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Your Discovery of the Year


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Author Topic: Your Discovery of the Year  (Read 10011 times)
Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2013, 11:22:18 pm »

Thanks to UC i approached to contemporary netherlands composer.IMHO one of the most impressive works on WWII is Orthel's Third :

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kyjo
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« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2013, 11:36:37 pm »

Agreed, Toby! Orthel's powerful music certainly merits more attention than it has been getting. Fortunately, between the Etcetera disc and the downloads available here, we have access to all of Orthel's six symphonies and some other works of his Smiley
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albert
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« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2013, 09:44:08 am »

My discovery of the year is Henry Rabaud Symphony n.2 (Timpani).
A fine "grand" (I do not know if I may to say great) late French Romantic Symphony, by a youngster, previously known to me only through relatively short pieces.
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David Carter
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« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2013, 01:47:42 pm »

Albion's British Music Archive
Indeed, David-what a treasure trove of unsung goodies! We are very fortunate to have so much of Fricker's music in the Archive when he has been so criminally neglected on disc! Fricker's music may seem a bit "difficult" at first, but subsequent listenings truly reveal a composer of great substance. Fricker isn't the only composer who has been so well representing in the Archive-plenty of Daniel Jones, William Wordsworth, Iain Hamilton, Havergal Brian etc. can be found there also Smiley

Glad you could count composers as different as Bach and Fricker as your two greatest discoveries, David Smiley

I'm intrigued Kyjo by how you would define "a bit difficult" but think I understand. I guess Parry/Sullivan would be "easy", Fricker "a bit difficult", Birtwistle "Very Difficult" and Ferneyhough on a different planet altogether. The music I enjoy most would put Birtwistle/Ferneyhough at the easiest point and Parry/Sullivan at the most difficult and Schuman on an entirely different planet (along with Eianuldi (or however you spell his name)).

**Generalisation alert.**
As to the Bach/Fricker thing it's been an observation of mine over many years  now that people at the cutting edge of contemporary music usually pay a great deal of homage to Bach and Beethoven but not so much to the other "Great" composers. There is something about LVB and JSB which has always inspired every new generation of contemporary composers no matter how far removed their own music sounds.

**2nd major generalisation alert**
In Broad terms music is only worth listenting to if it's Beethoven backwards or Charles Ives forward all the stuff in between is just dull.
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kyjo
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« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2013, 08:08:19 pm »

I'm intrigued Kyjo by how you would define "a bit difficult" but think I understand.
Fricker's music was "a bit difficult" to me at first mainly because it has very little "surface glimmer" and does not give up its secrets as easily as, say, George Lloyd (another fine British composer roughly contemporary with Fricker). However, with repeated listenings, I began to appreciate and enjoy his music more Smiley
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2013, 08:52:46 pm »

I'm intrigued Kyjo by how you would define "a bit difficult" but think I understand.
Fricker's music was "a bit difficult" to me at first mainly because it has very little "surface glimmer" and does not give up its secrets as easily as, say, George Lloyd (another fine British composer roughly contemporary with Fricker). However, with repeated listenings, I began to appreciate and enjoy his music more Smiley
I must admit I've never heard anyone compare George Lloyd with Fricker before! But there's always a first time! Smiley
A bit of a tough nut to crack that George Lloyd!!! Grin
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kyjo
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« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2013, 09:13:03 pm »

Oh, I was just trying to think of a British composer roughly contemporary with Fricker whose music has immediate appeal (as opposed to Fricker's music needing multiple listens to fully appreciate), so I chose Lloyd. Two quite different but equally wonderful composers!

Glad to hear the Rabaud Symphony no. 2 was your discovery, Alberto Smiley It's a big, very well-written late-romantic piece that would appeal to anyone (myself included) who enjoys the music of D'Indy, Magnard, Chausson, Ropartz, Lazzari, Franck and other French symphonists from that period. I'm rather surprised my post announcing the release of that Timpani disc didn't attract more attention here!
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2013, 09:48:02 pm »

If you are looking for composers contemporary with Fricker-ie composers born within three years of his birth date of 1920-then I could mention:

1917: Richard Arnell; John Gardner
1920: Geoffrey Bush
1921; Sir Malcolm Arnold; Ruth Gipps; Robert Simpson
1922: Iain Hamilton; John Veale
1923: Arthur Butterworth


Now, of these nine some are obvious romantics(eg Arnell) or in the mainstream of the British symphonic tradition, influenced by Vaughan Williams or Sibelius(eg Gardner, Bush, Arnold, Gipps, Veale, Butterworth). The three who stand out as more obviously modern are Simpson and Hamilton; but, again, Simpson is influenced by Beethoven, Bruckner and Nielsen).

Fricker and Hamilton are the two composers who push tonality, who were influenced by more of the contemporary European mainstream(Bartok, Stravinsky etc) and both have disappeared without trace from our record labels and our concert halls.

I am by no means an advocate for "modernist music" Grin I love the music of the British traditionalists.......but the absolute and total neglect of Fricker and Hamilton (not to mention my "heroes" of the earlier generation: Arnold Cooke, William Wordsworth and Daniel Jones) is a scandal Angry
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2013, 12:39:40 am »

Scandalous certainly describes the neglect of Daniel Jones,here in his native Wales,by the so called BBC National Orchestra of Wales! Angry
Anyway,I've been over this before here & elsewhere,haven't I! Grin Sad

The Rabaud Symphony sounds interesting. I do wish Timpani would consider the Tournemire symphonies! Oh,well.... Roll Eyes Sad
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kyjo
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« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2013, 01:43:48 am »

The Rabaud Symphony sounds interesting. I do wish Timpani would consider the Tournemire symphonies! Oh,well.... Roll Eyes Sad
Please do investigate the Rabaud, cilgwyn. If you like big late-romantic symphonies, you couldn't go wrong with it! I also wish Timpani would record the Tournemire symphonies-the Marco Polo recordings don't serve these wonderful works nearly well enough Sad
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2013, 01:25:07 pm »

It sounds right up my street,as they say! It's on my 'list' now! Ropartz is another one. As to Tournemire,maybe I should start a thread? Can't understand the neglect! I only wish I owned a cd label,although it would probably be Daniel Jones symphonies first! Grin

NB: Have Chandos abandoned their forum? Anyone else noticed this?!
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #26 on: January 08, 2013, 01:58:18 am »

Agreed, Toby! Orthel's powerful music certainly merits more attention than it has been getting. Fortunately, between the Etcetera disc and the downloads available here, we have access to all of Orthel's six symphonies and some other works of his Smiley

On the same subject but less somber H.Andriessen's Third IMHO a wonderful work.
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kyjo
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« Reply #27 on: January 08, 2013, 02:19:08 am »

Indeed, Toby! As has been mentioned elsewhere, CPO is embarking on a Andriessen symphonic cycle (with other orchestral works thrown in). Although the Etcetera performances are fine, I have no doubt Cpo will be able to improve upon them. BTW did anyone here purchase the first volume in the CPO series (containing Symphony no. 1, Ballet Suite, Symphonic Etudes and Kuhnau Variations), and if so, how did it compare to the performances on Etcetera?

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Dundonnell
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« Reply #28 on: January 08, 2013, 03:11:11 am »

With so many cds to buy I really cannot afford duplications........BUT I might be tempted by the cpo disc for the simple and single reason that the performance of the Andriessen Symphony No.1 on the Etcetera disc is a rather ancient recording from 1947.
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Christo
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« Reply #29 on: January 08, 2013, 07:05:13 pm »

Indeed, Toby! As has been mentioned elsewhere, CPO is embarking on a Andriessen symphonic cycle (with other orchestral works thrown in). Although the Etcetera performances are fine, I have no doubt Cpo will be able to improve upon them. BTW did anyone here purchase the first volume in the CPO series (containing Symphony no. 1, Ballet Suite, Symphonic Etudes and Kuhnau Variations), and if so, how did it compare to the performances on Etcetera?


Not yet, but hope to find the funds for it in a few weeks time. I am planning to buy it for the same reason Colin (Dundonnell) mentins: the historical 1947 performance of the First Symphony - from 1930, an early work - on Etcetera leaves much to be desired. Another good reason might be the Ballet Suite ('Ballet-suite') for orchestra from his vintage years (1947). I don't think I ever heard the piece before.
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948

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