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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14719 times)
tapiola
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« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2013, 07:04:01 pm »

Cyrillus Kreek.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #46 on: August 24, 2013, 09:27:33 pm »

Cyrillus Kreek.

Isn't that a who rather than a what Huh Smiley Smiley

If it is, by any chance, the Estonian Requiem I would value your assessment. I fell in love with the piece Smiley
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« Reply #47 on: September 01, 2013, 02:39:45 pm »

Listening now to a, I think powerful modern symphony, but very much respecting music history.
It's written for baritone solo and orchestra by Olli Mustonen.

Everytime the Fins surprise me with music I like so much!

Here is link to YT. I think there will be a recording on cd very soon (Ondine?)



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tapiola
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« Reply #48 on: September 01, 2013, 04:01:09 pm »

I listened to the Setu Symphony and some Psalms of David. I want to listen to the Requiem again and then comment.
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kyjo
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« Reply #49 on: September 02, 2013, 05:40:54 am »

In an attempt to warm up to Havergal Brian's later style, I listened to his Symphony no. 14 (which in only available in the Archive) tonight. All I can say is more power to those that can get something out of Brian's later works! Grin This and pretty much all post-Symphony no. 6 works leave me cold, for the most part. Sad I did like the section in the middle with the harp floating mysteriously above the low brass, but that's about it.
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« Reply #50 on: September 02, 2013, 01:48:25 pm »

Lou Harrison - Easter Cantata & Mass to St. Anthony.

 Directed that way from the Hauer thread via YT, & reminded what a pleasure Harrison can be !
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Clive
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« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2013, 02:02:09 pm »

In an attempt to warm up to Havergal Brian's later style, I listened to his Symphony no. 14 (which in only available in the Archive) tonight. All I can say is more power to those that can get something out of Brian's later works! Grin This and pretty much all post-Symphony no. 6 works leave me cold, for the most part. Sad I did like the section in the middle with the harp floating mysteriously above the low brass, but that's about it.

The 14th-strictly speaking-is mid-period Brian Grin The later Brian would be from around No.22 onwards. I too have some problems with later Brian. I would not say that the later symphonies "leave me cold" but their elusive nature take some "getting into". The 14th, which was Malcolm MacDonald's least favourite Brian symphony, actually rather appeals to me in its somewhat bombastic idiom Grin But I am rather surprised that you obviously don't rate Nos. 7-9 which are amongst my favourite Brian symphonies and, in my opinion, his best. These really are marvellous works to my ears Smiley
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« Reply #52 on: September 02, 2013, 03:25:48 pm »

No 14 is one of my favourites! Huh Sad Grin It took me years & years to crack open these later symphonies. Probably about 25 years at least! (Makes me sound intelligent,doesn't it?! Grin). Despite the enthusiasm of the HB Society and various 'Brianites',I thought they all sounded the same. To me,Brian had just simply run out of good ideas. (No 16 and No21 were honourable exceptions,thanks to those excellent Lp recordings!)
  Anyway,years later I had a pc & and a cd/dvd writer,and thanks to the enthusiasm of Johan,over at the GMG forum,and the ability to compile cds (via the downloads here) of the symphonies in order.......lo and behold,in true Arabian Nights style (well,sort of! Grin) these indecipherable,gritty,samey sounding late symphonies mysteriously 'opened up'. And,let me tell you,it was wierd the way it happened. I had tried for years to no avail. Suddenly,almost overnight,I was enjoying them!! The sheer variety of ideas and mood. The colour and individuality of Brian's muse. It was like a magic casement opening up. And I'm not exaggerating! I have never experienced anything like this with any other composer. Now I actually prefer them to allot of the earlier symphonies!! Huh Shocked Grin

It's wierd!! Grin
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kyjo
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« Reply #53 on: September 05, 2013, 02:52:20 am »

Just finished listening to Pascal Bentoiu's Symphony no. 1 on YT. Interesting piece to say the least. Lots of interesting sonorities, including the prominence of a group of saxophones which give the work a jazzy edge. Apparently, Bentoiu's later symphonies are more "difficult" than his earlier ones and I didn't exactly find no. 1 to be "easy" in any regard, so we'll see how that goes!

BTW: The Electrecord channel on YT doesn't mark the movement numbers, which is rather frustrating. I did some sleuthing and found them here: http://www.bestmusic.ro/pascal-bentoiu/discografie-pascal-bentoiu/album-8-simfonii-si-un-poem-cd-1-63014.html (The track listings of subsequent CDs can be found by scrolling down to the bottom of the page.)
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« Reply #54 on: September 06, 2013, 01:48:05 am »

Quote
It took me years & years to crack open these later symphonies. Probably about 25 years at least! (Makes me sound intelligent,doesn't it?! Grin). Despite the enthusiasm of the HB Society and various 'Brianites',I thought they all sounded the same. To me,Brian had just simply run out of good ideas. (No 16 and No21 were honourable exceptions,thanks to those excellent Lp recordings!)
  Anyway,years later I had a pc & and a cd/dvd writer,and thanks to the enthusiasm of Johan,over at the GMG forum,and the ability to compile cds (via the downloads here) of the symphonies in order.......lo and behold,in true Arabian Nights style (well,sort of! Grin) these indecipherable,gritty,samey sounding late symphonies mysteriously 'opened up'. And,let me tell you,it was wierd the way it happened. I had tried for years to no avail. Suddenly,almost overnight,I was enjoying them!! The sheer variety of ideas and mood. The colour and individuality of Brian's muse. It was like a magic casement opening up. And I'm not exaggerating! I have never experienced anything like this with any other composer. Now I actually prefer them to allot of the earlier symphonies!! Huh Shocked Grin

It's wierd!! Grin

Bravo! Persistence does pay off sometimes!
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tapiola
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« Reply #55 on: September 06, 2013, 03:08:19 am »

As promised, the Kreek Requiem was a mixed bag. Very fine choral writing and brass work. Very simple folk-based and real folksongs as themes. I was much disturbed by the constant "Big Ben" motif recurring over and over again.  Does that have some meaning in Estonia?  All and all an interesting listen but nothing I would return to often.
Kreek seems a purely Estonian interest.
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« Reply #56 on: September 07, 2013, 02:57:03 am »

For the umpteenth time Grin Grin one of my all-time favourite works:

Miloslav Kabelac's Passacaglia "The Mystery of Time" Smiley

Powerful, imposing, granitic, terrifying Grin

His recording is admittedly showing its age but my goodness, how Karel Ancerl nailed this piece with his Czech Philharmonic Orchestra back in 1960. Magnificent blaring brass, hammered timpani, the pieces works its way to such an overwhelming climax and then slowly winds back down, its intensity spent, towards the same mysterious, other-worldly regions as it had began.

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kyjo
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« Reply #57 on: September 07, 2013, 03:22:44 am »

Indeed, the granitic power of the Kabelac could never be doubted Smiley A true masterpiece!

Just finished listening to Bentoiu's Symphony no. 2. I liked this one better than no. 1; it's more accessible with some nice jazzy chords and groovy rhythms. Cool
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« Reply #58 on: September 08, 2013, 09:05:00 am »

Yes, love the Kabelac, Mr. D !

Similarly gorgeous Sunday listening (stolen from another thread !) - Gavin Bryars 'The North Shore'.
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Clive
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« Reply #59 on: September 08, 2013, 11:38:22 pm »

"Mystery of Time" really does deserve a modern recording. There is an alternative version available taken from a radio broadcast with the Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra under Vladimir Valek but it is a much lower voltage, more careful and cautious performance. What Ancerl achieves so magnificently in the 1960 recording is to gradually but inexorably screw up the tension as the work proceeds towards its shattering central climax. The Czech PO in its full glory attack the score with total commitment and if the brass appear in this recording somewhat "blaring" then I actually think that suits the music Grin They slice through the pulse of the music in a way which I find quite terrifying.

Actually (for the first time tonight....yes, I know, again Grin) I noticed some similarities between the Kabelac and some later Martinu-the Martinu of the 1950s(the Frescoes, Parables and the Epic of Gilgamesh).
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