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Per Nørgård: Symphony no. 8 (Helsinki PO/Storgårds)


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Author Topic: Per Nørgård: Symphony no. 8 (Helsinki PO/Storgårds)  (Read 436 times)
kyjo
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« on: February 17, 2013, 05:19:00 am »

Nørgård's latest symphony, his Eighth (2011, unrecorded thus far), can be heard on YouTube in a performance by the Helsinki PO under John Storgårds:

I:
II:
III:

Also, here is an interview of the composer and conductor discussing the piece:

 Smiley
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guest54
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2013, 12:00:42 pm »

Thanks for those pointers - most interesting, and nice to be up to date. There is a lot of structure in N's music I find - it becomes evident only after several hearings, which is rather a pleasant thing. On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?
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ahinton
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2013, 10:39:27 pm »

Thanks for those pointers - most interesting, and nice to be up to date. There is a lot of structure in N's music I find - it becomes evident only after several hearings, which is rather a pleasant thing. On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?
Does that matter, who are you to say and how in any case could any of those three German composers possibly have approved or disapproved of instruments that were not current during their respective creative lives? One might as well question what Bach might have thought about his Goldberg Variations being performed on a modern Bösendorfer piano or what view Hildegard of Bingen might have taken of the vocal writing in the Deutsche Motett or the same composer's An den Baum Daphne - or indeed of Ferneyhough's early Missa Brevis...
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JimL
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« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 04:27:36 pm »

Thanks for those pointers - most interesting, and nice to be up to date. There is a lot of structure in N's music I find - it becomes evident only after several hearings, which is rather a pleasant thing. On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?
Does that matter, who are you to say and how in any case could any of those three German composers possibly have approved or disapproved of instruments that were not current during their respective creative lives? One might as well question what Bach might have thought about his Goldberg Variations being performed on a modern Bösendorfer piano or what view Hildegard of Bingen might have taken of the vocal writing in the Deutsche Motett or the same composer's An den Baum Daphne - or indeed of Ferneyhough's early Missa Brevis...
Reminds me of a comment made by a professor at the Paris Conservatoire after the premiere of Franck's Symphony in D minor: "An English horn?  Who ever heard of a symphony by Haydn or Beethoven with an English horn?"  Apparently nobody had ever informed him about Haydn's Symphony No. 22 (there are two, replacing the oboes), not to mention earlier symphonies by Berlioz and Saint-Saens to name two composers that said professor should have heard of who utilized it.
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lescamil
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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2013, 08:41:46 am »

On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?

With all of the unusual percussion (for the time) in Beethoven's 9th symphony, yeah, I think Beethoven would have approved. I mean, bass drum, cymbals, and triangle? With timpani, too? Shocking!
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JimL
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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2013, 05:13:06 pm »

On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?

With all of the unusual percussion (for the time) in Beethoven's 9th symphony, yeah, I think Beethoven would have approved. I mean, bass drum, cymbals, and triangle? With timpani, too? Shocking!
That was actually typical 'Turkish' percussion.  I believe Haydn used the same layout in his Symphony No. 100.
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lescamil
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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2013, 08:35:53 pm »

On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?

With all of the unusual percussion (for the time) in Beethoven's 9th symphony, yeah, I think Beethoven would have approved. I mean, bass drum, cymbals, and triangle? With timpani, too? Shocking!
That was actually typical 'Turkish' percussion.  I believe Haydn used the same layout in his Symphony No. 100.

I'm aware of that. Mozart also used it in one of his Violin Concertos. I was being facetious.
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JimL
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2013, 03:44:33 pm »

On the other hand, all those vibraphones and wood-blocks - are they really necessary? Would Bach, Beethoven or Brahms have approved?

With all of the unusual percussion (for the time) in Beethoven's 9th symphony, yeah, I think Beethoven would have approved. I mean, bass drum, cymbals, and triangle? With timpani, too? Shocking!
That was actually typical 'Turkish' percussion.  I believe Haydn used the same layout in his Symphony No. 100.

I'm aware of that. Mozart also used it in one of his Violin Concertos. I was being facetious.
No, he did not.  The orchestration of the 5th Violin Concerto is strings, 2 oboes and 2 horns (with flutes replacing the oboes in the slow movement, perhaps?) all the way through, even in the "Turkish" minore section in the finale.
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lescamil
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« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2013, 08:20:06 am »

Hmm, then it was the overture to the Abduction from the Seraglio.
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JimL
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« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2013, 05:18:35 pm »

Hmm, then it was the overture to the Abduction from the Seraglio.
Quite.
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