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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 13832 times)
kyjo
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« on: August 12, 2013, 05:00:08 am »

I know I'm obviously plagiarizing GMG here, but what are you currently listening to? Lately I've been catching up with listening to the recent uploads here. Right now I'm listening to the upload of Yegveny Tikotsky's (1893-1970) Symphony no. 6. After a strident opening, the first movement settles into a melodic, folsky mood with very little dissonance compared to the opening. Delightful so far, if nothing revelatory.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2013, 06:29:43 am »

At the moment, listening to Sigismund Toduta Concerto no.4 for string Orchestra and Organ via Utube..
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Bosque Bill
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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 06:36:57 am »

Luc Brewaey's vibrant, colorful "recompositions" for orchestra of Debussy preludes (a 2-CD set on the obscure Talent label), Alfred Newman's classic film score "The Robe" (even Aaron Copland regarded Newman as an exceptional American composer) and Bloch's "Three Jewish Poems" (Atlas conducting, on the ASV label). Good listening all around, especially after a long, tiring, six-day work week!
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kyjo
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 06:39:57 am »

At the moment, listening to Sigismund Toduta Concerto no.4 for string Orchestra and Organ via Utube..

I would really like to hear more of Toduta's music. I own this Electrecord CD which contains the Concerto no. 4:



Interesting music. It sort of sounds like as if Bartok had studied Romanian folk music and absorbed influences from Renaissance polyphony.
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kyjo
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« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2013, 06:52:28 am »

Luc Brewaey's vibrant, colorful "recompositions" for orchestra of Debussy preludes (a 2-CD set on the obscure Talent label), Alfred Newman's classic film score "The Robe" (even Aaron Copland regarded Newman as an exceptional American composer) and Bloch's "Three Jewish Poems" (Atlas conducting, on the ASV label). Good listening all around, especially after a long, tiring, six-day work week!

Nice variety there, Bill! I haven't been able to get ahold of a copy of that Talent set, but I have heard Colin Matthews' magical orchestrations of the Debussy Preludes, which take the music to a whole new dimension. As you can see by my avatar, Bloch is a composer whose music I never seem to tire of. He put his soul into every single one of his compositions, producing music of both great purity and passion. Smiley
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Latvian
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2013, 01:45:56 pm »

Swiss composer Peter Mieg, specifically the Piano Concerti. A pleasant recent discovery on YT.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2013, 06:44:40 pm »

Swiss composer Peter Mieg, specifically the Piano Concerti. A pleasant recent discovery on YT.
yes..a great find, somewhat in the mold of Frank Martin but much less edgy from what I can gather.
Is that what you hear?
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Elroel
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« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2013, 12:20:57 am »

3 Avie cd's have my attention right now. All with music of Hans Gál
I'm listening to part 3 Elegie of the 1st symphony
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2013, 02:16:07 pm »

Quote
Quote
Swiss composer Peter Mieg, specifically the Piano Concerti. A pleasant recent discovery on YT.

yes..a great find, somewhat in the mold of Frank Martin but much less edgy from what I can gather.
Is that what you hear?

Yes, that's a good assessment. I hear some Poulenc in there, too.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2013, 07:42:50 pm »

Quote
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Swiss composer Peter Mieg, specifically the Piano Concerti. A pleasant recent discovery on YT.

yes..a great find, somewhat in the mold of Frank Martin but much less edgy from what I can gather.
Is that what you hear?

Yes, that's a good assessment. I hear some Poulenc in there, too.
Yes, that certainly explains the reason it is less edgy than Martin,maybe a very slight dab of Francaix's style as well
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kyjo
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« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2013, 09:47:49 pm »

Speaking of Frank Martin, the music of the sadly neglected Quebecois composer Jacques Hetu (1938-2010), which I've been beginning to explore recently, reminds me in places of the Swiss composer's difficult-to-pin-down style.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2013, 10:47:21 pm »

Speaking of Frank Martin, the music of the sadly neglected Quebecois composer Jacques Hetu (1938-2010), which I've been beginning to explore recently, reminds me in places of the Swiss composer's difficult-to-pin-down style.
Hetu's hybrid style of Frank Martin, Olivier Messiaen, Henri Dutilleux and other Frenchmen(esp) is unique and unlike any other music you may hear. (He studied with the latter 2.) I think "intoxicating" would not be innacurate descriptor.
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kyjo
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« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2013, 04:09:57 am »

Now: Going to sample some of Isang Yun's music on YT before purchasing any recordings of it (I've been looking into the complete symphonies on CPO). I've heard it's noisy and very dissonant, so I should approach with caution, I guess! I'll try his Symphony no. 2.

Next: Jacques Hetu's Clarinet Concerto, and, if time allows, his Organ Concerto.

Later: Going to end on a lighter note with some Respighi:



I'll be listening to The Birds tonight.
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kyjo
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« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2013, 05:16:16 am »

Now: Going to sample some of Isang Yun's music on YT before purchasing any recordings of it (I've been looking into the complete symphonies on CPO). I've heard it's noisy and very dissonant, so I should approach with caution, I guess! I'll try his Symphony no. 2.

Not bad at all, in fact, quite fascinating music! Maybe it is one of Yun's more accessible works, as it didn't strike me as "excessively dissonant" or "noisy". Surprisingly enough, I was reminded of Havergal Brian's stream-of-consciousness style of composing. I'll be picking up some CDs of Yun's music for sure! Smiley
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2013, 05:55:37 am »

Listening to Finzi's and Copland's Clarinet Concertos.
Thorougly relaxing and mesmerizing...this is nite nite time music..
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