/compositions/three-dances-for-oboe-harp-string-quartet-and-string-orchestra-frank-martin/

Frank Martin - Three Dances for Oboe, Harp, String Quartet and String Orchestra  1970
st paul chamber symphony,Thomas Zehetmair, conductor
Heinz Holliger, oboe-Ursula Holliger, harp
Thank you, Mr. JR - YT has it, as so often ! Very pleasant.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #311 on: December 20, 2013, 05:02:45 pm »

This is really a fine thread, picking up some great suggestions here.
Never heard this fine piece before.
This is a must-hear for Martin devotees  - from the St Paul Chamber Symphony site.
Vintage Martin but Spanish Dances??

http://content.thespco.org/music/compositions/three-dances-for-oboe-harp-string-quartet-and-string-orchestra-frank-martin/

Frank Martin - Three Dances for Oboe, Harp, String Quartet and String Orchestra  1970
st paul chamber symphony,Thomas Zehetmair, conductor
Heinz Holliger, oboe-Ursula Holliger, harp
Thank you, Mr. JR - YT has it, as so often ! Very pleasant.
Yes, YT does have plenty. Martin's fabulous String Etudes are also at St Paul and the audio qualiy at site may be better, you can browse the site for some more rarities.
http://content.thespco.org/music/composers/
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #312 on: December 22, 2013, 08:34:15 pm »

If you have missed this composer and his music, you have missed some exceptional music.
And what could be more appropriate for the Christmas Holiday than a Prayer Song?
(both struggles and triumphs)

Lubchenko,Anton (1985 ) - Prayer Song (Chamber Concerto for piano and orchestra in d-moll) 2006 58 
Alexander Titov (conductor)

http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/30500

 
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kyjo
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« Reply #313 on: December 23, 2013, 10:34:43 pm »

On the "unsung" side of the spectrum, I've recently listened to Gaziza Zhubanova's Symphony no. 1 Energy and EH Meyer's Viola Concerto. Neither made a very big impression on me, but the Zhubanova has a striking organ solo about 3/4 of the way through.

Listened earlier today to Brahms' PC 2 with Gilels/Jochum. I'd forgotten how much I loved this work. I actually prefer the second PC by some distance to the first PC, with the exception of the menacing opening of the latter. PC 1 seems to have too much note-spinning.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #314 on: December 23, 2013, 10:45:28 pm »

On the "unsung" side of the spectrum, I've recently listened to Gaziza Zhubanova's Symphony no. 1 Energy and EH Meyer's Viola Concerto. Neither made a very big impression on me, but the Zhubanova has a striking organ solo about 3/4 of the way through.

Listened earlier today to Brahms' PC 2 with Gilels/Jochum. I'd forgotten how much I loved this work. I actually prefer the second PC by some distance to the first PC, with the exception of the menacing opening of the latter. PC 1 seems to have too much note-spinning.

Ha!! Excellent taste Smiley No one does the Brahms better than the Gilels/Jochum combination imo. The opening of the First is indeed absolutely marvellous: savage, biting, snarling, rasping music Grin Grin
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