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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14719 times)
cilgwyn
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« Reply #255 on: December 09, 2013, 05:08:05 pm »

Someone else likes Rubinstein! And there I was thinking I was making a fool of myself sticking up for his music (see earlier post!) Sad Grin (And maybe I am?!! Sad Shocked)
I like his Fifth,too. In fact,I think it's actually more enjoyable and interesting than the rather more well known Ocean Symphony. This one actually sounds a bit Russian! Not that I actually mind when Rubinstein doesn't! (Not terribly often,really!)And unlike Tchaikovsky,he says what he has to say without bombarding my ear'oles with huge noisy climaxes every five minutes. Not that I don't like Tchaikovsky. I love his music.In fact there really is no comparison in terms of inspiration;but then I like Parry,Stanford,Elgar and Vaughan Williams and I'm not worried about Parry and Stanford being under the influence of German composers. I just take them on their own terms.
Having said that;I do miss the emotional content,the feeling,the passion that I get from the best of Parry and Stanford. Rubinstein seems more of a technician. Certainly any passion or feeling that is expressed in his music is far more subdued.
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #256 on: December 09, 2013, 07:04:26 pm »

Thank you, SerAmantiodiNicolao, Albania is still very unknown to most of us. But what I heard sofar they made me want to know more of them.


Albania's a near-total unknown to me, too.  The disc was a bonus, though - it came with a disc of Kosovar (!) orchestral music, which I ordered from the conductor's site which I linked.  Haven't started that one yet, but I'll get to it shortly.
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« Reply #257 on: December 09, 2013, 07:26:05 pm »

Someone else likes Rubinstein! And there I was thinking I was making a fool of myself sticking up for his music (see earlier post!) Sad Grin (And maybe I am?!! Sad Shocked)
I like his Fifth,too. In fact,I think it's actually more enjoyable and interesting than the rather more well known Ocean Symphony. This one actually sounds a bit Russian! Not that I actually mind when Rubinstein doesn't! (Not terribly often,really!)And unlike Tchaikovsky,he says what he has to say without bombarding my ear'oles with huge noisy climaxes every five minutes. Not that I don't like Tchaikovsky. I love his music.In fact there really is no comparison in terms of inspiration;but then I like Parry,Stanford,Elgar and Vaughan Williams and I'm not worried about Parry and Stanford being under the influence of German composers. I just take them on their own terms.
Having said that;I do miss the emotional content,the feeling,the passion that I get from the best of Parry and Stanford. Rubinstein seems more of a technician. Certainly any passion or feeling that is expressed in his music is far more subdued.


Rubinstein's 5th "sounds a bit Russian" because Rubinstein meant it to Grin That is why it is sometimes subtitled "The Russian". The themes and melodies are consciously "Russian".

As I said before, I don't think Rubinstein deserves the contempt shown towards his music by Balakirev and his followers. At the same time however I can recognise that the Russian Nationalist school-Balakirev himself, Mussorgsky, Borodin, Rimsky-Korsakov-possessed far more talent in developing a distinctively Russian-style of composition and that their music has a colour and a passion which is both more progressive than Rubinstein's and, ultimately, much more interesting than the latter's well-schooled, pleasant but backward-looking music.
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« Reply #258 on: December 09, 2013, 07:49:35 pm »

The combination Albania-Kosovo is not so strange. They are in fact the same people. The only thing is that Ksovars were ruled by Serbs, and they did count as second grade people there. Now the difference is so obvious that the Kosovar people didn't, in their struggle for freedom, even think about becoming a part of Albania. They didn't so well under the Serbs, but the situation in Albania for decennia edven worse, suppressed by their own leadership..

But back to Albania: interesting composers there are, I think Cesc Zadeja, Limoz Dizdari, Kozma Lara, ThomaGaqi and Feim Ibrahimi.

But back to thread:
Now listening to Zadeja's 1st symphony. The sound quality is not so marvelous.

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kyjo
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« Reply #259 on: December 09, 2013, 08:08:20 pm »

Raff symphony No 8. Not particularly deep,but one of his best,as opposed to 'best'! Colourful orchestration,tuneful,nice and restful. I think Raff No's 3-5 are actually very good and deserve to be heard more often than they do. The Piano Concerto is absolutely lovely. A pity then that the admittedly entertaining 'Wild Hunt' in the finale of the Third just isn't scary enough! And the Fifth just isn't anywhere near as creepy or spine chilling as it should be! Even in Raff's best scores there's a chunk of the old Victorian drawing room,a salon quality,which prevents me from taking some of the high flown adulation of the pro-Raff camp too seriously. Yes,Raff was a talented composer who didn't quite deserve his postumous neglect. Yes,his best scores,like the Third and Fifth,do deserve an occasional concert hall outing;but let's face it. Maybe,even for the most fervent Raff admirers,it's a good thing they don't. The critics would tear them apart! Best in my opinion,if you do like Raff,to enjoy the recent flood of top notch Raff recordings and appreciate Raff for what he is! Either way,I have always loved woodland,so the Thirds always going to be on my list of cds worth playing;even if the 'Wild Hunt' doesn't scare the pants off me!

I'll leave that to Berlioz!! Shocked Grin

Raff was undoubtedly a fine composer, but I find much of his music rather underwhelming. A Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Berlioz, Liszt, or Wagner he was NOT, as some folks at UC and other places make him out to be. That said, I like his Fifth Symphony a lot, especially the stirring concluding march. But nothing about his music "grabs me by the throat", if you will.
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kyjo
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« Reply #260 on: December 09, 2013, 08:13:18 pm »

Someone else likes Rubinstein! And there I was thinking I was making a fool of myself sticking up for his music (see earlier post!) Sad Grin (And maybe I am?!! Sad Shocked)
I like his Fifth,too. In fact,I think it's actually more enjoyable and interesting than the rather more well known Ocean Symphony. This one actually sounds a bit Russian! Not that I actually mind when Rubinstein doesn't! (Not terribly often,really!)And unlike Tchaikovsky,he says what he has to say without bombarding my ear'oles with huge noisy climaxes every five minutes. Not that I don't like Tchaikovsky. I love his music.In fact there really is no comparison in terms of inspiration;but then I like Parry,Stanford,Elgar and Vaughan Williams and I'm not worried about Parry and Stanford being under the influence of German composers. I just take them on their own terms.
Having said that;I do miss the emotional content,the feeling,the passion that I get from the best of Parry and Stanford. Rubinstein seems more of a technician. Certainly any passion or feeling that is expressed in his music is far more subdued.

I definitely agree with you about Rubinstein's Fifth sounding much more "Russian" than his other symphonies, and that is precisely why it is (by some distance) my favorite symphony of his. His other symphonies might as well have been written by a German composer in the mid-1800s. Now, I must stop degrading unsung mid-romantic composers Grin

Oh, I'm not done.....I'd much rather be bombarded by Tchaikovsky's huge, noisy climaxes than lulled to sleep by Rubinstein's pleasant mediocracy. OK, now I'm done Grin
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #261 on: December 09, 2013, 10:05:29 pm »

I didn't say I actually disliked Tchaikovsky bombarding my ear'oles with huge,noisy climaxes every five minutes,Kyjo! Grin The more the merrier,I say,if they're that good! And some cannons please! Oh  yes,he did those too!! Shocked Grin
I do quite like some of Rubinstein's music though,and after all if we all agreed about every single thing there wouldn't be much of a forum! Although,you'd hear less about Anton Rubinstein! Grin

Funny you mention Rubinstein in relation to sleep! One of the composers I have been loading into my cd changer at the weekend,before getting into bed (cordless headphones!) is Tchaikovsky. He probably does help me sleep;but in a good way! Grin
Schmidt's Second and Berlioz's 'Harold in Italy' were on there,too!

 

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cilgwyn
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« Reply #262 on: December 09, 2013, 10:29:31 pm »

Enough Rubinstein for now! I'm listening to Weber's 'Der Freischutz',which has to be one of my all time favourite operas. Those idiots who keep trying to update the libretto and add psychological overtones and things like that do annoy me (a bit! Grin). The supernatural elements and the spooky glen are great fun! I think I'll pop out and cast a magic bullet later! Shocked Grin

That's better (sticky keyboard!)
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #263 on: December 09, 2013, 10:40:06 pm »

The combination Albania-Kosovo is not so strange. They are in fact the same people. The only thing is that Ksovars were ruled by Serbs, and they did count as second grade people there. Now the difference is so obvious that the Kosovar people didn't, in their struggle for freedom, even think about becoming a part of Albania. They didn't so well under the Serbs, but the situation in Albania for decennia edven worse, suppressed by their own leadership..



Well, yes.  The "(!)" was more to do with the fact that I had managed to find some for purchase online.  Grin
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #264 on: December 10, 2013, 12:09:55 pm »

After listening to Weber's Der Freischutz last night,I thought I might follow it up with something in a similar vein. Out came Marschner's 'Der Vampyr'! It was just after midnight and I'm sitting there listening to the overture (and half asleep) suddenly this creepy sounding church bell really spooked me out. An impressive aria,or monologue,by the Vampire (a few scant notes with the cd set,no libretto!) and an eerie atmosphere throughout. The musical invention very consistent. You think,this is fairly obscure (it did get on bbc2 once,of course!) it's got to look a bit shaky after a masterpiece like 'Der Freischutz';but no,indeed. Very impressive! Maybe,the Vampire story line keeps it from being taken as seriously as it should? But in this day and age of tv series like 'True blood' and 'The Walking dead' I would have though interest would have grown in this creepy rarity?!! Huh Roll Eyes

Not sure if it was a good idea to listen to this one before bed,though?!! Shocked Shocked
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shamus
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« Reply #265 on: December 10, 2013, 03:29:42 pm »

There are many pieces by Richard Rudolf Klein (1921-2011) from Germany on SoundCloud and I have been listening to them, some really nice oratorios, and the most interesting to me is his Capriccio Concertante for piano and chamber orch. Unfortunately there are no notes on performers, a couple have spoken introductions. Quite a lot of music from someone I hadn't heard of before.

https://soundcloud.com/richardrklein21-1
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« Reply #266 on: December 10, 2013, 04:54:11 pm »

Oh the penalties of being a symphonic completist Roll Eyes

The recent Naxos release of Leonardo Balada's Symphony No.1 "Sinfonia en Negro: Homage to Martin Luther King"/Double Concerto for Oboe and Clarinet/"Columbus: Images for Orchestra"

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Naxos/8573047

Purgatory for me Roll Eyes I know perfectly well that this is another cd I shall never listen to again and which will gather dust on my shelves.
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kyjo
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« Reply #267 on: December 10, 2013, 08:03:08 pm »

Oh the penalties of being a symphonic completist Roll Eyes

The recent Naxos release of Leonardo Balada's Symphony No.1 "Sinfonia en Negro: Homage to Martin Luther King"/Double Concerto for Oboe and Clarinet/"Columbus: Images for Orchestra"

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Naxos/8573047

Purgatory for me Roll Eyes I know perfectly well that this is another cd I shall never listen to again and which will gather dust on my shelves.

I'm not a great fan of Balada's music either, but I heard his Symphony of Sorrows (no. 6, I believe) played (and commissioned) by the Pittsburgh Symphony recently and was rather impressed by it!
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #268 on: December 10, 2013, 10:05:03 pm »

After listening to Weber's Der Freischutz last night,I thought I might follow it up with something in a similar vein. Out came Marschner's 'Der Vampyr'! It was just after midnight and I'm sitting there listening to the overture (and half asleep) suddenly this creepy sounding church bell really spooked me out. An impressive aria,or monologue,by the Vampire (a few scant notes with the cd set,no libretto!) and an eerie atmosphere throughout. The musical invention very consistent. You think,this is fairly obscure (it did get on bbc2 once,of course!) it's got to look a bit shaky after a masterpiece like 'Der Freischutz';but no,indeed. Very impressive! Maybe,the Vampire story line keeps it from being taken as seriously as it should? But in this day and age of tv series like 'True blood' and 'The Walking dead' I would have though interest would have grown in this creepy rarity?!! Huh Roll Eyes

Not sure if it was a good idea to listen to this one before bed,though?!! Shocked Shocked

Marschner is a fascinating composer.  I have on DVD a performance of his Hans Heiling from Sardinia, of all places, that was done a few years ago.  It's a stunning piece - the missing link between Weber and Wagner if ever there was one.  It mixes speech and song freely, and breaks the barriers between ensemble movements in a way that nothing earlier does, that I'm aware.  I highly recommend checking it out if you ever come across it.

I put the Albanians to bed last night - a net positive, though my mind was elsewhere due to some evils affecting my computer.  Nevertheless, I found much of the music to be quite attractive, if unmemorable.  I next listened to some Bernhard Sekles - eh.  Not terribly memorable, I'm afraid.  But it's a nice disc from Toccata Classics.  Right now I'm listening to some four-handed piano music by the Bulgarian Alexander Yossifov.  Quite pleasant.  Again, rather unmemorable, but I'm not complaining.  Cheesy
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #269 on: December 10, 2013, 10:34:58 pm »

Thank you for your reply! I have 'Hans Heiling' on cd. I find it remarkable that Marschner's operas were overlooked by record labels,throughout the 60s and 70s,when lesser known operas of this quality were still being recorded in studios and would have garnered a suitably 'starry cast'.
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