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 1 
 on: Today at 07:13:51 pm 
Started by kyjo - Last post by Lionel Harrison


This makes for an interesting (and very fine) change from the usual suspects!

 2 
 on: Today at 06:54:49 pm 
Started by kyjo - Last post by Lionel Harrison
I think we'll have to agree to disagree on this one! I think the dialogue segments in the 1968 Pirates are funny and entertaining to listen to. The parts are well acted and,vividly,characterised by the performers. I enjoy it every time I listen to it............oh,and the music,as well!! Grin That said,the dialogue in the 1968 Pirates is of an exceptionally high standard & imo,the best of the series. The Pirates also has a more entertaining plot than others in the series. With the exception of Ruddigore! Which was recorded without it.
I must admit that,even though,I like the inclusion of dialogue,do I really,avidly,follow every twist & turn of the plot of The Gondoliers or HMS Pinafore? Well.probably not?!! Although,I found myself pricking up my ears at the jokes about cutting off heads in The Mikado,and wondering how well this might have gone down a few years ago,bearing in mind some of the lurid headlines!! Also,it's true that,as with Offenbach,allot of the in-jokes and parodying of sacred institutions & public figures,which would have cracked up Victorian audiences & which would have  been accompanied by stage action,is lost on present day audiences. And dialogue is,obviously,very hard,even,you might argue,impossible,to reproduce in studio conditions. Particularly,when it is supposed to be funny and witty! And,it wasn't supposed to be listened to in that way,anyway!!
There,you see! I'm even destroying my own argument for dialogue,now! Grin (And this from a man who professes to enjoy listening to dialogue in languages he can't understand! Roll Eyes)


I have a lot of respect for a man who can argue himself tightly into a corner and then out again at once. It reminds me of those old radio serials where, at the end of one episode, the hero was in dire peril but at the beginning of the next the narrator would simply announce "And with one bound, he was free!!"  Grin Grin


Where's Albion,by the way? (I miss his humour!) I fear my long-winded posts have driven him away! I must learn to make them more succinct! Roll Eyes

I don't know where Albion's gone but I miss his humour too. I know your expansive (as opposed to "long-winded") posts won't have driven him away because in the past when you have wondered whether you could be more succinct he has protested, saying how much he enjoys your style. I, too, very much look forward to reading what I might describe as your "stream of consciousness" posts. They often cause me to think mightily (as my old dad would have said) and sometimes to laugh uproariously! They often make my day, in fact.  Grin So keep 'em coming, please.

 3 
 on: Today at 05:26:12 pm 
Started by kyjo - Last post by cilgwyn
I think we'll have to agree to disagree on this one! I think the dialogue segments in the 1968 Pirates are funny and entertaining to listen to. The parts are well acted and,vividly,characterised by the performers. I enjoy it every time I listen to it............oh,and the music,as well!! Grin That said,the dialogue in the 1968 Pirates is of an exceptionally high standard & imo,the best of the series. The Pirates also has a more entertaining plot than others in the series. With the exception of Ruddigore! Which was recorded without it.
I must admit that,even though,I like the inclusion of dialogue,do I really,avidly,follow every twist & turn of the plot of The Gondoliers or HMS Pinafore? Well.probably not?!! Although,I found myself pricking up my ears at the jokes about cutting off heads in The Mikado,and wondering how well this might have gone down a few years ago,bearing in mind some of the lurid headlines!! Also,it's true that,as with Offenbach,allot of the in-jokes and parodying of sacred institutions & public figures,which would have cracked up Victorian audiences & which would have  been accompanied by stage action,is lost on present day audiences. And dialogue is,obviously,very hard,even,you might argue,impossible,to reproduce in studio conditions. Particularly,when it is supposed to be funny and witty! And,it wasn't supposed to be listened to in that way,anyway!!
There,you see! I'm even destroying my own argument for dialogue,now! Grin (And this from a man who professes to enjoy listening to dialogue in languages he can't understand! Roll Eyes)

I do,actually,prefer to listen to Gilbert and Sullivan without dialogue,as well,though! These days,I'm probably more in line with you,in some ways. But I do still enjoy it,at times. Which is why I have collected allot of those Ohio Light Opera recordings. Although,if they were as bad as Oakapple seem to think they are,even I wouldn't have bothered! (The ones to avoid are the ones with a chap called John Pickles in the cast! Shocked Roll Eyes He seems to have left the OHO now,anyway. Or,hopefully,got sacked!! Smiley)
Anyway,what are you moaning about Lionel?! Grin You've got the Sargent Pirates with Brannigan and all the other Glyndebourne recordings,without dialogue! And virtually every D'Oyly Carte. We pro-dialoguer's got a measly five D'Oyly Carte recordings,to listen to Sad,and the Marriner Yeomen (although we had to wait a bit,for that!)!! Sad Grin

Where's Albion,by the way? (I miss his humour!) I fear my long-winded posts have driven him away! I must learn to make them more succinct! Roll Eyes

 4 
 on: Today at 08:42:20 am 
Started by kyjo - Last post by Lionel Harrison

I think that if every recording with dialogue was as good as that one,it wouldn't be quite such a problem for some people! But,if you still can't stand dialogue,Owen Brannigan,conveniently,recorded the part for emi,as you know! And,I often,just want to enjoy the music,so........ Smiley Smiley Smiley

We buy records so we can listen to stuff more than once and I find that on repeated hearings dialogue becomes irritating. I'd far rather do without it. I can read up about the plot if I feel the need -- not that I do for the works of Sullivan, of course!  Grin 

 5 
 on: Today at 12:44:47 am 
Started by kyjo - Last post by cilgwyn
Gilbert and Sullivan: The Pirates of Penzance Soloists,D'Oyly Carte Opera Chorus/ Isidore Godfrey    Decca 2 cd's 

Aharr & Shiver me Timbers! This is the 1968 recording with dialogue. If you do like dialogue,this has got to be the most successful G & S,on cd,with dialogue,imo! And,I'll explain why,in a minute! I used to borrow the original Lp's from the local library,as a youngster;and I still find the dialogue funny and entertaining,to listen to. John Reed is just brilliant as the Major-General. Donald Adams is a rip-roaring Pirate King;and the clincher,in some ways;Owen Brannigan going way over the top as the Sergeant of Police. What was he on?!! Shocked Grin He's got to be the best ever,next to Kenneth Sandford in the 1957 D'Oyly Carte. Of course,Owen Brannigan recorded the role before,in the Sargent recording. Although,his performance was a bit more restrained. Both recording's are excellent,though!


This was the first recording of The Pirates of Penzance I ever bought and, like you cilgwyn, I think it's a great performace for all the reasons that you state, on top of which I would add Valerie Masterson's terrific Mable.
I think that if every recording with dialogue was as good as that one,it wouldn't be quite such a problem for some people! But,if you still can't stand dialogue,Owen Brannigan,conveniently,recorded the part for emi,as you know! And,I often,just want to enjoy the music,so........ Smiley Smiley Smiley

 6 
 on: June 17, 2021, 08:47:28 am 
Started by kyjo - Last post by Lionel Harrison
Gilbert and Sullivan: The Pirates of Penzance Soloists,D'Oyly Carte Opera Chorus/ Isidore Godfrey    Decca 2 cd's 

Aharr & Shiver me Timbers! This is the 1968 recording with dialogue. If you do like dialogue,this has got to be the most successful G & S,on cd,with dialogue,imo! And,I'll explain why,in a minute! I used to borrow the original Lp's from the local library,as a youngster;and I still find the dialogue funny and entertaining,to listen to. John Reed is just brilliant as the Major-General. Donald Adams is a rip-roaring Pirate King;and the clincher,in some ways;Owen Brannigan going way over the top as the Sergeant of Police. What was he on?!! Shocked Grin He's got to be the best ever,next to Kenneth Sandford in the 1957 D'Oyly Carte. Of course,Owen Brannigan recorded the role before,in the Sargent recording. Although,his performance was a bit more restrained. Both recording's are excellent,though!


This was the first recording of The Pirates of Penzance I ever bought and, like you cilgwyn, I think it's a great performace for all the reasons that you state, on top of which I would add Valerie Masterson's terrific Mable.

 7 
 on: June 17, 2021, 03:23:01 am 
Started by kyjo - Last post by cilgwyn
Gilbert and Sullivan: The Pirates of Penzance Soloists,D'Oyly Carte Opera Chorus/ Isidore Godfrey    Decca 2 cd's 

Aharr & Shiver me Timbers! This is the 1968 recording with dialogue. If you do like dialogue,this has got to be the most successful G & S,on cd,with dialogue,imo! And,I'll explain why,in a minute! I used to borrow the original Lp's from the local library,as a youngster;and I still find the dialogue funny and entertaining,to listen to. John Reed is just brilliant as the Major-General. Donald Adams is a rip-roaring Pirate King;and the clincher,in some ways;Owen Brannigan going way over the top as the Sergeant of Police. What was he on?!! Shocked Grin He's got to be the best ever,next to Kenneth Sandford in the 1957 D'Oyly Carte. Of course,Owen Brannigan recorded the role before,in the Sargent recording. Although,his performance was a bit more restrained. Both recording's are excellent,though!





 8 
 on: June 16, 2021, 05:20:48 pm 
Started by kyjo - Last post by Lionel Harrison
Vortex
The Desford Colliery Caterpillar Band
James Watson (conductor)

(Radio 3 Composer of the Week: Robert Simpson:  Episode 5)

Interesting! Very much like one of those symphonies;but with just the brass,of course! I may listen to another episode?

This has interrupted my Gilbert and Sullivan marathon!!!

I would imagine that a Gilbert and Sullivan marathon is a somewhat less taxing (and, dare one say it, a more enjoyable) experience than a Simpson marathon which, while worthy (and worthwhile, of course!), must be pretty demanding, at least intellectually.

 9 
 on: June 16, 2021, 05:14:55 pm 
Started by kyjo - Last post by Lionel Harrison
Radio 3 Composer of the Week: Robert Simpson     Episode 5 "The End is C Sharp"
I liked the excerpt from his String Quartet No 13! Unfortunately,as you point out;there's just isn't enough time to explore everything. And Robert Simpson composed allot of quartets (I don't want start up that path! The expense!! Sad)

That's a good point, well made: not only isn't there enough time to explore everything, there isn't enough mazuma in the bank either!

 10 
 on: June 16, 2021, 04:59:30 pm 
Started by kyjo - Last post by cilgwyn
Regarding Owen Brannigan's 'sonorous' vocal chords! Indeed! There was a family living me near for a while! They used to stay up late,playing music and talking! I think they were East European? They seemed nice people;but the car park was full of little kid's screaming & shouting,for hours on end at times!! Shocked Roll Eyes Grin The man had a deep,sonorous rumbling voice,which seemed to carry all over the place. It wasn't so much that it was loud;it just seemed to rumble away. I'd be thinking,'Where's it coming from?' It seemed to penetrate ever corner and,yet,as I say,it wasn't,particularly,loud! In fact,it was quite a nice voice! Just a low,sonorous,all pervading,omnipotent rumble!! Shocked Grin

Composer of the Week: Robert Simpson     Episode 4  (Nearing end of program):

Eppur si muove for organ - Ricercar
Iain Quinn (organ)

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