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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14627 times)
dhibbard
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« Reply #210 on: December 02, 2013, 05:36:07 am »

http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue/product.aspx?pid=1978823

hey what's with Naxos new series called "CLassical Archives:Huh  apparently not available in the US?



GRINBLATS, R.: Rigonda Suite (Latvian State Opera and Ballet Theatre Orchestra, Tons) (1961)

Composer(s)   Grinblats, Romaulds
Artist(s)    Tons, Edgars, Conductor • Latvian State Opera and Ballet Theatre Orchestra
   
Genre    Classical Music
Category    Unknown
Catalogue    9.81209
Label    Naxos Classical Archives
   
    This album is not available in your country due to licensing restrictions or copyright laws that provide or may provide for terms of protection for sound recordings that differ from the rest of the world.
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #211 on: December 03, 2013, 06:11:55 pm »

Spohr symphony No 5 today! I was very pleased to see the 'rave' review of the cpo cd of his fourth and fifth symphonies and the enthusiasm expressed for this composer in the December issue of IRR Magazine. After reading the review I just had to listen to the fifth again,as I wasn't as convinced as I was by the fourth,which is already one of my favourite Spohr symphonies. Anyway,thanks to the review,the fifth is now on my 'best of Spohr list!' I am now very happy that I DID buy the December issue of IRR. I usually buy it,but I must admit to almost skipping this months because of my increasing disappointment with recent releases. My mistake! This is what a good enthusiasts magazine is all about! In short,thank you IRR Magazine! Let the Spohr be with you! Grin

Spohr's fifth was followed by Raff's Piano Concerto (and it's still on!) Not a composer I am prone to rave about. I enjoy Raff at his best,and I do think his best music deserves to be heard;but his romantic scores just don't have the depth of expression of,say Weber,Mendelssohn or Schumann.
Having said that,his Piano Concerto is a lovely creation. Beautifully orchestrated,brim full of lovely tunes;and the slow movement is an absolute cracker with all the makings of a Classic FM (YUK!) 'pop' hit! And I hope that's not too disparaging! (Raff may be a little overrated in certain quarters,but he's not that bad that he deserves to be on Classic FM!) Grin Absolutely delightful;and I like the 'Ode to Spring' coupled with it,too (although the Piano Concerto is better).
As to why the Piano Concerto makes such an impression on me? I think it's partly because Raff just wrote this as a beautiful,tuneful piece of music. Unlike the symphonies and some other concert works I've heard there are no high flown pretensions. And that's why this one 'works' for me!! Lovely!
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« Reply #212 on: December 03, 2013, 07:29:59 pm »

Played, urged by some of you here, the Erkki Melartin symphonic cycle, during the last weeks. Though the idiom is a little bit too romantic to my taste - for similar reasons I didn't surrender completely to the even more 'brazen romantic' Atterberg, a few years ago when the Swede was the talk of the day in fora like these  Grin - I love the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth especially. Almost like a 'better', saner and wiser and more humane, Mahler.  Cool
Hope to follow the lead by some of the more adventurous here in discovering other new composers. Many thanks to all who helped me discover Melartin!
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #213 on: December 03, 2013, 08:09:25 pm »

Played, urged by some of you here, the Erkki Melartin symphonic cycle, during the last weeks. Though the idiom is a little bit too romantic to my taste - for similar reasons I didn't surrender completely to the even more 'brazen romantic' Atterberg, a few years ago when the Swede was the talk of the day in fora like these  Grin - I love the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth especially. Almost like a 'better', saner and wiser and more humane, Mahler.  Cool
Hope to follow the lead by some of the more adventurous here in discovering other new composers. Many thanks to all who helped my to discover Melartin!

Oooh - I quite like the Melartin symphonies that I've heard.  I don't know the complete cycle - I only have two (I think?  Maybe one.) on CD.  But he's squarely within my crosshairs as the sort of thing that I enjoy.
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kyjo
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« Reply #214 on: December 03, 2013, 08:44:56 pm »

Played, urged by some of you here, the Erkki Melartin symphonic cycle, during the last weeks. Though the idiom is a little bit too romantic to my taste - for similar reasons I didn't surrender completely to the even more 'brazen romantic' Atterberg, a few years ago when the Swede was the talk of the day in fora like these  Grin - I love the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth especially. Almost like a 'better', saner and wiser and more humane, Mahler.  Cool
Hope to follow the lead by some of the more adventurous here in discovering other new composers. Many thanks to all who helped my to discover Melartin!

I suppose I am mostly to "blame" for you discovering the Melartin symphonies, Johan Grin Excellent works, all of them, and, as you point out, nos. 4-6 are especially magnificent. At the moment, who do you prefer, Melartin or Atterberg?
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kyjo
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« Reply #215 on: December 03, 2013, 08:46:34 pm »

Oooh - I quite like the Melartin symphonies that I've heard.  I don't know the complete cycle - I only have two (I think?  Maybe one.) on CD.  But he's squarely within my crosshairs as the sort of thing that I enjoy.

Yes, definitely check out the other symphonies, especially if you haven't yet heard nos. 4-6! Oh dear, I am sounding like a broken record Embarrassed......
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #216 on: December 03, 2013, 09:44:18 pm »



Milos Bok - Oratorio 'Gnomes of the Valley of Krinice'.

Yes, the strangest oratorio name I've met, yet a serious piece by a very driven composer (also enjoyed on YT a documentary about the recording of his 'Credo'.)
Is he familiar to anyone - considering buying a/some CD(s), so informed opinion appreciated ? To me, some of his music's majestic...Czech authorities seem to disagree.
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Clive
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« Reply #217 on: December 03, 2013, 10:04:54 pm »

I suppose I am mostly to "blame" for you discovering the Melartin symphonies, Johan Grin Excellent works, all of them, and, as you point out, nos. 4-6 are especially magnificent. At the moment, who do you prefer, Melartin or Atterberg?

Yes, you are. :-) and I now prefer Melartin over Atterberg, find him more 'personal' and less 'artificial' (for lack of more precise qualifications).
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
kyjo
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« Reply #218 on: December 03, 2013, 10:43:02 pm »

Yes, you are. :-) and I now prefer Melartin over Atterberg, find him more 'personal' and less 'artificial' (for lack of more precise qualifications).

Yes, Melartin does have an individual voice, despite being influenced by Tchaikovsky, Bruckner, Sibelius, Nielsen etc. I can see why you might find Atterberg's music rather "artificial", but I urge to re-listen to his Fifth Symphony, which is his darkest and most "personal" work, and not as decadently romantic as the other symphonies.
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #219 on: December 04, 2013, 04:35:12 pm »

Aram Khachaturian - Symphony no. 3, & ,later, Richard Einhorn - Voices of Light Oratorio......a couple of days of inspiring music !
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Clive
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« Reply #220 on: December 05, 2013, 09:04:50 am »

Please don't be put off by the title, and don't miss this..it is compelling piece music by a composer who should be much better known. This piece is chock-full of magical orchestral effects. Atonal?? I think not..but there is some doubt..

Anhalt, Istvan (1919 –2012) - Sparkskraps (1987)   
Alex Pauk (conductor),ESPRIT ORCHESTRA.
Recorded at Oasis Studios, Toronto (Canada), March 1992.
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/54208

I will certainly listen to the balance of his music here:

http://classical-music-online.net/en/composer/Anhalt/2241

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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #221 on: December 05, 2013, 10:59:38 am »

Please don't be put off by the title, and don't miss this..it is compelling piece music by a composer who should be much better known. This piece is chock-full of magical orchestral effects. Atonal?? I think not..but there is some doubt..

Anhalt, Istvan (1919 –2012) - Sparkskraps (1987)   
Alex Pauk (conductor),ESPRIT ORCHESTRA.
Recorded at Oasis Studios, Toronto (Canada), March 1992.
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/54208

I will certainly listen to the balance of his music here:

http://classical-music-online.net/en/composer/Anhalt/2241



Well done, Mr. JR - definitely a 'find' !
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Clive
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« Reply #222 on: December 05, 2013, 12:43:50 pm »

Richard Einhorn - Voices of Light Oratorio......a couple of days of inspiring music !

You're the first I ever hear - read - about the piece. I 'discovered' it by chance ten years ago and love it dearly. Gave it away about five times to friends - and again, heard nothing ever after. Wink What's your impression of it?

Yes, Melartin does have an individual voice, despite being influenced by Tchaikovsky, Bruckner, Sibelius, Nielsen etc. I can see why you might find Atterberg's music rather "artificial", but I urge to re-listen to his Fifth Symphony, which is his darkest and most "personal" work, and not as decadently romantic as the other symphonies.

Thanks for the tip! Am playing the Fifth at this moment, and begin to see what you mean. I think I only played the later symphonies, as I generally prefer later work with all romantic composers, so I played Atterberg 7 and 8 a lot (and my 'articiallity' refers to No. 7 especially) and also the Ninth and Sixth. Up for No. 5 now.

I remember I had a similar experience with Rangström, playing his Third and Fourth Symphonies and not liking them at all (again, found them mannerist, not very 'sincere') and it took years before I played his First and found it far more convincing.  Roll Eyes

BTW, though the booklet coming with the Ondine set of the six symphonies gives no hint of their existence, Melartin actually composed two more symphonies. Wikipedia describes them as Symphony No. 7 "Sinfonia gaia", Op. 149 (1935–1936, unfinished) and Symphony No. 8, Op. 186 (1936–1937, incomplete). Given the development shown in the previous six, I'm sure I would be most interested in these two later symphonies. Does anyone have any information about them? Can they be performed in some form - and have they been?  Roll Eyes
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kyjo
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« Reply #223 on: December 05, 2013, 07:58:35 pm »

Thanks for the tip! Am playing the Fifth at this moment, and begin to see what you mean. I think I only played the later symphonies, as I generally prefer later work with all romantic composers, so I played Atterberg 7 and 8 a lot (and my 'articiallity' refers to No. 7 especially) and also the Ninth and Sixth. Up for No. 5 now.

I remember I had a similar experience with Rangström, playing his Third and Fourth Symphonies and not liking them at all (again, found them mannerist, not very 'sincere') and it took years before I played his First and found it far more convincing.  Roll Eyes

BTW, though the booklet coming with the Ondine set of the six symphonies gives no hint of their existence, Melartin actually composed two more symphonies. Wikipedia describes them as Symphony No. 7 "Sinfonia gaia", Op. 149 (1935–1936, unfinished) and Symphony No. 8, Op. 186 (1936–1937, incomplete). Given the development shown in the previous six, I'm sure I would be most interested in these two later symphonies. Does anyone have any information about them? Can they be performed in some form - and have they been?  Roll Eyes

Re Atterberg: Don't skip over the earlier symphonies, especially no. 3, which is my personal favorite of the cycle. You may find it too lushly romantic for your tastes, but do give it a listen!

Re Rangstrom: Oddly enough, I rather prefer his Third and Fourth symphonies to the first two! Rangstrom is not a very "sincere" composer by nature: he's very unbuttoned and not afraid to go over-the-top!

Re Melartin: Unfortunately, his Symphonies 7-9 are largely unfinished Sad Tapiola wrote this in another thread:

A few more details....The manuscript for the 7th contains only the first movement (allegro) plus the first page of the second (without a tempo marking). The manuscript information says "keskeneräinen orkestrointi Artturi Rope", meaning "unfinished orchestration by AR"; I don't know whether this means that the orchestration is unfinished, because the symphony is unfinished, or whether the orchestration for the existing first movement is unfinished. There are some sketches for the 8th, but they "are so difficult to decipher and fragmentary that there can be no talk of a composition in the proper sense". No manuscript-material has been found for "Symphony no 9", although in a letter to a friend, dated January 6, 1936, Melartin writes that it is "now finished". So what we do have are the first six symphonies plus the first movement for the 7th, to which the composer gave the name "Sinfonia gaia". This information was derived from the excellent home pages of Erkki Melartin Seura.

But who knows, perhaps someone could patch up the Seventh, at least? Huh
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« Reply #224 on: December 05, 2013, 08:10:36 pm »

Many thanks, very helpful again!

RE Rangström: I realized that my memory had fooled me soon after posting this.  Lips sealed It was his Second Symphony that I first heard and that's the one that kept me away from all others for long. I played the Third and Fourth later today, and they are indeed the ones I will return to.  Smiley
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948

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