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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14633 times)
Dundonnell
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« Reply #195 on: November 27, 2013, 04:47:38 pm »

Listening to The Symphonic Fantasy on BACH by Eugen Suchon.
This is one of the most horrific, turbulent and eerie works I have ever heard.
Put away all sharp objects before listening..this is very rough sledding, Kabelec's angriest moments come to mind. Be advised that the clip is over attenuated and should be played at the lowest 2 notches of the volume control at this site:

Eugen Suchon (1908 1993 ) - Symphonic Fantasy on BACH for Organ and Orchestra (1971)   
Czech Radio Symphony Orchestra, Ferdinand Klinda (organ),Jaroslaw Krombholc (conductor)

http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/41378

This performance of the Suchon is also on YT.  I had an older recording with the same soloist but with the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra under Ludovit Rajter. The Krombhloc is a much better recording.
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britishcomposer
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« Reply #196 on: November 27, 2013, 06:44:01 pm »

The Balfour Gardiner Overture is not a first recording either but a very engaging piece.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=166967

Wrong thread, Mathias Smiley

Sorry, all!
I use the "Recent Posts" function when reading new entries and hit the neighbouring thread...  Embarrassed
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #197 on: November 27, 2013, 08:20:20 pm »

Listening to The Symphonic Fantasy on BACH by Eugen Suchon.
This is one of the most horrific, turbulent and eerie works I have ever heard.
Put away all sharp objects before listening..this is very rough sledding, Kabelec's angriest moments come to mind. Be advised that the clip is over attenuated and should be played at the lowest 2 notches of the volume control at this site:

Eugen Suchon (1908 1993 ) - Symphonic Fantasy on BACH for Organ and Orchestra (1971)   
Czech Radio Symphony Orchestra, Ferdinand Klinda (organ),Jaroslaw Krombholc (conductor)

http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/41378

I hope I have not exaggerated on this piece, but I found it to be disturbing..
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #198 on: November 27, 2013, 08:24:01 pm »

Listening to?!! Franz Lachner's Fifth symphony, but I'll be taking it off shortly as it's been left on repeat for hours.Not that I've been listening to it all the time. It's not that good!! I was replacing a dodgy video recorder with an even older one that,hopefully works. (And yes,I do have a dvd player! Grin) A post at the 'other' forum prompted me to have another listen to Lachner 5! An intriguing and rather obscure 19th c symphony. The theme in the first movement is great,but I can't help think what a composer like Schumann might have made of it. The finale is lively and makes up for a lack of rhythmic variety and memorable themes in between movements 1 & 2. In short,I find it intriguing and I quite like it;but I won't be playing it that much!! Grin Maybe,a little more Lachner (his eighth) then? Lachner is sometimes referred to as a sort of 'missing link' (No,not that kind!! Grin) . I'm not really that convinced by what I've heard so far,but it would be nice to get a chance to hear his other,unrecorded,symphonies.(Edit:shortened a bit! Smiley)
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #199 on: November 27, 2013, 10:26:58 pm »

Just begun Lachner's eighth symphony. This is rather nice;and so far,I prefer it to allot of Raff. I just hope the remaining movements live up to this one. Of course,I have heard it before,but this time I'm going to give it a bit more of a go. Incidentally,this has better sound quality than allot of those Marco Polo recordings. I wish they'd all been this good!
Sorry,I'm not listening to anything more recent!

 Shocked Yikes! I'm enjoying this Lachner symphony so much I'm starting to wonder whether I've playing the wrong cdr! (It's a download). No5 was intriguing but a little plodding in places. This one has a lovely light touch,and a particularly lovely,serene slow movement. I'm very surprised! Shocked Smiley So why two Raff cycles (and a bit!) and only three Lachner symphonies on cd?! Sad

Not so convinced by the final movements. Not that I don't like them,but they're a bit more like predictable lesser 19thc composer fare. But it's still an interesting alternative to the usual suspects.

I wonder what I'll be listening to today (after it get's light!)?
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #200 on: November 28, 2013, 12:32:30 pm »

Spohr today instead of Beethoven! Huh Grin
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #201 on: November 28, 2013, 04:56:43 pm »

I was tempted to post,"Spohr today,Spohr tomorrow",but for some reason I resisted!
I might even listen to some Beethoven later on! Grin
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #202 on: November 29, 2013, 02:04:27 am »

Right now: Alexander Kopylov's symphony, and some orchestral incidentals.  Quite nice - I just picked it up secondhand.

I haven't decided what's on deck; most likely the Frederick Jacobi cello concerto, a piece for which I have a deep love.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #203 on: December 01, 2013, 01:48:22 am »

While the music is not at all similar, the last time I was this impressed was with Joly Braga Santos Symphony 4.
Maybe it was just my mood, but I think this music is absolutely marvelous and should not be missed..I have relistened to it at least 3 times..
crank it up!!

Du Mingxin(1928) - Great Wall of China, symphony
Jean Kenneth (conductor),Hong Kong Philharmonic Orch
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/33329
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #204 on: December 01, 2013, 01:50:26 am »

At the moment, I'm listening to the Busoni Piano Concerto.  Perhaps it's not the most unsung piece in human history, but it's new to me, and thus far I really quite like it.
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kyjo
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« Reply #205 on: December 01, 2013, 02:43:28 am »

While the music is not at all similar, the last time I was this impressed was with Joly Braga Santos Symphony 4.
Maybe it was just my mood, but I think this music is absolutely marvelous and should not be missed..I have relistened to it at least 3 times..
crank it up!!

Du Mingxin(1928) - Great Wall of China, symphony
Jean Kenneth (conductor),Hong Kong Philharmonic Orch
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/33329

Now, I sincerely doubt that any piece new to me will impress me as JBS 4 (one of my all-time favorite pieces of music, as I have stated innumerable times), but I'll give that Mingxin work a try thanks to your enthusiasm, Roger! BTW I greatly appreciating you posting about your "finds" on classical-music-online.net. It helps a lot, considering how much rare music has been posted there!
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kyjo
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« Reply #206 on: December 01, 2013, 02:44:51 am »

At the moment, I'm listening to the Busoni Piano Concerto.  Perhaps it's not the most unsung piece in human history, but it's new to me, and thus far I really quite like it.

Yep, it's a great work-a stroke of genius to be sure. The finale is something else!
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SerAmantiodiNicolao
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« Reply #207 on: December 01, 2013, 02:49:41 am »

At the moment, I'm listening to the Busoni Piano Concerto.  Perhaps it's not the most unsung piece in human history, but it's new to me, and thus far I really quite like it.

Yep, it's a great work-a stroke of genius to be sure. The finale is something else!

To say the least.  But there's a great deal besides that I find I like in it.

A shade long, perhaps, but no matter.  I'm glad I've finally introduced myself to it.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #208 on: December 01, 2013, 09:49:27 pm »


[/quote]

Yep, it's a great work-a stroke of genius to be sure. The finale is something else!
[/quote]

Kyle, I totally agree with your sentiments re The Braga Santos 4 and feel the same way. My intent was to draw attention to this music. There is also this fine companion piece which also gets very very high marks!!

Du Mingxin (1928 )  - Festival Overture
Jean Kenneth (conductor)
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/33330

Thanks for the great feedback..
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kyjo
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« Reply #209 on: December 02, 2013, 05:32:15 am »

As recommended by Jolly Roger, I listened to Weinberg's Symphony no. 18 for chorus and orchestra (1986), subtitled War-there is no word more cruel. I must say that this is one of my best discoveries as of late! This deeply moving work is far from being all doom-and-gloom-it is wonderfully humane and inspiriting. The first movement opens with a beautiful passage for four cellos (?), but the mood becomes increasingly darker. The chorus is introduced in the elegiac second movement, which is a lament for the fallen. The mood brightens temporarily in the third movement with the entry of the womens' chorus, singing a simple, folk-like tune. The tone becomes inevitably more agitated as the movement progresses, leading to an orchestral tutti section complete with wailing trombones. The music dies down when the chorus re-enters and paves the way for a haunting section with a prominent part for the balalaika. The short final movement is a meditation (for chorus alone) on the words in the subtitle of the work. The symphony closes on a deeply valedictory note. Let's hope this one is next on Naxos' or Chandos' agenda!
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