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Glyndebourne Opera productions to be streamed in 2013 with 'The Guardian'


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Author Topic: Glyndebourne Opera productions to be streamed in 2013 with 'The Guardian'  (Read 294 times)
Neil McGowan
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« on: October 05, 2012, 08:44:03 pm »

The Guardian has released news of which Glyndebourne 2013 productions will be streamed next year.

A new ARIADNE AUF NAXOS - conducted by outgoing MD Vladimir Jurowski - seems to lead the pack Smiley
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Gerard
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« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 10:50:55 am »

Thank you. But would it be correct to say that Glyndebourne is seventy-five per cent about dressing up and only twenty-five per cent about opera?
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Appreciative, or investigatory, that is the question . . .
jimfin
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« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2012, 10:52:22 am »

I think many of the audience are preoccupied with dressing up, but the opera is taken very seriously and is of a high standard, so if you can ignore the dresses, you'll be fine.
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2012, 12:17:17 pm »

I largely agree with JimFin here, although I wouldn't like to take a guess on the percentage split Smiley

I think it's very possible - according to what I've been told by former Glyndebourne staff - that there was an era - in the 1970s and 80s - when Glyndebourne did go thrrough a rather navel-gazing stage. It was probably when the financing base reinvented itself from the 'old money' which launched it and kept it afloat in the early days, and moved on to attracting corporate sponsorship... and the kind of wining & dining that goes along with that.

However, with the new era of the new theatre, and Gus Christie running the show, they've moved on. What counts at Glyndebourne is uncompromised quality of performance and interpretation.  They pay the highest fees, and have the most thorough rehearsal periods, in order to secure this. For example, at my old stomping-ground of the Coliseum we staged a new production in six weeks, or wheeled out a revival in four. By comparison my partner sang Kostelnicka in JENUFA at Glyndebourne in 2010, and they flew her over for two weeks of initial music rehearsals early in the year, before a three-month production period. It's a different way of doing operas entirely, and I can think of only 2-3 other places who work along these perfectionist lines. Of course, they can still 'get it wrong' even so - I hated Melly Still's VIXEN this year, which seemed fundamentally flawed in its conception. (Perhaps I was also more inclined to the Opera de Bastille production I saw in 2008, which was a 'defining' production in almost every respect, and seemed to tick all the boxes effortlessly.]

Of course there is the opportunity to have a lovely day out with a picnic on the lawns too. But this doesn't impinge on the quality of what's done there, nor on what the core activity is - which is the music and the performance quality Smiley)

People may moan about Glyndebourne being exclusive, and perhaps it is - but it hurts nobody, doesn't get a penny of subsidy, and turns in stupendous results. I'm probably indisposed to this kind of thing by personal temperament - but every time I've been (admittedly, on Guest tickets each time) I've had a wonderful afternoon, and never felt 'excluded' at all Smiley 

The willingness of Glyndebourne to make their work accessible - for free, by contrast with Bayreuth, let's say - on live streaming internet relays is a true indicator of their striving for excellence and propagation of opera. Of course, you can have champagne and a picnic on your lounge carpet as you watch, and even wear Evening Dress if you feel it's necessary Smiley
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Sydney Grew
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2013, 08:13:30 am »

It may be of interest to learn that the Glyndebourne performance of Tristan, which has been available via the Guardian for the past few days, but which I forgot to watch, is happily now available at YouTube, There is just one separate file for each act, and one of the several formats in which they are available is new to me: the "webm" format (read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webm ). It appears to provide excellent quality. I use the Flash Video Downloader version 3.8.2, written by Pavel Shcherbakov - which is a surname that should be familiar to people here.

First Act:

Second Act:

Third Act:

I have not sat down to watch the whole thing yet, but a few bits I saw seemed rather run-of-the-mill - wobbly sopranos, perfunctory orchestral playing, and all that. Perhaps some one has seen it and is better qualified to judge.

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