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USA composers influenced by RVW


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Author Topic: USA composers influenced by RVW  (Read 597 times)
Toby Esterhase
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« on: February 01, 2013, 05:08:21 pm »

I made this question in another topic but they are so numerous that IMHO is better a topic about this subject.
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relm1
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« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 08:29:23 pm »

I think both John Williams and Bernard Herrmann qualify as influenced by Vaughan Williams.  They are frequently under the spell of Vaughan Williams is his modal hormonies, pastoral tendencies, color, melodic and structural contours, etc.
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Paulp
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 09:03:22 pm »

Peter Mennin was strongly influenced by RVW: his early Folk Overture (1945) could almost be an offshoot from the last movt. of the older composer's 4th Symphony, and there are moments like that in much of his work from the 1940s (though the 3rd Symphony [1946] also has strong echoes of Walton 1 to my ears). Thomas Canning also comes to mind: his Fantasia on a theme of Justin Morgan (recorded by both Howard Hanson and Stokowski) could almost be the Tallis Fantasia transplanted to the US. I suspect William Schuman was also influenced by that work, if some of the string sonorities in his 3rd Symphony (1941) are any indication. In more recent times, Claude Baker quotes quite brazenly from RVW's 4th Symphony in his orchestral "The Glass Bead Game" (1982).
Slightly off-topic, Howard Hanson went on record mentioning Holst as one of the composers he felt he had been strongly influenced by.
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Buster
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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2013, 09:56:32 pm »

The Canning work is available via my blog here:

http://big10inchrecord.blogspot.com/2009/06/american-music-for-strings.html

This record from Eastman and Howard Hanson also contains music by Peter Mennin's brother, Louis Mennini, as well as a suite by Arthur Foote.
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chill319
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« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2013, 12:41:30 am »

An interesting question. I've thought about it, off and on, for a few weeks without coming to any particular insights.

I think of two characteristic and possibly influential VW sound strategies, having two contrary characteristics: (1) pre-Baroque counterpoint used as a permeating texture that is not confined merely to certain sections of the form (as with a fugato); (2) massed strings joining together, from the lowest registers to the highest registers, in organon, often using first-inversion chords. VW combined both of these strategies with a very personal mix of Renaissance-modal and third-related minor harmonies.

PaulP's discussion of Schuman's Symphony 3 is quite intriguing, and I can see the broad kinship between Schuman's contrapuntal textures in Symphony 3 and textures champoined by VW. I might even go further and suggest both a compositional and aesthetic kinship between the two composers' symphonies 8 and 9.

On the other hand, given the remarkable scoring of Schuman's Symphony 2 and his clear debt to Harris in the earlier published symphonies, I wonder whether the VW angle is indirect. Does anyone hear any trace of VW in Harris's first three symphonies? Did Schuman write about VW somewhere?
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2014, 01:09:37 am »

In the strings use of this symphony i'd trace RVW
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Vandermolen
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2014, 09:52:06 pm »

Piston's 'New England Sketches' at one point (opening of one movement 'Mountains') seems to quote from the opening of Vaughan Williams's contemporaneous Ninth Symphony.

Hovhaness's 'Mysterious Mountain' is clearly indepted to the Tallis Fantasia.
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2016, 04:31:37 pm »

Recently i listened Douglas Moore's Second.IMHO has a hint by RVW
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2017, 12:59:50 am »

John Donald Robb symphonies:
http://www.robbtrust.org/jd-robb-the-man--his-music.html
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Gauk
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« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2017, 07:29:44 am »

Thomas Canning also comes to mind: his Fantasia on a theme of Justin Morgan (recorded by both Howard Hanson and Stokowski) could almost be the Tallis Fantasia transplanted to the US.

This work goes beyond "influenced by" to "derivative of"!
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relm1
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« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2017, 12:23:58 am »

I seem to recall Arnold Rosner was influenced by RVW.  Perhaps the work I heard it is was Rosner's Symphony No. 5. 
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