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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 13840 times)
Neil McGowan
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« Reply #615 on: February 28, 2015, 05:13:28 pm »

I'm giving Shigeaki Saegusa's opera CHUSINGURA a listen.

I can't say I am enjoying it that much - but we need to persevere with things which don't immediately appeal.
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dhibbard
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« Reply #616 on: February 28, 2015, 07:24:57 pm »

on this Texas Independence Weekend...I'm discovering the Phono Suecia series... Rosenberg, Melchers, Skold, Erland Von Koch... nice collection of Swedish composers.
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #617 on: February 28, 2015, 11:36:18 pm »

I'm giving Shigeaki Saegusa's opera CHUSINGURA a listen.

I can't say I am enjoying it that much - but we need to persevere with things which don't immediately appeal.

Saegusa's popularity in Japan is due mainly to this soundtrack

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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #618 on: March 01, 2015, 07:26:28 am »

Yes, exactly Sad   The main fault with his opera is the abysmal comic-book libretto Sad
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shamus
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« Reply #619 on: March 01, 2015, 04:01:05 pm »

Found several pieces by Máximo Flügelman 1950-, (born Argentina, educated Switzerland, now I think in USA) on SoundCloud, enjoying them a lot.
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ahinton
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« Reply #620 on: March 01, 2015, 04:58:52 pm »

Yes, exactly Sad   The main fault with his opera is the abysmal comic-book libretto Sad
I could hardly agree more - makes even Michael Tippett as librettist like da Ponte, Hofmannsthal and other luminaries of the profession all rolled into one (though somehow his remarkable shortcomings in this still don't manage to detract from the wonders of The Midsummer Marriage - at least for me...)
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #621 on: March 01, 2015, 07:20:06 pm »

still don't manage to detract from the wonders of The Midsummer Marriage - at least for me...

Or from King Priam - whose libretto is one of Tippett's more successful attempts, with a score that does the topic justice.
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ahinton
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« Reply #622 on: March 01, 2015, 07:28:14 pm »

still don't manage to detract from the wonders of The Midsummer Marriage - at least for me...

Or from King Priam - whose libretto is one of Tippett's more successful attempts, with a score that does the topic justice.
It does indeed; I'm not especially fond of much of it, I have to admit, but it certainly works well. From that point onwards, it seems to have been downhill all the way in terms of his stage works, in terms both of libretti and music, yet certain other works still show that the sparks of magic had by no means eluded him altogether (fourth piano sonata, fourth symphony, last two quartets, triple concerto et al).

Anyway - Lekeu: Sonata for violin and piano - one of his last works. It's hard not to try to imagine how the composer might have developed had he survived beyond the age of 23. I'm not sure that he quite qualifies as an "obscure" composer but I do believe that his work, even today, remains less well known than it deserves to be...
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guest54
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« Reply #623 on: March 02, 2015, 04:33:57 am »

Lekeu: Sonata for violin and piano - one of his last works. It's hard not to try to imagine how the composer might have developed had he survived beyond the age of 23. I'm not sure that he quite qualifies as an "obscure" composer but I do believe that his work, even today, remains less well known than it deserves to be...

We agree. There's something about the Belgians.
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ahinton
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« Reply #624 on: March 02, 2015, 07:29:44 am »

Lekeu: Sonata for violin and piano - one of his last works. It's hard not to try to imagine how the composer might have developed had he survived beyond the age of 23. I'm not sure that he quite qualifies as an "obscure" composer but I do believe that his work, even today, remains less well known than it deserves to be...

We agree. There's something about the Belgians.
The Dutch would doubtless agree, but not quite in the sense that I take you to mean it here...
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Christo
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« Reply #625 on: March 02, 2015, 07:09:45 pm »

The Dutch would doubtless agree, but not quite in the sense that I take you to mean it here...
Well. At least more than just somethingSmiley
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #626 on: March 17, 2015, 03:29:38 am »

Distinctive danish  flavor
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #627 on: May 17, 2015, 12:43:25 am »

I know of Vladimir Jurovski only bombastic Symphony n°4 (perhaps old Melodiya 's lp sound).IMHO this is a great improvement and i hope that Mikhail would record more of his father.There are echoes of Shostakovich and Kabalevsky but Jurovski had his own Language,i can't see connection with Brezhnev's Czech of 1968 also if undoubtedly Symphony has a somber tone and there are sardonic military marches.

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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #628 on: October 22, 2015, 01:52:49 pm »

Delightful
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #629 on: June 16, 2018, 12:29:18 pm »

Playing here,now. The 1966 BBC complete recording,with dialogue,of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Gondoliers. These recordings are imho,vastly superior to the 1989 BBC Series (good as they are). The characterisation's,the liveliness of the interpretations,and the acting of the dialogue is superb. I'm pro-dialogue,when it comes to operetta,but even I have to admit that allot of the dialogue in the old D'Oyly Carte recordings is a bit of a yawn! The delivery of the dialogue in the 1966 recordings is so good I'll actually find myself listening to every word. The key? They treat it as a radio play,rather than just a,let's do the dialogue read-through. If you ignore the quaint introductory narration's (in an old school BBC posh accent) which I find fun;and the fact that the most of the character's dialogue is actually performed by actors (not the singers themselves) with the notable exception of Peter Pratt; these are very probably the best performances of G & S dialogue ever,period! In fact,if the dialogue had been performed this well on the commercial recordings that were released,it might have been more popular with music lovers,who usually find it tedious and boring! And as I say,the performances are absolutely superb. I would even go so far as to say,fan of the old D'Oyly Carte as I am,that these are among the best G & S recordings of the last sixty years (taken as a whole). And Peter Pratt performing the patter songs! Smiley The Recording of The Pirates of Penzance is the one big disappointment,with Vilem Tausky conducting,and no Peter Pratt. But no one can replace Owen Brannigan,in the role of the Sergeant Major,for me,anyway!! The good news? While the recordings have never been released commercially,they can be downloaded for free,in very clear mono from the internet. I'm not telling you where;but if you want to hear them,just put 1966 BBC Gilbert and Sullivan into Google (other search engines are available! Grin) and you'll find them. Unfortunately,one half of the recording of The Grand Duke is actually the D'Oyly Carte recording! Sad The remainder are in very clear mono!
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