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Belarusian Music


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Author Topic: Belarusian Music  (Read 3069 times)
christopher
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« Reply #45 on: August 17, 2016, 06:01:47 pm »

I have posted up a song by Anton Mikhaylavich Valynchyk (1896-1985) - "Old Lime Trees" ("Lipy Stariya") - a capella.

from wikipedia (via google-translate):

Anton Valynchyk (July 23, 1896, d Myalkanavichy, Slonim -. November 13, 1985, Grodno) - choral conductor, composer, teacher, teacher Navahrudak Belarusian gymnasium.

He embodies the concert program includes works by J. Bach, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Schubert, Moniuszko, K. Weber. Processed Belarusian folk songs. He wrote and prepared to perform their songs and choruses on words of Yanka Kupala, Yakub Kolas, Adam Rusak, Petrus Brovki and other Belarusian poets. Practised in the choir performance in "a cappella" style [1].

Biography
Born into a family of church regent. After Zhirovichi seminary was drafted into the army, where 19-year-old boy led a soldier's chorus. After the army he returned to his homeland and in the period from 1939 to 1947. He worked as a teacher of music and singing in a real school in Luninets, then in Kletsk Belarusian gymnasium, then in Navahrudak Belarusian gymnasium, as well as the Belarusian teachers' seminary in Slonim. In 1937, Anton graduated from the Higher Valynchyk music courses at the Warsaw Conservatory of Music Kremenets Lyceum. During the Second World War he lived in Slonim, where he led various choirs.

After the war, he was artistic director of the Belarusian inter-provincial song and dance ensemble in Ashmyany. To avoid reprisals, he collaborated with the choirs of Orthodox churches in Kletsk, Novogrudok, Slonim, Zhirovitsy and Minsk. In 1956 the composer went to Mogilev region, where the leader of the choir got the Belarusian Agricultural Academy in Gorki. A year later he returned to Molodechno, where he became head of the inter-provincial Molodechno Song and Dance Ensemble, who led four years. In 1961 he moved to Grodno. There he headed the department of music and singing of the Grodno Pedagogical Institute, he worked as choirmaster at the same time the national Grodno "Neman" Song and Dance Ensemble (from the leadership of which was subsequently removed the Soviet nomenklatura) and artistic director of Grodno Folk Choir teachers. She advised as a choirmaster many Choir Grodno. Died November 13, 1985. He was buried in the town cemetery Grodno. On his grave there is a monument, delivered a simple iron cross. 
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christopher
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« Reply #46 on: August 17, 2016, 06:26:32 pm »

I have posted up some pieces by Vasil Zalatarou (Vasilii Zolotarev in Russian) - 1872-1964.

Rondo capricciso - possibly this piece is actually by Vladislav Zolotarev who was a composer for the bayan (a kind of accordion) - and this is clearly a bayan piece!
Pushkin's letter to the Decembrists from opera "The Decembrists"
Capriccio on Hebrew Melodies

Zolotarev's original surname was Kuyumzhi (Куюмжи).

from wikipedia:

Vasily Andreyevich Zolotarev, also romanized as Zolotaryov (Russian: Василий Андреевич Золотарёв; February 24, 1872 in Taganrog – May 25, 1964 in Moscow), was a Russian (Soviet) composer, music teacher, and People's Artist of Russia.

Vasily Zolotarev was born in the city of Taganrog in 1872. Studied music at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory under direction of Mily Balakirev (1893–1898) in the class of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1898–1900), graduating in 1900. Zolotarev lectured at Moscow Conservatory (1909–1918), at the Belarus State Academy of Music (Белорусская государственная консерватория им. А. В. Луначарского) in 1933–1941, and other conservatories. Among his students in Tashkent was Mieczysław Weinberg.[2]

Vasily Zolotarev is author of three operas, seven symphonies (1902–1962), three concerti, six string quartets, songs and other works.

Rhapsodie hébraïque
The New York Times wrote of Zolotarev's Rhapsodie hébraïque that it was "based on Hebrew melodies now used in Russia… among the Jewish families of the lower classes. … [Zolotarev] found that upon a Hebrew racial idiom there had been grafted some of the characteristic of Russian music just as the irreducible language of the Jews in any country is overlaid by a few words or modes of expression belonging to the land of their environment. Thus the melodies… are the musical equivalent of Yiddish." They described the melodies as "built upon an Oriental scale… [whose] earmark is an augmented interval instead of that found in the diatonic scale between the third and fourth notes.

Selected works
Stage
Decembrists (Декабристы), Opera (1925); new edition Kondrati Ryleev, 1957
Prince Lake (Князь-озеро), Ballet (1949); won the Stalin Prize in 1950
Orchestral
Fête villageoise (Деревенский праздник; Village Festival), Overture in F major, Op. 4 (1901)
Rhapsodie hébraïque (Еврейская рапсодия), Op. 7 (1903)
Symphony No. 1, Op. 8 (1903)
Ouverture-fantaisie, Op. 22 (1907)
Concertante
Concerto for cello and orchestra (1963)
Chamber music
Suite in the Form of Variations (Сюита в форме вариаций) for violin and piano, Op. 2 (1900)
String Quartet No. 1, Op. 5 (1901)
String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 6 (1902)
2 Novelettes for violin and piano, Op. 11 (1904)
Piano Quartet in D minor, Op. 13 (1905)
String Quintet in F minor for 2 violins, viola and 2 cellos, Op. 19 (1905)
String Quartet No. 3 in D major, Op. 25 (1908)
Trio for violin, viola and piano, Op. 28 (1910)
String Quartet No. 4 in B♭ major, Op. 33 (1913)
Eclogue (Эклога) for viola and piano, Op. 38 (1923)
Sonata for violin and piano, Op. 40 (1925)
String Quartet No. 5 in G major, Op. 46 (1930)
Capriccio on a Hebrew Melody (Каприччио на еврейскую мелодию) for violin and piano (1938)
Trio for violin, cello and piano (1953)
String Quartet No. 6 "on Russian Folk Themes" (на русские народные темы) (1959)
Poème (Поэма) for cello and piano (1962)
Piano
Sonata [No. 1], Op. 10 (1904)
Trois Préludes (Три прелюдии) Op. 18 (1905)
Ukrainian Songs (Украинские песни), 30 Short Pieces for piano 4-hands, Op. 15 (1925)
Sonata No. 2, Op. 42 (1927)
4 Pieces (Четыре пьесы), Op. 43 (1929)
Trois récits (Три рассказа), Op. 44 (1926)
Choral
Paradise and the Peri (Рай и Пери), Cantata (1900); awarded the Rubinstein Prize
Vocal
4 Songs (Четыре романса) for high voice and piano, Op. 1 (1900)
4 Songs (Четыре романса) for voice and piano, Op. 16 (1904)
6 Songs (Шесть романсов) for low voice and piano, Op. 17 (1905)
Literary
Fugue: A Guide to the Practical Study (Фуга: руководство к практическому изучению), Moscow 1956
Memories of My Great Teachers, Friends and Comrades (Воспоминания о моих великих учителях, друзьях и товарищах), Мoscow 1957
Awards[edit]
1932 – Honored Artist of RSFSR
1949 – Peoples' Artist of Belorussian SSR
1950 – Stalin Prize

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Gauk
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« Reply #47 on: August 17, 2016, 10:31:36 pm »

That's an impressive bit of posting! Many thanks!
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christopher
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« Reply #48 on: August 18, 2016, 12:06:49 pm »

That's an impressive bit of posting! Many thanks!

Not at all.  Do let us know what you think of the music.  Personally I find some of it a bit too folk-ish.  For example the Aladau overture.  But I posted them up anyway as others might like. 

I am still on the hunt for my "Holy Grail" as far as Belarusian classical music is concerned - recordings of many of Vasil Zolotarev's symphonic works which were allegedly made in the Soviet era, and a box set of Yauhen Tsikotski's music (or Evgeny Tikotsky) which reportedly includes much of his symphonic output.  If anyone has any knowledge of these, please share!
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« Reply #49 on: August 18, 2016, 05:39:59 pm »

Thanks very much for those uploads. I enjoyed the extra glimpses of works by Aladov, especially the scherzo of the 9th symphony which joins up with the other pieces posted by him. How were you able to obtain these - Belarus libraries? No chance of the Zolotarev and Tikotsky symphonies from the same source? I don't give up hope of the Abeliovich symphonies 1 and 4 either!

Robert
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BrianA
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« Reply #50 on: August 19, 2016, 12:19:46 am »

What Robert said.  I too am desperately seeking Abeliovich 1 & 4.

Brian
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christopher
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« Reply #51 on: August 19, 2016, 11:25:03 am »

Thanks very much for those uploads. I enjoyed the extra glimpses of works by Aladov, especially the scherzo of the 9th symphony which joins up with the other pieces posted by him. How were you able to obtain these - Belarus libraries? No chance of the Zolotarev and Tikotsky symphonies from the same source? I don't give up hope of the Abeliovich symphonies 1 and 4 either!

Robert


A friend of a friend is a student in Minsk and frequently uses the National Library, so she very kindly did a bit of digging for me.  But she says they don't have any Zolotarev or Tikotsky beyond what I have posted.

Are you confident that the Abeliovich symphonies 1 and 4 have definitely been recorded?
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« Reply #52 on: August 21, 2016, 04:41:15 am »

did anyone catch that radio broadcast of Aladov's Sym no 7??    it was the Symphony Orchestra of the National Television and Radio Company of Belarus or aka  Belarus RTV SO

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« Reply #53 on: August 21, 2016, 04:46:36 pm »

What Robert said.  I too am desperately seeking Abeliovich 1 & 4.

Brian

those were both radio broadcasts......BRTVSO
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dhibbard
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« Reply #54 on: August 21, 2016, 10:51:17 pm »

I have posted up some pieces by Vasil Zalatarou (Vasilii Zolotarev in Russian) - 1872-1964.

Rondo capricciso - possibly this piece is actually by Vladislav Zolotarev who was a composer for the bayan (a kind of accordion) - and this is clearly a bayan piece!
Pushkin's letter to the Decembrists from opera "The Decembrists"
Capriccio on Hebrew Melodies

Zolotarev's original surname was Kuyumzhi (Куюмжи).

from wikipedia:

Vasily Andreyevich Zolotarev, also romanized as Zolotaryov (Russian: Василий Андреевич Золотарёв; February 24, 1872 in Taganrog – May 25, 1964 in Moscow), was a Russian (Soviet) composer, music teacher, and People's Artist of Russia.

Vasily Zolotarev was born in the city of Taganrog in 1872. Studied music at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory under direction of Mily Balakirev (1893–1898) in the class of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1898–1900), graduating in 1900. Zolotarev lectured at Moscow Conservatory (1909–1918), at the Belarus State Academy of Music (Белорусская государственная консерватория им. А. В. Луначарского) in 1933–1941, and other conservatories. Among his students in Tashkent was Mieczysław Weinberg.[2]

Vasily Zolotarev is author of three operas, seven symphonies (1902–1962), three concerti, six string quartets, songs and other works.

Rhapsodie hébraïque
The New York Times wrote of Zolotarev's Rhapsodie hébraïque that it was "based on Hebrew melodies now used in Russia… among the Jewish families of the lower classes. … [Zolotarev] found that upon a Hebrew racial idiom there had been grafted some of the characteristic of Russian music just as the irreducible language of the Jews in any country is overlaid by a few words or modes of expression belonging to the land of their environment. Thus the melodies… are the musical equivalent of Yiddish." They described the melodies as "built upon an Oriental scale… [whose] earmark is an augmented interval instead of that found in the diatonic scale between the third and fourth notes.



The article about the Hebrew Rhapsody was performed by the Russian Symphony Orchestra of NYC under the direction of Modest Altschuler.  The RSO of NYC, recorded many pieces on the Columbia record label before they disbanded in 1922.    See wiki:

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rkhenderson
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« Reply #55 on: April 01, 2017, 08:27:01 pm »

Thanks Christopher for the contributions to the Belarusian downloads. I finally get to hear some orchestral music
by Vassily Zolotarev, whose symphonies we have so long hoped to hear.  Does anyone know from which date this ballet is?
The music is effective if a little unsubtle (lots of activity and drama) and seems to have Soviet overtones rather than the Russian
romantics that I had hoped to hear.
Belarus is still a source of some of my favourite forgotten composers (Vagner, Abeliovich, Tikotsky, Aladov) so I still long for more works from their pen turning up!
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dhibbard
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« Reply #56 on: April 03, 2017, 12:40:48 am »

Belarusian Philharmonic concerts are finally appearing on BRTV.  Beethoven Sym no 2 was the other night.  https://www.kvitki.by/en/filter/46/49

hopefully, we will see the Tikotsky symphonies soon and Abeliovich's 4th
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christopher
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« Reply #57 on: April 03, 2017, 10:59:16 am »

Thanks Christopher for the contributions to the Belarusian downloads. I finally get to hear some orchestral music
by Vassily Zolotarev, whose symphonies we have so long hoped to hear.  Does anyone know from which date this ballet is?
The music is effective if a little unsubtle (lots of activity and drama) and seems to have Soviet overtones rather than the Russian
romantics that I had hoped to hear.
Belarus is still a source of some of my favourite forgotten composers (Vagner, Abeliovich, Tikotsky, Aladov) so I still long for more works from their pen turning up!

I hope to be receving more in due course, and will post accordingly.  Which works of the composers you mention do you have?  I am trying to ascertain what has even been recorded.

And in relations to that youtube link, the clip of the Zolotarev ballet, and of the Tikotsky opera, look like they are excerpts from films.  Which makes me wonder if there are complete recordings of each.
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rkhenderson
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« Reply #58 on: April 05, 2017, 08:08:30 pm »

Vagner Concertino for Piano and Chamber Ensemble (1952)   
Vagner Suite for Orchestra in A minor (1957)
Vagner Ballet "A Shell Bride" (1958)
Vagner Symphonic Poem for Orchestra and Female Chorus without Words "Live Forever" (1959)   
Vagner Suite from the Ballet "Light and Dark" (1963)   
Vagner Piano Concerto No. 1 in A minor (1965)
Vagner Ballet Suite "After the Ball" (1967)   
Vagner Symphony No. 1 in E minor (1970)
Vagner "To the Heroes of the Brest Forest", a Vocal Symphony (1975)   
Vagner Clarinet Concerto in B major (1982)   

Tikotsky "The Song of the Stormy Petrel" Heroic Poem after Maxim Gorky (1920)   
Tikotsky Symphony No. 3 in E flat, Op. 36 (1948)
Tikotsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 50 (1955)
Tikotsky Symphony No. 6 in A major, Op. 65 (1963)
Tikotsky Lyavonikha (a Belarusian dance) for Orchestra      

Abeliovich Piano Sonata No. 1 (1953)
Abeliovich Piano Trio (1955)
Abeliovich Piano Sonata No. 2 (1957)
Abeliovich Symphony No. 2 in E minor (1964)
Abeliovich Symphony No. 3 in B minor (1967)
Abeliovich "Frescoes" for Piano, Book 2 (1972)
Abeliovich Aria for Viola and Piano (1973)   
Abeliovich Aria for Violin and Orchestra (1973)      
Abeliovich Piano Sonata No. 3 (1973)
Abeliovich Vocalise in Memory of D. Shostakovich (1976)   
Abeliovich Piano Concerto (1978)
Abeliovich 5 pieces for piano (1979)
Abeliovich Ten Romances on Poems by Fyodor Tyutchev (1983)
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dhibbard
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« Reply #59 on: April 05, 2017, 08:23:32 pm »

Several of those are in the downloads section under Belarusian Music
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