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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 14633 times)
kyjo
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« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2013, 07:59:08 pm »

It is the only orchestral Bacon commercially available and is a moving, accessible piece which I strongly recommend also.

His Elegy Remembering Ansel Adams for clarinet and strings is available on a CRI CD. I agree with you about Bacon. His music is the same accessibility level as "populist" Copland, Harris or Ward but is overall deeper and less brash than the aforementioned composers. Smiley
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2013, 08:59:20 pm »

.....and indeed the Elegy's recording is duly noted in my catalogue of Bacon's orchestral music Roll Eyes Embarrassed Smiley

I am trying to juggle too many balls at the same time these days Grin  Your eagle-eye saves me from egregious error Smiley
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Jim
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« Reply #32 on: August 22, 2013, 01:58:26 am »

Melartin 4 and Peterson-Berger 3 are two outright gorgeous compositions and are the epitome of Nordic romanticism Smiley Are you familiar with their other symphonies, Jim? How about the Atterberg symphonies?

I was only familiar with Peterson-Berger 2 before; have 4 to give a proper listening but never heard 1 or 5. Will be working my way through all Melartin's symphonies when I get the chance.

I have been meaning to explore Atterberg! I have downloaded symphonies 1, 6 and 8 and the PC - but with so much to listen to not managed it yet! Anything you can recommend as representative of his best work?
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kyjo
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« Reply #33 on: August 22, 2013, 02:41:18 am »

I have been meaning to explore Atterberg! I have downloaded symphonies 1, 6 and 8 and the PC - but with so much to listen to not managed it yet! Anything you can recommend as representative of his best work?

I'm the Atterberg man around here Grin, so I'd be happy to give you some recommendations Smiley The complete symphonies set on CPO is essential listening as far as I'm concerned. My favorite Atterberg symphony and a good starting point IMO is the Third (subtitled West Coast Pictures), which is an breathtakingly gorgeous piece with some vivid nature painting. From there, I would explore the symphonies in this order: 2, 5, 1, 6, 4, 8, 7, 9. I highly recommend the three CPO discs which supplement the symphonies cycle (the main works on each of them are the PC, the VC and the Symphony for Strings). The PC is a hyper-romantic work in the vein of Rachmaninov which boasts some memorable melodies. The VC is a highly-charged, intense work on a symphonic scale with the typical Atterbergian soaring melodies. So, in summary, dig into these first:

      

If you catch the Atterberg bug (which I guarantee you will Wink), snap these up after exploring the recordings pictured above:

            

I'd say Atterberg's five best works are:

1. Symphony no. 3
2. Symphony no. 2
3. Piano Concerto
4. Symphony no. 5
5. Violin Concerto

But that's just my own opinion, of course! Just let me know if you need any more help with recommendations. Happy listening! Smiley
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Latvian
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« Reply #34 on: August 22, 2013, 06:57:54 pm »

Listening in my car on the way to and from work today... Mongolian symphonic music.

Music of Sharav and Murdorj from YouTube downloads burned to CDR, and the two Gonchigsumlaa symphonies, burned to CDR from Melodiya LPs. Very nice!
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kyjo
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« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2013, 07:12:12 pm »

Listening in my car on the way to and from work today... Mongolian symphonic music.

Music of Sharav and Murdorj from YouTube downloads burned to CDR, and the two Gonchigsumlaa symphonies, burned to CDR from Melodiya LPs. Very nice!

Yes, that YT channel which contains super-rare Mongolian music is a little treasure trove! The Gonchiksumla (however you spell it Grin) symphonies are remarkable for the influence of RVW (of all composers!) that permeates them.
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Jim
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« Reply #36 on: August 23, 2013, 01:56:12 am »

Thanks Kyjo, CPO set of Atterberg symphonies duly ordered!
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kyjo
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« Reply #37 on: August 23, 2013, 01:59:31 am »

Thanks Kyjo, CPO set of Atterberg symphonies duly ordered!

Some truly marvelous music awaits your ears!  I'd be interested to hear what you think of this set once you get a chance to listen to it. I wouldn't be surprised if you will be as bowled over as much as I was at first hearing. Smiley
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tapiola
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« Reply #38 on: August 23, 2013, 05:26:41 am »

No. 3 blows my mind open every time I hear it. No. 5 is the masterpiece of the group. 6,7 and 8 are great fun and No. 9 is still a tough nut for me to crack.
The Piano Concerto is one of the finest ultra-Romantic concertos ever written. Amazingly beautiful!
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kyjo
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« Reply #39 on: August 23, 2013, 06:05:18 am »

No. 3 blows my mind open every time I hear it. No. 5 is the masterpiece of the group. 6,7 and 8 are great fun and No. 9 is still a tough nut for me to crack.
The Piano Concerto is one of the finest ultra-Romantic concertos ever written. Amazingly beautiful!

Totally agreed. No. 9 will come as a shock to anyone expecting the luscious late-romanticism of the other symphonies. I'm not too fond of the vocal aspect of it either; vocal writing was not one of Atterberg's strong suits, I suppose. But then again, he couldn't be a perfect composer! Wink
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JimL
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« Reply #40 on: August 24, 2013, 07:15:22 am »

The Atterberg symphonies (and I haven't heard every one yet, but based entirely on what I've heard so far) constitute one of the great neglected symphony cycles of the 20th Century.
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« Reply #41 on: August 24, 2013, 07:41:19 am »

Atterbergs life-asserting music is in a class all by itself..and I would describe it as ultra-romantic. It is one of the first things I would play for someone who was not fond of "classical music" and have done so with some of my freinds..all reacting positively to it.
While the symphonies are a wonderful creation (excludsing no 9) I think something of shorter duration might lure them in.
These two fine pieces did the trick:
En värmlandsrapsodi, Op.36 (1933) (A Värmland Rhapsody) 8'35
Ballad utan ord, Op.56 (1957-58) (Ballad Without Words)
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #42 on: August 24, 2013, 07:49:35 am »

Presently listening to the 2nd of 3 symphonies by Christopher Rouse..Highly animated, jabbing, desolate piece, but quite a treat!
Generally, Rouse's music is an assault on the senses, but it is unique, cleverly written and quite accessable (for me, at least)
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Elroel
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« Reply #43 on: August 24, 2013, 10:06:25 am »

Ştefan Neaga - Poemul Nistrolui

A very romantic piece of music. It is also very Romanian, but that doesn't look strange, because before WW2 is was Romanian territory. In the most of Moldavia Romanian is the language of the people..

The Music Conservatorium in the captial Chisinau is named after him.
His lesser known than Georgi Neaga (most of the time known as Nyaga.
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kyjo
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« Reply #44 on: August 24, 2013, 05:58:13 pm »

The Atterberg symphonies (and I haven't heard every one yet, but based entirely on what I've heard so far) constitute one of the great neglected symphony cycles of the 20th Century.

+1 Smiley
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