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Your Discovery of the Year


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Author Topic: Your Discovery of the Year  (Read 10925 times)
Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #195 on: February 19, 2018, 11:48:12 pm »

Svetlanov recording are considered Landmark for this composer.Sadly sound quality is sometimes poor and the sound lack of depth (this is a limit also of recent Melodiya Anthology),IMHO this is a more recent reconding and benefit of modern restore,also orchestra seems react to this conductor with some passion.Sadly webpage of this label is offline,so i can't say if it was an integral alternative version of Myaskovsky symphonies.
Best
P.S.
I listened also Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky :IMHO are less convicing

Huh? Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky conduct the 26th? Where? When? What label? If broadcast, please upload.

The 26th conducted by Nikolayev is easy to find. All these others, I never heard of. Only Svetlanov and Nikolayev 26th.





Dear Amphissa.Clearly i was speaking of all Myaskovsky's cycle.IMHO one of the reason of his scarce diffusion outside Russia is scarce sound quality of recordings.
Truly before this i didn't know Nikolaev as conductor
Best
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Amphissa
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« Reply #196 on: February 20, 2018, 02:20:52 am »

Ah! Okay!
I have been collecting Myaskovsky recordings for many years. The only complete cycle of the symphonies is by Svetlanov. It is good to have his set, because it includes the *only* recordings of Symphonies 3, 4, 13, 14, 18 and 20. However, in many cases, if there are other recordings, Svetlanov leaves much to be desired. For example, his recordings of 5 and 6 are very bad. We are lucky to have other recordings, especially of these two great works.

In addition to the conductors you mention, many other conductors have recorded one or more Myaskovsky symphonies --
Rozhdestvensky
Rabl
Downes
Manolov
Kondrashin
Liss
Ginzberg
Halasz
Stankovsky
Gauk
Mikailov
Sergeyev
Gould
Ormandy
Kovalev

Nikoleyev also conducted a recording of Symphony 21, but others are better.

As for Myaskovsky's other orchestral works, there are many recordings of the violin concerto and cello concerto, of course, but also his many other orchestral works. Svetlanov made the only recording of some of these, but others have been recorded by multiple conductors.


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« Reply #197 on: April 04, 2018, 07:48:01 am »

I like Kondrashin's performances of Miaskovsky's music. His Symphony 6 (Russian Disc recording) is in a class of its own despite the aged acoustics.
Discovery of the year:
Fricker 'The Vision of Judgment' (thanks to cilgwyn of this forum for alerting me to its qualities).

An earlier discovery which means a lot to me is Maximilian Steinberg's Symphony 4 (Dutton CD).
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kyjo
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« Reply #198 on: December 28, 2018, 04:48:07 pm »

Hi all, I'm finally on break now so I'll have some time to post here! Anyway, I’ve made many great musical discoveries this year, but I think the finest of all them has been the Symphonie (1952) by Jean-Michel Damase (1928-2013). Its language is resolutely tonal, sharing some stylistic similarities with, say, Honegger, but possessing a compellingly individual voice. It’s a deeply uplifting and memorable work that begins ominously, but eventually the opening mysterious, chromatic theme is transformed into a radiant C major with the horn entrance around 8 minutes in. The final few minutes of the first movement have become one of my very favorite passages in music - a gloriously ecstatic musical "sunset" that lingers in the memory. The slow movement is haunting and soulful, and the finale is rhythmically energetic and ends with a triumphant reminiscence of the first movement. In short, this is a superbly life-affirming and memorable work that will make you want to shout from the rooftops! Despite the work’s greatness, it has only received one recording (on Dutton Epoch with the BBC Concert Orchestra under Martin Yates - fortunately a very fine performance) and is unknown to most listeners. It is pretty unfathomable to me that orchestras will continue to churn out their 1000th performances of Beethoven’s 5th and Tchaikovsky’s 4th yet completely neglect such a great work as this.

https://www.amazon.com/Damase-Piano-Concerto-Concertino-Symphonie/dp/B00M2D7MY0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1546145042&sr=1-1&keywords=damase+symphonie
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« Reply #199 on: December 29, 2018, 06:29:06 pm »

Welcome back, Kyle Smiley

I cannot quite share your enormous enthusiasm for the Damase Symphony. It is certainly a most attractive and appealing work-a match of Faure and Poulenc-but I am afraid that it doesn't quite grip me in the way it obviously does you.

However, given your evident enthusiasm, I did go back to the Dutton cd and listen to the work again. And that is what such a recommendation should do!!
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« Reply #200 on: December 29, 2018, 08:51:28 pm »

I have only just realised that you have posted a link to the actual Dutton recording of the Damase symphony, Kyle.

Please remove it!! We went through the mill with this issue a few months back (as you may not realise!). The Dutton recording can be purchased.....and should be purchased. We cannot prevent those interested in sampling it from going to You Tube but we do not post such entire recordings on here.
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« Reply #201 on: December 30, 2018, 04:43:36 am »

I have only just realised that you have posted a link to the actual Dutton recording of the Damase symphony, Kyle.

Please remove it!! We went through the mill with this issue a few months back (as you may not realise!). The Dutton recording can be purchased.....and should be purchased. We cannot prevent those interested in sampling it from going to You Tube but we do not post such entire recordings on here.

My apologies Colin! I did not realize that was a policy here. I will remove it right away and replace it with an Amazon link instead. Smiley
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kyjo
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« Reply #202 on: December 30, 2018, 04:54:50 am »

Welcome back, Kyle Smiley

I cannot quite share your enormous enthusiasm for the Damase Symphony. It is certainly a most attractive and appealing work-a match of Faure and Poulenc-but I am afraid that it doesn't quite grip me in the way it obviously does you.

However, given your evident enthusiasm, I did go back to the Dutton cd and listen to the work again. And that is what such a recommendation should do!!

I find that beneath its Gallic elegance, the Damase Symphonie is a work of some depth and eloquence, not least in the struggle between light and dark in the first movement (when the light finally breaks through around 8 minutes in with the horn entrance it is such a glorious moment!!) and in the poignant lyricism of the second. I am occasionally reminded of Poulenc in the work, but more often of Honegger (in less abrasive mode) and some English composers (RVW, Bax, Rubbra), but, like I mentioned before, Damase has his own voice. BTW, it was Jeffrey (vandermolen) who initially recommended the work to me, so major hat tip to him! Smiley
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the Administration
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« Reply #203 on: December 30, 2018, 04:58:11 am »

I have only just realised that you have posted a link to the actual Dutton recording of the Damase symphony, Kyle.

Please remove it!! We went through the mill with this issue a few months back (as you may not realise!). The Dutton recording can be purchased.....and should be purchased. We cannot prevent those interested in sampling it from going to You Tube but we do not post such entire recordings on here.

My apologies Colin! I did not realize that was a policy here. I will remove it right away and replace it with an Amazon link instead. Smiley

Your co-operation is warmly appreciated! If you take a look at the You Tube performances section of the forum you will find the threads and posts which relate to this issue and the lengthy discussion we had here at the time. I very much doubt that anyone will wish to re-open that discussion (I certainly don't!) but what finally emerged was a "firm line" (yes, I think we could call it a "policy") to which we have adhered since then.

Don't apologise, Kyle. There is no need. In some ways you can count yourself fortunate to have been "on holiday" (from the forum, I mean obviously Smiley) and did not have to live through the difficult times we had Roll Eyes
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« Reply #204 on: December 30, 2018, 08:16:25 pm »

I find that beneath its Gallic elegance, the Damase Symphonie is a work of some depth and eloquence, not least in the struggle between light and dark in the first movement (when the light finally breaks through around 8 minutes in with the horn entrance it is such a glorious moment!!) and in the poignant lyricism of the second. I am occasionally reminded of Poulenc in the work, but more often of Honegger (in less abrasive mode) and some English composers (RVW, Bax, Rubbra), but, like I mentioned before, Damase has his own voice. BTW, it was Jeffrey (vandermolen) who initially recommended the work to me, so major hat tip to him! Smiley

Welcome back Kyle (I had an unfinished Atterberg thread when you left). I concur with you re this piece, thanks for the recommendation. As a long time devotee of Honegger symphonies from the 70s supraphon vinyl days, I warmed to it right away. There is something of the care-fee quality of S4, 'Deliciae Basilienses', the chorale that is the summation of S2, and the sunlight breaking through the clouds towards the end of 'Cantate de Noel' (composed 52/53!) that is akin to the spirit of the end of the first movement of this Damase Symphonie. As well as other French composers, interestingly, I hear a touch of Honegger's pupil Ned Rorem.
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kyjo
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« Reply #205 on: December 31, 2018, 01:37:48 am »

Welcome back Kyle (I had an unfinished Atterberg thread when you left). I concur with you re this piece, thanks for the recommendation. As a long time devotee of Honegger symphonies from the 70s supraphon vinyl days, I warmed to it right away. There is something of the care-fee quality of S4, 'Deliciae Basilienses', the chorale that is the summation of S2, and the sunlight breaking through the clouds towards the end of 'Cantate de Noel' (composed 52/53!) that is akin to the spirit of the end of the first movement of this Damase Symphonie. As well as other French composers, interestingly, I hear a touch of Honegger's pupil Ned Rorem.

Great to hear from you, Jim! Smiley I was just listening to Honegger's 'Cantate de Noel' around Christmastime and was also struck by the similarities in spirit with the contemporaneous Damase Symphonie - both compositions begin ominously but conclude on a note of uplifting radiance. Honegger had a real knack for effective "darkness-to-light" progressions in his compositions - not only in the "Cantate de Noel' and 2nd Symphony, but in the terribly moving coda of the 3rd Symphony, which serves as a benediction after all the darkness and anger that has come before it. Interesting that you mention Rorem - I see the stylistic connection now that you mention it! I really like his three symphonies, especially no. 1 which has a Gallic elegance suffused with a quintessentially American spirit.
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« Reply #206 on: December 31, 2018, 01:19:57 pm »

Honegger was one of the finest 20th century composers but-it seems to me-is still under-rated and, particularly recently, appears to have rather dropped off the radar. My impression is that his music is not performed often in the concert hall and that there have been fewer recordings of his music. It does not of course help that France does not have an equivalent of Dutton, Lyrita and Chandos in the UK, or CPO in Germany, or Dux in Poland or BIS in Sweden and does less than many other countries to disseminate its own music. Yes, I am aware of the Timpani record label but its output is rather limited (not a single disc of any music by Landowski, for example).

Kyle and Jim have referred to some of Honegger's symphonic and choral music. The symphonies are all in their different ways exceptionally fine works and the Christmas Cantata is a gorgeous piece of music. But there are so many shorter orchestral pieces I have heard which are also extremely impressive.

Honegger repays anyone who explores his music!
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« Reply #207 on: December 31, 2018, 01:57:07 pm »

Can anyone recommend a modern recording of "Le Roi David", please? I got to know this marvellous work on the LP set conducted by Ansermet (late 1950s, I think?), but I sold all my LPs ages ago. That recording is, of course, available on CD now, but I wondered if there was a more modern performance someone could recommend.
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« Reply #208 on: December 31, 2018, 02:20:29 pm »

Can anyone recommend a modern recording of "Le Roi David", please? I got to know this marvellous work on the LP set conducted by Ansermet (late 1950s, I think?), but I sold all my LPs ages ago. That recording is, of course, available on CD now, but I wondered if there was a more modern performance someone could recommend.

I have the Dutoit version on Erato-which is very good-but for comparative reviews of other performances (which I have not heard):

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/dec99/david.htm

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/May/Honegger_David_MIR318.htm
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kyjo
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« Reply #209 on: December 31, 2018, 04:57:57 pm »

Honegger was one of the finest 20th century composers but-it seems to me-is still under-rated and, particularly recently, appears to have rather dropped off the radar. My impression is that his music is not performed often in the concert hall and that there have been fewer recordings of his music. It does not of course help that France does not have an equivalent of Dutton, Lyrita and Chandos in the UK, or CPO in Germany, or Dux in Poland or BIS in Sweden and does less than many other countries to disseminate its own music. Yes, I am aware of the Timpani record label but its output is rather limited (not a single disc of any music by Landowski, for example).

Kyle and Jim have referred to some of Honegger's symphonic and choral music. The symphonies are all in their different ways exceptionally fine works and the Christmas Cantata is a gorgeous piece of music. But there are so many shorter orchestral pieces I have heard which are also extremely impressive.

Honegger repays anyone who explores his music!

You are quite right about Honegger, Colin - his status in the music world is not as high as it should be - but then again the same could be said about many composers. If one of his works is performed in the US, it’s most likely to be ‘Pacific 231’, which IMHO isn’t one of his strongest works. I’d be very lucky to come across a performance of one of his other works. Concerning other fine Honegger works, I love his gorgeously lyrical and witty Cello Concerto, as well as the all-too-brief ‘Pastorale d’été’, which conveys the heat of a summer’s day better than any work I know.
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