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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 13834 times)
cjvinthechair
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« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2013, 11:17:02 am »

Ingvar Lidholm - Poesis per orchestra - on a 2nd hand BIS disc bought yesterday.
 I'm trying, but it might be £4 that could have been put towards a G&T at the Prom last night !

Thanks for 'steer' to Toduta - anything for organ works for me - and the Channel it's on, the output of which appears prodigious !
Also to Peter Mieg - new name. Think I'm going to like this thread !
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Clive
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« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2013, 11:47:11 am »

anything for organ works for me
Including the three symphonies for organ solo by Sorabji? (of which the first's been recorded, performed and broadcast, the second's been performed and the third awaits performance)...
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2013, 12:01:22 pm »

anything for organ works for me
Including the three symphonies for organ solo by Sorabji? (of which the first's been recorded, performed and broadcast, the second's been performed and the third awaits performance)...
Ah - you have much the better of me there. Scarcely know the name..and what I can find on YT doesn't seem to involve the organ.
 Do I sense that you assume there's not a snowball's chance that I'll like them ? Probably right, but I'd welcome the chance to try (without vast expense, of course!).
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Clive
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« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2013, 02:15:06 am »

Ingvar Lidholm - Poesis per orchestra - on a 2nd hand BIS disc bought yesterday.
 I'm trying, but it might be £4 that could have been put towards a G&T at the Prom last night !

Thanks for 'steer' to Toduta - anything for organ works for me - and the Channel it's on, the output of which appears prodigious !
Also to Peter Mieg - new name. Think I'm going to like this thread !
Try this post at radio broadcasts for fine lyrical organ concerto

http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,2976.0.html
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kyjo
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« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2013, 03:48:09 am »

Now: Robert Simpson's Flute Concerto on YT, of which there exists no commercial recording. I'm still trying to get my head around Simpson's intricate yet imposing music.

Next: Jacques Hetu's Organ Concerto.
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albert
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« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2013, 10:00:20 am »

Listening to Berwald Septet in preparation for attending a live performance. Much rewarded by the work.
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2013, 11:29:40 am »


Try this post at radio broadcasts for fine lyrical organ concerto

http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,2976.0.html

Thanks - I have it downloaded from somewhere; delightful indeed !

Listening while I write : Vissarion Shebalin - A Capella Choral Cycles...beautifully refreshing music !
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Clive
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« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2013, 07:11:30 pm »

This month I have been enjoying Nordic symphonies; Melartin 4, Peterson-Berger 3, plus the marvelous two Merikanto pieces uploaded here.

Whilst on holiday I revisited some of my favourite Malcolm Arnold and in particular a piece that I hadn't listened to for quite a number of years - the Serenade for guitar and strings, a lovely melancholy miniature.
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kyjo
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« Reply #23 on: August 15, 2013, 07:42:24 pm »

This month I have been enjoying Nordic symphonies; Melartin 4, Peterson-Berger 3, plus the marvelous two Merikanto pieces uploaded here.

Whilst on holiday I revisited some of my favourite Malcolm Arnold and in particular a piece that I hadn't listened to for quite a number of years - the Serenade for guitar and strings, a lovely melancholy miniature.

Melartin 4 and Peterson-Berger 3 are two outright gorgeous compositions and are the epitome of Nordic romanticism Smiley Are you familiar with their other symphonies, Jim? How about the Atterberg symphonies?
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kyjo
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« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2013, 04:37:48 am »

I've really been getting into the music of Latvian composer Romualds Kalsons (1936-) lately. His earlier works take Prokofiev and Shostakovich as their points of departure, but, more recently, Kalsons' style has evolved into a lushly melodic brand of neo-romanticism which produces quite beautiful results. Today I listened to his Concerto Grosso for Trumpet, French Horn and Orchestra (available in our DLs) and his Retrospection for orchestra (available on YT). The former begins dark and Shostakovichian, but the mood soon lightens with some grin-inducing Prokofievian irony along the way. The latter piece belongs to Kalsons' neo-romantic period and begins with a lengthy, mysterious clarinet solo which leads into a slow, melancholy waltz which is an obvious homage to Sibelius' Valse triste. The bright, propulsive energy of the middle section comes as a surprise, but it soon comes to a halt with a reprise of the waltz theme. The solo clarinet gives the last word of this beautiful piece in which not a note is wasted. BTW there are two other Kalsons pieces besides Retrospection which are not available on CD or for DL here than can be found on YT:

Wedding Songs for orchestra:




Cantata Parting Words for soprano, men's chorus and orchestra:





Kalsons is a composer well worth your time! Smiley
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kyjo
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« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2013, 05:18:15 am »



Just finished listening to Fantasia for Double Orchestra (my second listening of this work). I honestly don't know what to think of Simon Bainbridge's complex music. It has a hypnotic, almost surrealist quality that I fail to comprehend. It's unlike anything else I've ever heard. At the moment, I'm not really convinced persevering with Bainbridge's music will yield many rewards. There's just so much better music out there, such as what's next on my listening schedule:



I was finally able to get ahold of this incredibly hard-to-find disc of some of Atterberg's "lighter" music. It's always good to return to old friends like Atterberg after a day of listening to composers like Tüür and Bainbridge. Atterberg's music never fails to warm my heart Smiley The Siciliano from the Suite Barocco is five minutes of pure heavenly beauty Smiley
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« Reply #26 on: August 20, 2013, 07:07:03 pm »

Finished listening to Bettinelli's Inno IV. Beautiful choral work (Do you know it Clive?)
Now I start from the same composer his Terza Cantata for chorus and orchestra. This one more complex and it sounds also more modern, both inthe instrumental as the vocal parts
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #27 on: August 20, 2013, 07:49:40 pm »

Mr. Kyjo - thanks for the steer towards some Kalsons pieces I've not encountered.
Mr Elroel - most kind of you to think of me...not quite sure (memory & old age !) how I was led to Bettinelli recently, but have discovered the pieces you mention, and yes, they're well worth a few minutes of your time.
Simon Bainbridge - didn't have much in common with his 'Garden of Earthly Delights' from the Proms. As stated...there's so much out there well worth attention, why spend too long on those who don't appeal so much ! Prefer some of the RAM students' pieces which he sometimes conducts !
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Clive
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« Reply #28 on: August 21, 2013, 07:26:23 pm »

I don't normally post this kind of thing  Grin  but...........

I have been listening to my own digitised version of the old LP version of Ernst Bacon's "Ford's Theatre" in honour of the fine composer whose music is so utterly neglected and whose widow has exchanged a number of charming emails with me

....and the new CPO version of Panufnik's marvellous, grand and imposing Sinfonia della Speranza: which I strongly recommend to those who don't know the work Smiley
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2013, 07:36:22 pm »

I should have added that "Ford's Theatre"(or "Theater" in American Grin) is available in a modern Naxos version played by the Nashville Symphony Orchestra/Leonard Slatkin.

It is the only orchestral Bacon commercially available and is a moving, accessible piece which I strongly recommend also.
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