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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14720 times)
Jolly Roger
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« Reply #180 on: November 20, 2013, 12:27:17 am »

Listening to Eino Tamberg's Joanna Tenata Ballet..WOW!!
I was held spellbound by this music...it is music NOT TO BE MISSED..
If you are not familiar with Tamberg's music, this is an excellent place to start.

http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/34965
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Elroel
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« Reply #181 on: November 20, 2013, 01:51:25 am »

Well, Jolly Roger you are absolutely right!! This is fascinating music.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #182 on: November 20, 2013, 05:50:33 am »

Well, Jolly Roger you are absolutely right!! This is fascinating music.
The dramatic music is very turbulent at times, and quite lyrical at others.
This puts the high drama of the music in some context:
From http://contemporaryperformance.org/events/joanna-tentata
"Inspired by the supposed possession, Joanna Tenata tells the tale of a Mother Superior possessed by demons and the man who tries to save her.
It is a story about dogmas, exorcism and love, what is based on real event occurred in 17th century, with Ursuline nuns of the town of Loudun in France.
It is a love story about a man and a woman who wear church clothes, and whose religion does not allow them to love each other. The devils that possess these characters are the external manifestations of their repressed love."
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guest54
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« Reply #183 on: November 20, 2013, 07:23:19 am »

I have been listening to Delius's sublime 'Cello Concerto (1921), than which no other piece of music can give more pleasure. "This concerto gives us fullest measure of Delius's richest orchestration and most lavish harmony," wrote Arthur Hutchings. "The music, with its beguiling beauty and riotous colour, is of the composer's best."

Well performed by Raphael Wallfisch with Mackerras and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic.
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ahinton
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« Reply #184 on: November 20, 2013, 10:07:15 am »

I have been listening to Delius's sublime 'Cello Concerto (1921), than which no other piece of music can give more pleasure. "This concerto gives us fullest measure of Delius's richest orchestration and most lavish harmony," wrote Arthur Hutchings. "The music, with its beguiling beauty and riotous colour, is of the composer's best."

Well performed by Raphael Wallfisch with Mackerras and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic.
That's surely an impossibly large claim for this Delius work, attractive though it undoubtedly is (and actually, for what it may be worth, I much prefer the same composer's Double Concerto...)
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #185 on: November 20, 2013, 10:55:25 am »

Well, Jolly Roger you are absolutely right!! This is fascinating music.
The dramatic music is very turbulent at times, and quite lyrical at others.
This puts the high drama of the music in some context:
From http://contemporaryperformance.org/events/joanna-tentata
"Inspired by the supposed possession, Joanna Tenata tells the tale of a Mother Superior possessed by demons and the man who tries to save her.
It is a story about dogmas, exorcism and love, what is based on real event occurred in 17th century, with Ursuline nuns of the town of Loudun in France.
It is a love story about a man and a woman who wear church clothes, and whose religion does not allow them to love each other. The devils that possess these characters are the external manifestations of their repressed love."

The same story has been set as an opera by Penderecki - "The Devils Of Loudon", as well as being the story behind Ken Russell's notorious film "The Devils" - which starred Vanessa Redgrave as Mother Jeanne, and Oliver Reed as Pere Grandier.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #186 on: November 20, 2013, 09:43:49 pm »

Well, Jolly Roger you are absolutely right!! This is fascinating music.
The dramatic music is very turbulent at times, and quite lyrical at others.
This puts the high drama of the music in some context:
From http://contemporaryperformance.org/events/joanna-tentata
"Inspired by the supposed possession, Joanna Tenata tells the tale of a Mother Superior possessed by demons and the man who tries to save her.
It is a story about dogmas, exorcism and love, what is based on real event occurred in 17th century, with Ursuline nuns of the town of Loudun in France.
It is a love story about a man and a woman who wear church clothes, and whose religion does not allow them to love each other. The devils that possess these characters are the external manifestations of their repressed love."

The same story has been set as an opera by Penderecki - "The Devils Of Loudon", as well as being the story behind Ken Russell's notorious film "The Devils" - which starred Vanessa Redgrave as Mother Jeanne, and Oliver Reed as Pere Grandier.
Thats very Interesting info, I wonder who did the movie music..I don't think Penderecki did, did he?
The Devils of Loudun was written by Aldous Huxley in 1952, but his Brave New World had a major impact on my thinking.
I'm also thinking this strain of music parallels Prokofiev's powerful Fiery Angel, based another sordid tale.
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kyjo
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« Reply #187 on: November 24, 2013, 04:32:21 am »

Willem Kersters (1929-1998): Symphony no. 3 (1967). A menacing, grim work with restless, propulsive outer movements. The motto theme, grippingly presented at the beginning of the piece, reappears throughout the work. The ending fades away with an oboe (English horn?) solo over pizzicato low strings.
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autoharp
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« Reply #188 on: November 24, 2013, 07:08:56 am »

Thats very Interesting info, I wonder who did the movie music..I don't think Penderecki did, did he?

Peter Maxwell Davies, wasn't it?
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #189 on: November 24, 2013, 08:38:42 am »

Peter Maxwell Davies, wasn't it?

Max does indeed get the composer credit in the film titles.

However, AFAIK much of the music was concocted in collaboration with David Munrow, whose ensemble (the Early Music Consort of London) play on much of the soundtrack. Munrow in turn looked to various Renaissance, early Baroque and medieval composers (including a lot of Praetorius, with which the film opens) for his dots.  And of course Praetorius was a publisher as well as a composer - the dance suites in his Terpsichore are clearly French imports (the different ballets have French titles), although the actual authorship of these pieces is probably now untraceable for the most part. Praetorius certainly deserves an arranger credit, at least Smiley  [Praetorius never bothered much with crediting the composers he included in his dance collections - even though several of the pieces - such as Schein's LA BATTALIA - are clearly not Praetorius's work, and many of them date from up to a century beforehand).  There's also quite a bit of Munrow's own composition and improvisation on the soundtrack - there's a longish bit of improvisation on a Chinese sheng, for example. There are also a few medieval 'hits' on the soundtrack, which are known from different sources - such as "Schiazula Marazula", a pseudo-African (?) piece which was published in all kinds of dance albums from the 1550s onwards - Praetorius also includes it, but in a very watered-down contrapuntal arrangement of his own. It's not impossible that the tune (and it's only a melody-line - presumably played over a drone accompaniment?) had actually come from the Maghreb - shawm bands (shawms on the top lines, drone trumpets below, and a load of drums) used to busk their way round Europe at the time, bringing their own repertoire with them...  they have survived to this day in parts of Catalunya.

[Way back when, I used to have lessons with Alan Lumsden, one of the core Munrow players - who told me who had played and composed what on The Devils. PMD was a friend of Munrow's, and it was all done in friendly collaboration, I believe?]
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #190 on: November 27, 2013, 09:33:14 am »

Listening to The Symphonic Fantasy on BACH by Eugen Suchon.
This is one of the most horrific, turbulent and eerie works I have ever heard.
Put away all sharp objects before listening..this is very rough sledding, Kabelec's angriest moments come to mind. Be advised that the clip is over attenuated and should be played at the lowest 2 notches of the volume control at this site:

Eugen Suchon (1908 1993 ) - Symphonic Fantasy on BACH for Organ and Orchestra (1971)   
Czech Radio Symphony Orchestra, Ferdinand Klinda (organ),Jaroslaw Krombholc (conductor)

http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/41378
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kyjo
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« Reply #191 on: November 27, 2013, 03:54:16 pm »

Wow, I must hear that! I didn't know Suchon composed music like that!
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britishcomposer
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« Reply #192 on: November 27, 2013, 04:15:10 pm »

The Balfour Gardiner Overture is not a first recording either but a very engaging piece.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=166967
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #193 on: November 27, 2013, 04:36:54 pm »

The Balfour Gardiner Overture is not a first recording either but a very engaging piece.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=166967

Wrong thread, Mathias Smiley
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #194 on: November 27, 2013, 04:44:23 pm »

Back from the high seas (C's ?) - yes,quite lovely, thank you; Genova to Santos(Brazil) - on brief call in Barcelona, picked up in the Liceu shop a v. cheap & elderly recording of Rodion Shchedrin's 'Dead Souls' (operatic scenes after the Epic Poem by Nikolai Gogol), that I've just put on as background to this.
 Anyone familiar ?
Don't think it's going to become a 'go to' disc thus far, but very listenable as ever from RS.
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Clive

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