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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14627 times)
Jolly Roger
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« Reply #75 on: September 26, 2013, 06:13:56 pm »

Listening to the gorgeous horn concerto of Erkii Salmenhara. While I can only think of a few horn concertos that are memorable, this one
is heads and shoulders above any others...a wonderful work IMHO and posted here in Finnish music.
While the R Strauss seems to take top billing, Othmar Schoeck and Levko Kolodub have also produced some fine horn concertos.
Hmm..someone want to start a thread on horn concertos, there are many I have not heard and many that were not memorable..
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Christo
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« Reply #76 on: September 27, 2013, 06:49:52 pm »

The Hanus Symphonie Concertante is a marvelous work. The lush textures Hanus is able to create in this work are spellbinding!

Arrived today in the mail - it is all the fault of you all, here, I dare say  Angry - and will play it in a minute.

At this moment I'm still listening to a composer I had never, until yesterday, heard of. And whose very name is not even mentioned in Tomás Marco's Historia de las música española, siglo XX (Tome 6) - that I bought during a conference in Málaga in the Summer of 2000 and that I use as my main reference book regarding modern composers from Spain - let alone his music.

Yesterday in The Hague, I found a cd with four of orchestral works by composer Emilio Lehmberg or Emilio Lehmberg Ruíz (1905-1959), the son of a survivor of the shipwreck of the German frigate 'Gneisenau', that sunk in front of the port of Málaga on 16 December 1900. This marine, Lehmberg senior, married a daughter of the Ruiz-Rodríguez family that welcomed him, and their son is apparently a local name in Málaga, where a street is named after him. The most substantial piece on the cd is his only Symphony, the four-movement Sinfonía, finished a short time before his death in 1959. Of course, they are performed by the Orquesta Filarmónica de Málaga, under director José Luis Temes (Verso 2067).

One of the three other pieces on the cd is a Suite Andaluza from 1942 in five parts, number four a 'Bolero' that sounds uncanningly familiar. Let's say that he found his inspiration in a piece that also heavily inspired Uno Klami's '3 Beaufort' or 'Force 3', part six of the Sea PicturesWink
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
kyjo
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« Reply #77 on: September 27, 2013, 11:30:51 pm »

Listening to the gorgeous horn concerto of Erkii Salmenhara. While I can only think of a few horn concertos that are memorable, this one
is heads and shoulders above any others...a wonderful work IMHO and posted here in Finnish music.
While the R Strauss seems to take top billing, Othmar Schoeck and Levko Kolodub have also produced some fine horn concertos.
Hmm..someone want to start a thread on horn concertos, there are many I have not heard and many that were not memorable..

Here's some excellent horn concerto recordings I've acquired over the years:

      

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cilgwyn
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« Reply #78 on: September 28, 2013, 12:29:48 am »

A very interesting post,kyjo. I hadn't even heard of the Lyrita cd and I thought I was familiar with most of their releases. This received some very interesting,enthusiastic and informative reviews on Musicweb (just had a look). Gramophone take note...these are what you call reviews!! Look at all the stuff about Gilbert Vintner in Rob Barnett's review (for example). His cantata 'The Trumpets' was recorded twice,in the sixties;the first a 1966 HMV release with the great Owen Brannigan?!! Well,I never!! And for once,even the York Bowen sounds tempting!! A post from the Musicweb message Board by 'Jeffrey Davis' (is this our own Vandermolen?!) rounds off his review with a complaint about the neglect of Ruth Gipps by cd labels. The Fourth symphony "a wonderfully life-affirming and inspiriting score". "All the works by this composer that I have heard have been great". And quite frankly I have,personally, lost count of all the enthusiastic posts and reviews I have read,in various places,over the years,about this composer;so why no isn't her music being recorded? It certainly doesn't fit into the Cooke,Fricker,Jones bracket. It all seems pretty approachable stuff and allot less controversial than York Bowen,who,quite frankly,seems to gather a lot of negative posts,despite the flood of recordings!
All in all a very tempting sounding cd,indeed! How long can I resist?!!!

One Amazon review describes the playing on this cd as in the "sensational class"! One very silly review there,too! The comment left is spot on! Dear oh dear!! Roll Eyes Grin
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kyjo
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« Reply #79 on: September 28, 2013, 12:52:56 am »

You'd really enjoy that disc, cilgwyn. Yes, even the Bowen work Grin
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Christo
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« Reply #80 on: September 28, 2013, 10:52:19 am »

A post from the Musicweb message Board by 'Jeffrey Davis' (is this our own Vandermolen?!) rounds off his review with a complaint about the neglect of Ruth Gipps by cd labels. The Fourth symphony "a wonderfully life-affirming and inspiriting score". "All the works by this composer that I have heard have been great". And quite frankly I have, personally, lost count of all the enthusiastic posts and reviews I have read, in various places, over the years, about this composer; so why no isn't her music being recorded?

This is indeed 'our own' Vandermolen, and he's absolutely right as far as I'm concerned. The neglect of Ruth Gipps is a pity, the only two recordings of her work (this Horn concerto and the Second Symphony) cry for more, as do the recordings in the archives of this forum (among them Symphonies Nos. 3, 4 and 5). Especially Symphony No. 4 is exactly as he describes it. So, what we wait for is a record company that serves us with more Ruth Gipps, Williams Wordsworth, and Stanley Bate, to mention my own top priorities.
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
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« Reply #81 on: September 28, 2013, 02:17:51 pm »

You will obviously get no disagreement from me regarding Ruth Gipps.....and William Wordsworth and Stanley Bate Grin Grin

I think it is a tad unfair to say "it certainly does not fit into the Cooke, Fricker, Jones bracket". These composers can only be 'bracketed' as neglected; their music is very different. I think that if one were to talk about British composers whose music demonstrates some indications of the influence of Vaughan Williams then Gipps, Wordsworth and Bate would certainly fall into that category....but then, to an extent, one could argue that so does that of Daniel Jones Smiley
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #82 on: September 28, 2013, 10:18:05 pm »


At this moment I'm still listening to a composer I had never, until yesterday, heard of. And whose very name is not even mentioned in Tomás Marco's Historia de las música española, siglo XX (Tome 6) - that I bought during a conference in Málaga in the Summer of 2000 and that I use as my main reference book regarding modern composers from Spain - let alone his music.

Yesterday in The Hague, I found a cd with four of orchestral works by composer Emilio Lehmberg or Emilio Lehmberg Ruíz (1905-1959), the son of a survivor of the shipwreck of the German frigate 'Gneisenau', that sunk in front of the port of Málaga on 16 December 1900. This marine, Lehmberg senior, married a daughter of the Ruiz-Rodríguez family that welcomed him, and their son is apparently a local name in Málaga, where a street is named after him. The most substantial piece on the cd is his only Symphony, the four-movement Sinfonía, finished a short time before his death in 1959. Of course, they are performed by the Orquesta Filarmónica de Málaga, under director José Luis Temes (Verso 2067).

One of the three other pieces on the cd is a Suite Andaluza from 1942 in five parts, number four a 'Bolero' that sounds uncanningly familiar. Let's say that he found his inspiration in a piece that also heavily inspired Uno Klami's '3 Beaufort' or 'Force 3', part six of the Sea PicturesWink
Quite a lot of that CD is available to listen to on YT: here's a link to one part -
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« Reply #83 on: September 29, 2013, 04:55:15 pm »

Quite a lot of that CD is available to listen to on YT: here's a link to one part -

You're right, this is the CD I am talking about. And here's the Bolero I was referring at, from the Suite Andaluza from 1942, please draw your own conclusion:

BTW, the first three movements are very much in the style of the two ballets from Manuel de Falla, sounding almost like free variations on some of its themes, so Lehmberg clearly allowed himself to be inspired by well-known sources. Let's call him 'eclectic', his 1959 Symphony very much in the style of Brahms. At the same time, his music is attractive enough to reward repeated listening.
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
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« Reply #84 on: September 30, 2013, 08:52:54 pm »

I've been working my way through the piano sonatas of Samuil Feinberg, who I find a fascinating figure for reasons I can't quite put my finger on. Well, maybe it is that early Soviet period in general that seems so strange and wonderful.
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kyjo
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« Reply #85 on: September 30, 2013, 09:07:45 pm »

I've been working my way through the piano sonatas of Samuil Feinberg, who I find a fascinating figure for reasons I can't quite put my finger on. Well, maybe it is that early Soviet period in general that seems so strange and wonderful.

Yes, the Feinberg sonatas are great works that remind me of Scriabin on LSD! Grin
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tapiola
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« Reply #86 on: September 30, 2013, 11:50:42 pm »

Curious kyjo, which composers do you not like?
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kyjo
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« Reply #87 on: October 01, 2013, 12:02:41 am »

Curious kyjo, which composers do you not like?

Stockhausen, Boulez, Xenakis and other members of the Darmstadt school, any of the "spectralist" composers, R. Strauss (I actually like J. Strauss better, believe it or not!), Webern, Offenbach, Rossini, Verdi, Tavener, Part, Telemann, most Medieval and Renaissance composers are who immediately come to mind.
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tapiola
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« Reply #88 on: October 01, 2013, 01:09:57 am »

Well, I think you have a healthy appetite for many types of serious music. A very open mind. I agree with most of the ones you dislike except the Renaissance.
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kyjo
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« Reply #89 on: October 01, 2013, 01:56:48 am »

Well, I think you have a healthy appetite for many types of serious music. A very open mind. I agree with most of the ones you dislike except the Renaissance.

Thank you! I haven't really given Renaissance music a fair shake yet; some of it is quite beautiful, though I can only take it in small doses.
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