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Time, Forward!


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Author Topic: Time, Forward!  (Read 2179 times)
Neil McGowan
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« Reply #30 on: November 23, 2011, 07:02:39 am »

This has a bit of a motor going in it (at times):



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t-p
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« Reply #31 on: November 23, 2011, 07:40:11 pm »

Thanks. This is very interesting Rachmaninoff!!!!

Another tendency in the last century was music with no rhythm. Was Percy Grainger modernist too?

He wrote amazing piece in 1907 and revised it. It is called free music for string quartet. It is available now on radio 3 COTW listen agian.
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Swanekj
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« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2012, 05:15:16 pm »

Back to the Sviridov: apart from the obvious Sabre Dance, I'm wondering if there are other notable brief Russian examples in the severely motoric and delightfully vulgar vein?

The sad thing about Socialist Realism in the USSR's music is that it rarely delivered on its promise, and while it certainly achieved vulgarity in the utmost, the "motor" is usually trudging along beyond. But there is reams of this kind of material...


.

Who might be deemed the closest to following an ideal of Socialist Realism?

I would nominate Valeriy Gavrilin, based on what is available at:

http://classical-music-online.net/en/composer/Gavrilin/960

.
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« Reply #33 on: October 06, 2012, 09:10:46 am »

A motor was going all the time in the old Soviet Union. This is just one example; Kara Karaev, violin/piano sonata:



I think Karaev is another forgotten name.

Gavrilin  was well known.  He was younger than Karaev. They both were both known in the Soviet era. It is easy to confuse Gavrilin with Gavrilov (the pianist Gavrilov). Thank you for bringing Gavrilin back to my memory.

While listening to Karaev I noticed that his name is spelled differently in this clip. He is Qara Qarayev:



Is it possible that he is also spelled Gara Garayev? It is very confusing.
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Elroel
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« Reply #34 on: October 06, 2012, 11:18:44 pm »

Yes it is not only possible, but a fact: the name was first known to us as Karayev. Later thay used also Garaev
Nowadays, since Azerbaidjan in an independant country, they start transliteration from there own language and decided the sound of the letter should be transliterated as Q. The letter sounds as a softened K.
In most other languages this sound doesn't exist, so they tried to stay as close to the sound as they thought was correct for English speaking people. The sound actually has an Arabic origin. The language of Azerbaidjan is related to Turkish. More on this matter you can find here: http://www.mongabay.com/history/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-language_language,_religion,_and_culture.html.

I feel we now should use the Qara Qaraev.

Elroel


Elroel
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« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2012, 09:45:01 am »

Thank you very much for interesting information.

Kara Karaev was successful and prolific composer like (Khachaturyan).  He wrote music for movies too. I found out they still play some of it:



I just remember the name Andrei Petrov, composer. This did not sound to me like Petrov I remember:



I am beginning to think it is a different Petrov.  I remember the motor-like music of Petrov.

Then I found this clip (Fantasy on a theme of Mussorgsky):



I googled and I think this music is by the composer I remember.

There is a pianist named Petrov, but his first name is different.
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Patrick Murtha
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« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2012, 03:21:29 am »

Going back to the original post, Valentin Katayev's 1932 novel Time, Forward!, which is the basis of the 1965 film for which Sviridov wrote the score, is an absolutely smashing book. You wouldn't think a Five-Year Plan novel about an industrial contest could be sprightly and funny, but it truly is. It was first translated into English soon after it was published, and is currently available in a paperback edition from Northwestern University Press. Fyodor Gladkov's Cement, available in the same series, is another interesting Soviet industrial novel (albeit with one of the least enticing titles ever).  
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« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2012, 05:02:58 am »

. . . albeit with one of the least enticing titles ever . . .

Yes - even worse than "Yeast, a Problem" and "Dross"!
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2012, 11:20:27 am »

You wouldn't think a Five-Year Plan novel about an industrial contest could be sprightly and funny, but it truly is.

The ironies of life under the 'new realities' of socialism provided much material for creative spirits Smiley  Shostakovich's ballet (which is very much in the same spirit as Broadway shows of the same era) 'Svetlie Ruchei' ('The Bright Stream') is very much the same. The title isn't touching, but instead intentionally ironic - 'Bright Stream' is the name of a collective farm where the action takes place. The story is about the high jinx which arise when the ballet artistes from a 'big theatre' in Moscow are sent as extra workers to help with the harvest on a farm in the south. Of course, it just happens that the wife of the farm's Chief Agronomist turns out to be the promising young star of the Bolshoi Academy... who threw-over a ballet career to marry the Agronomist who'd captured her heart...


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« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2012, 07:46:17 am »

Kataev was much loved and read. I still think he is a good writer. Kaverin was also loved.

One can compare it with Ostrovsky's How the Steel Was Tempered. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_the_Steel_Was_Tempered
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« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2012, 12:56:40 pm »

We often thought that Soviet books were worthless and nothing could come out of social-realism as we called it.
But I remember book Grossman's book Life and Fate. There was a movie made based on this novel.

It is amazing book about how people could keep their dignity and stay decent  even in extreme situations (like during the war).
In our daily life we don't encounter such life and death situations on the daily basis .
But in our lives we do encounter struggles and we have to make decisions. (Life's situations and dilemmas could be thought in different context).

So some of what the author is talking about could be encounter in our everyday lives.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_and_Fate

Life moved  ahead since WW2.
Violin 21 Composer V.Gavrilin pieces 2 strings Pirastro Passione


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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2015, 11:49:57 pm »

There was previous mention of Miaskovsky, who I consider to be the greatest Russian Symphonist.
Very prolific, but not interested in notoriety outside mother Russia. Like most Communist composers, he had to follow the party line,
but his music is patriotic but much too lyrical to be included in the sterile socialist realism touted by leftists of the day.
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autoharp
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« Reply #42 on: February 11, 2015, 08:20:27 pm »

the sterile socialist realism touted by leftists of the day.

Somewhat sweeping, but no doubt you've done thorough research. Or maybe you've missed out on the good bits?  Wink

But there is reams of this kind of material...


Mind you, if there's "reams of this kind of material", I wouldn't mind being pointed to more - if it's anywhere near as good as that Muradeli example. But perhaps it's his best piece?
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #43 on: February 12, 2015, 01:42:12 pm »

Mind you, if there's "reams of this kind of material", I wouldn't mind being pointed to more - if it's anywhere near as good as that Muradeli example. But perhaps it's his best piece?

The motor is running in 4th gear throughout most of Prokofiev's THE FIERY ANGEL Smiley)   Performances in Dusseldorf throughout May and June, and a throughout the autumn Smiley

And a very weedy performance currently at the Bolshoi, where Mikhail Jurowsky somehow never gets out of 2nd gear... very pedestrian indeed.  Henryk Nanasi in Berlin really has the measure of the piece Smiley)

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autoharp
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« Reply #44 on: March 02, 2015, 06:06:21 pm »

Mind you, if there's "reams of this kind of material", I wouldn't mind being pointed to more - if it's anywhere near as good as that Muradeli example. But perhaps it's his best piece?

The motor is running in 4th gear throughout most of Prokofiev's THE FIERY ANGEL Smiley)   Performances in Dusseldorf throughout May and June, and a throughout the autumn Smiley

Speaking of Prokofiev, I've recently discovered that the 1960s recording of Cantata for the 20th anniversary of the October Revolution op 74, conducted by Kondrashin, is on Youtube. It's incomplete of course (no musical settings of Stalin) but is a notably more vigorous and admirable performance than the complete version conducted by Rozhdestvensky in the 1990s.

Here's the opening -

I don't know much about Kondrashin, but I'd previously noted that his recording of Prefatory Action (Scriabin/Nemtin) is much more striking than that of Ashkenazy. Are there other Kondrashin recordings which could be considered top-of-the-pile? His opening of Mahler 6 must be one of the fastest . . .
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