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 1 
 on: Today at 10:07:20 am 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by ahinton
How about Music Today and Tomorrow?

 2 
 on: Today at 10:06:04 am 
Started by britishcomposer - Last post by ahinton
To be broadcast this evening, 8 pm, by Deutschlandfunk Kultur, the programme includes a piece by our esteemed member Alastair:


Raritäten der Klaviermusik
Schloss vor Husum, Rittersaal
Aufzeichnung vom 21.08.2017

George Enescu
Choral et Carillon nocturne aus Suite Nr. 3, op. 18

Marc-André Hamelin
Pavane variée

Alistair Hinton
Vocalise-Reminiscenza op. 29

Samuel Feinberg
Sonate Nr.2 a-Moll, op. 2
Sonate Nr.1 A-Dur, op. 1
Sonate Nr.4 es-Moll, op. 6

Léon Jongen
Campeador

Moritz Moszkowski
Valse op. 34 Nr. 1
Caprice espagnol op. 37

Marc-André Hamelin, Klavier

http://www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de/programmvorschau.282.de.html
Thank you for drawing attention to this. Sadly, I was unable to attend personally but I'm looking forward to listening in this evening.

 3 
 on: Today at 08:41:55 am 
Started by britishcomposer - Last post by britishcomposer
To be broadcast this evening, 8 pm, by Deutschlandfunk Kultur, the programme includes a piece by our esteemed member Alastair:


Raritäten der Klaviermusik
Schloss vor Husum, Rittersaal
Aufzeichnung vom 21.08.2017

George Enescu
Choral et Carillon nocturne aus Suite Nr. 3, op. 18

Marc-André Hamelin
Pavane variée

Alistair Hinton
Vocalise-Reminiscenza op. 29

Samuel Feinberg
Sonate Nr.2 a-Moll, op. 2
Sonate Nr.1 A-Dur, op. 1
Sonate Nr.4 es-Moll, op. 6

Léon Jongen
Campeador

Moritz Moszkowski
Valse op. 34 Nr. 1
Caprice espagnol op. 37

Marc-André Hamelin, Klavier

http://www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de/programmvorschau.282.de.html

 4 
 on: August 23, 2017, 11:26:25 pm 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by Jeff
In view of another hot topic here,what about.......Annoyingly Good New Music?

 5 
 on: August 23, 2017, 06:54:01 pm 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by Gauk
But "Seven States of Rain" (and there are many worse) tells the listener nothing except that the composer is rather pretentious.

I'm largely with you up to that point...  but then the iceberg starts to melt for me.

What is that makes "Seven States Of Rain" pretentious (if, let us say, the composer seriously intended to portray different kinds of precipitation as music), but "Four Sea Interludes" is perfectly fine? Or indeed, Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the countryside ?


There are many worse examples, but I was short of time and looking fro something specifically for violin and piano. The work is not seven states of rain. Four Sea Interludes ARE interludes. If it had been entitled "Rain: Seven sketches for violin and piano" there would be no criticism of it at all. And when did you ever hear anyone talk about a "state of rain", anyway?

Let's go back to Alastair's point that modern works often don't follow classical forms, and you can't call a piece a violin sonata if it's not a sonata. Whet irks me is that when a piece evidently DOES fit a classical title, it's not used. Let's take a recent example: Julian Anderson's recent Proms commission. This is a piano concerto, and was introduced as a piano concerto, but is it called "Piano Concerto No 1"? No, it's called "The Imaginary Museum". Not even "Piano Concerto 'The Imaginary Museum'". Note that definitive article, as though there is one imaginary museum somewhere in the world and we ought to know about it. If it had been called "An Imaginary Museum", even, that would have struck a less pretentious note.

In contrast, take James Dillon. A work like Helle Nacht doesn't call out for any formal title, and the title it has is fine. But when Dillon writes a string quartet, he calls it "String Quartet No 8" (or whatever), and not "Remembered Crystal Geometries".

 6 
 on: August 23, 2017, 05:59:18 pm 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by dhibbard
The District of Columbia Musical World

 7 
 on: August 23, 2017, 05:53:29 pm 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by dhibbard
yep.. it has already been used:


 The quarterly journal Modern Music was first published in New York under the title League of Composers Review from February 1924 through January 1925. In April 1925 the title was changed to Modern Music and publication continued uninterrupted under this name until the fall issue of 1946. The purpose of the journal was to inform American professional musicians and the American (and European) public about the new idioms and styles of twentieth-century music. According to the editor Minna Lederman, “Modern Music had no fixed editorial position about any composer, any movement. Its pages recorded derogatory opinions about, as well as homage to, even the greatest figures of the age—Schoenberg and Stravinsky, who were under its most constant observation.”

Each issue of the journal is divided into two parts. The first contains a series of informative articles dealing with the promotion and concerns of contemporary music in the three decades of the journal’s publication: biographies of the leading composers and analyses of their principal works; explanations of contemporary compositional procedures; reports on conditions for music performance and publication in Europe, the Soviet Union and the Americas; the politics of music brought about by the threat and reality of various forms of fascism. The second part contains reviews of contemporary compositions performed in the major musical centers of the United States and in the capitals of Europe and South America. The interpretive and technical skills of performers are not the subjects of these reviews. Rather, Modern Music’s reviewers deal almost exclusively with specific compositions and the analysis of compositional methods. These reviews are followed by the “Scores and Records” column in which the production, growth and availability of contemporary music, both recorded and in print, are examined. Thereafter follows the “Over the Air” column that chronicles both the rise and fall of modern music in radio broadcasting, and the growth of the network giants in the United States, such as the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), the National Broadcasting Corporation (NBC), the Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS), and the American Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

http://www.ripm.org/?page=JournalInfo&ABB=MMU


 8 
 on: August 23, 2017, 11:00:55 am 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by christopher
Con Tempo

 9 
 on: August 23, 2017, 06:27:47 am 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by Neil McGowan
. Until Gerard comes clean about his specific concerns on this,

I'm not sure Gerald has a casting vote on the matter :-)  Nor does it matter if we reach concensus or not - since it's most likely composers will continue to reserve the right to name their works however they please :-)

As we have seen from the (many) examples quoted during this discussion, there is an established history of composers both adopting generic form-titles (with numeration), as well as adopting descriptive titles of their own choosing and format.  Sometimes both have been combined... a numbered piano sonata or symphony which also, in parallel, has some name of the composer's choosing, for example.           

The imagination of the listening public can often be more effectively captured by a descriptive title...  'Eroica' is a more winning name than 'Symphony No 3'.  In the case of today's exceptionally prolific symphonists, some kind of name serves as a reminder as to exactly which one 'Number 87' actually was. Probably the same is true of other genres - despite liking what I hear, I really can't remember the numbers of all John White's piano sonatas.
.                                                                     

 10 
 on: August 22, 2017, 11:57:12 pm 
Started by Ian Moore - Last post by ahinton
But "Seven States of Rain" (and there are many worse) tells the listener nothing except that the composer is rather pretentious.

I'm largely with you up to that point...  but then the iceberg starts to melt for me.

What is that makes "Seven States Of Rain" pretentious (if, let us say, the composer seriously intended to portray different kinds of precipitation as music), but "Four Sea Interludes" is perfectly fine? Or indeed, Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the countryside ?

I can't help feeling that the criteria here are not being used in a fair and comparable way. Works we know (and, perhaps, love) are allowed to have 'programmatic' titles - but works (or composers) we sneer at are denied the same right. The example of Herodotus is very telling, since appeals to classical antiquity (no matter how tenuous in reality) have long been a handy get-out. Stravinsky, for example, could be accused of getting away with blue murder in this area Wink  Yet had the composer of "Seven States Of Rain" only named their piece La Tempestata di Mare, they would already be on the A-Level Set Works list.

This, however, may reflect our ingrained tendency to adore the old, and deride the new - regardless of actual merits, and it might well be a societal prejudice. There's even a website which officially (!) derides music written after 1918, for example.
All very valid points, for which many thanks. Until Gerard comes clean about his specific concerns on this, we'll simply have to wait for him to do so and consider what he has to say but, in the meantime, I cannot help but suspect that his allegiances ally with one Johannes Brahms, although even he wrote Ein Deutsches Requiem, Schicksalslied and other works not called "piano trio no. ×" or "sonata no. ×"; maybe Gerard is prepared to make exceptions for vocal works but, until he tells us, we can't reasonably be expecgted to know...

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