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1  Preliminaries / Greetings / Re: Hello, music fellows! on: June 12, 2019, 05:37:01 am
welcome !!! 
2  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Re: Tchaikovsky's original Piano Concerto No 1 on: June 09, 2019, 05:05:30 pm
yes, it was thought that the individual who played the premier of the work, edited it out with a pencil because either it was too hard to play or too long.  Jurgensen, then apparently, agreed to make the cuts.  There is a lot of information on the web about that matter.
3  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Re: Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - ) on: May 13, 2019, 12:28:08 am
There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?

I am looking in the Ho/Feofanov Dictionary of Soviet Composers and they state his pupils include Gauk, Kamensky, Kreek, Ovchinnikov, and Prokofiev.   His 3 symphonies were written 1907, 1924 and 1928.   No references to any Melodiya recordings.

I did find that his symphonies were published by Jurgenson in Moscow and Leipzig..... chances are they may have been performed somewhere but known recordings are not found.

Can someone access the National Library of Russia to see if his symphonies are located there?   I don't see anything in the worldcat.
4  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Re: Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - 1938) on: May 12, 2019, 11:46:16 pm
I would bet that one of the symphonies was released on a 78 album
5  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Re: Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - ) on: May 12, 2019, 08:30:01 pm
There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?

I am looking in the Ho/Feofanov Dictionary of Soviet Composers and they state his pupils include Gauk, Kamensky, Kreek, Ovchinnikov, and Prokofiev.   His 3 symphonies were written 1907, 1924 and 1928.   No references to any Melodiya recordings.

I did find that his symphonies were published by Jurgenson in Moscow and Leipzig..... chances are they may have been performed somewhere but known recordings are not found.
6  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Re: Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - ) on: May 12, 2019, 04:57:07 am
There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?

I am looking in the Ho/Feofanov Dictionary of Soviet Composers and they state his pupils include Gauk, Kamensky, Kreek, Ovchinnikov, and Prokofiev.   His 3 symphonies were written 1907, 1924 and 1928.   No references to any Melodiya recordings.
7  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Re: Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - ) on: May 11, 2019, 11:04:57 pm
thank you !!!    I don't in the documentation that any of his symphonic works were ever recorded...  esp. his 3 symphonies.    Another lost and unrecorded student of Rimsky.
8  Little-known music of all eras / Rare scores / Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - 1938) on: May 11, 2019, 06:19:43 am
https://urresearch.rochester.edu/institutionalPublicationPublicView.action?institutionalItemId=34531&versionNumber=1

Recently, saw where Sibley Library published this composers piano work from 1900 published by Jurgenson in Moscow  " Les Fleurs 12 morceaux pour piano. "

I am not familiar with this composer also spelled as M Tschernow or Tschernov  or just Chernov.


 
9  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Heinrich Sutermeister Orchestral Works from Toccata on: May 09, 2019, 11:42:17 pm
Here is his obit:

The Swiss composer Heinrich Sutermeister wrote chamber music, cantatas, and several concertos for piano, cello and clarinet, but it is his operas for theatre, radio and television, that are best known and will be remembered longest.

Usually providing his own texts, Sutermeister adapted works by Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Wilde and Stevenson during the 50 years that he was actively engaged in writing operas. His first major success, Romeo and Juliet, was, according to the 1954 edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ``after Rosenkavalier . . . the most frequently performed modern opera''. A later opera, Raskolnikoff, reached La Scala, Milan, while others were staged in Munich and Berlin. From 1963 to 1975 Sutermeister taught composition at the Hanover Hochschule fr Musik.

The chief influences in forming Sutermeister's style were Arthur Honegger, who first inspired him to write music, and Carl Orff, with whom he studied for a time. He particularly admired the Verdi/Boito Otello and Falstaff, and also Debussy's Pellas et Mlisande, striving in his own operas to combine musical and dramatic expression in the manner of those masterpieces. When, in the Fifties and Sixties, he was considered old-fashioned, he found his own audience with hugely successful television operas.


Sutermeister was born in Feuerthalen, in the canton of Schaffhausen. After studying philology in Basle and Paris, in 1931 he turned to musicology at Basle University. From 1932 to 1934 he attended the Akademie der Tonkunst in Munich, where his teachers included Walter Courvoisier, Hans Pfitzner and Carl Orff. Returning to Switzerland, he worked for a year as a rptiteur at the Municipal Theatre in Berne, before becoming a full-time composer. Sutermeister's first opera, Die schwarze Spinne, with text by A. Rosler, was written for radio and broadcast in 1936. A stage version was performed at St Gall in 1949. Meanwhile, his ballet Das Dorf unter dem Gletscher was danced at Karlsruhe in 1937 and followed in 1938 by Andreas Gryphius, the first of eight cantatas that he wrote, and one of his finest early works.

Romeo and Juliet, for which Sutermeister made his own adaptation of Shakespeare's tragedy, was commissioned by Karl Bhm, who conducted the premiere at the Dresden State Opera in 1940. Maria Cebotari, the soprano for whom the part of Juliet was specially written, scored a great personal triumph. The opera, too, was very successful and for the next 20 years continued to appear frequently in German-speaking theatres. Die Zauberinsel, adapted from The Tempest, was also given its first performance at Dresden, in 1942, but proved less popular than his previous Shakespeare setting.

Sutermeister's next theatre piece was Niobe, a monodrama with text by his brother Peter, first performed at Zurich in 1946. Combining speech, choral music and dance, this work most clearly shows the influence of Orff. For the opera which followed, Sutermeister went to Stockholm, where Raskolnikoff was premiered at The Royal Swedish Opera on 14 October 1948. The text, based on Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, was again by Peter Sutermeister. Though the musical idiom of Raskolnikoff remains as easy to assimilate, the dramatic structure has become more complicated than in Sutermeister's earlier operas: two separate orchestras illustrate the outer and inner life of the protagonist, who is represented by two different singers, a tenor and a bass. I went to a performance of Raskolnikoff in Stockholm at that time and found it an utterly absorbing experience, which still remains vivid after 47 years. Though less generally popular than Romeo and Julieta, it was staged in a number of other theatres, including La Scala, where it received four performances in 1950, conducted by Issay Dobrowen, who had conducted the premiere.

A variety of works followed: two radio-ballads, Fingerhtchen and Die Fsse im Feuer, were broadcast in 1950, and respectively staged in St Gall and at the City Opera, Berlin, later the same year. Der Rote Steifel, the adaptation of a fairy tale by Wilhelm Hauff, Das Kalte Hertz, was performed at Stockholm in 1951. Titus Feuerfuchs, a burlesque opera based on Nestroy's Der Talisman, scored some success in Basle in 1958, although the composer was accused of diluting the satire of the original. However, two television operas were extremely popular: Seraphine (1959), a comic opera after Rabelais, was staged at the Cuvillis Theatre, Munich, in 1960; while Das Gespenst von Canterville (1964), based on Oscar Wilde's story "The Canterville Ghost", was even more successful. Der Flaschenteufel ("The Bottle Imp"), adapted by R.K. Weibel from a story by Robert Louis Stevenson, was screened on German television in 1971.

10  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Rubinstein Piano Concertos #3 and #5 with the ERSO on: May 05, 2019, 03:07:56 am
Can we correct the title of this thread?  Grin

sorry  didn't realize I had misspelled the title.... that's what I get when I don't wear my glasses (spectacles).
11  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Rubinstein Piano Concertos #3 and #5 with the ERSO on: May 03, 2019, 12:15:27 am
I have heard the beginning of the Rubinstein 5th on this release, and being used to the more placid tempos of the Allegro moderato from the Ruiz and Banowetz recordings, it sounds way too rushed to me.

Yes the Banowetz is my go to recording...  haven't heard it yet, but Jarvi tends to move at a faster tempo than others... Banowetz still teaches at the Univ of N Texas School of Music in piano performance.
12  Preliminaries / Greetings / Re: I'm baaaaaaaaaaaaack! on: May 02, 2019, 02:45:46 pm
I can understand the argument too, Dave. The point though is that you do have these cds in your collection and Naxos is a rich company issuing lots and lots of cds. The fear is that the small companies, selling only a couple of thousand copies of a cd if they are lucky, will disappear if folk upload to YT and potential purchasers download for free.
Learning that Toccata was about to issue some Sutermeister I looked to see whether there was more on disc. I could have downloaded the Piano Concerto No.2 but I ordered the Swiss cd instead because I happen to think that is the better thing to do.


Yes... funny I just ordered the same CD also.. looking forward to hearing it!
13  Preliminaries / Greetings / Re: I'm baaaaaaaaaaaaack! on: May 02, 2019, 06:11:55 am
yes it is a somewhat contentious position... I see both sides of the argument,......   there have been many CDs in my collection that I now own, whereby I listened to most of the CD on youtube and decided I wanted to own that for my drive in to work or drive home from work in my car.   I still find it interesting that Naxos uploads the whole CD onto youtube, whereby one can listen for free... I don't know if that contributed to my 2000+ Naxos collection.... maybe it worked??!?    Dave
14  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Ukrainian Piano Music on: May 02, 2019, 05:59:41 am
http://www.sorelmusic.org/Sorel/Home.html
15  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Ukrainian Piano Music on: May 02, 2019, 05:57:09 am
Fanfare Magazine, Dave Saemann

In 39:5 I had the pleasure of reviewing pianist Anna Shelest’s debut CD, Spirit and Romance. That CD was underwritten by the Sorel Organization, which has since lent its support to a number of albums by Shelest, the latest being the subject of this review, Ukrainian Rhapsody. I also reviewed a duo recording in 39:5 by Anna and her pianist husband, Dmitri Shelest, entitled Tutti. The Shelests are one of the best piano duos since Robert and Gaby Casadesus, and it is with great pleasure that I welcome Dmitri’s participation in Ukrainian Rhapsody. There is much to say about Anna Shelest as a soloist. She has all the technique one could ask for, and, when she wishes to, can produce a beautifully rounded, elegant tone. At times, as in the title work of this CD, Anna even can seem demonic. She is a musician of superb taste, which is evidenced in the fine selection of pieces on the present record. Ukrainian Rhapsody proves that there is much more to composers born in that country than Prokofiev, whom I would note Anna already has recorded. Both Shelests were born in Ukraine, and clearly take great pride in the accomplishments of composers from their native land. Given the military tensions between Ukraine and Russia in recent years, one also may see Ukrainian Rhapsody as a patriotic gesture on the part of the pianists. That said, there is not a weak piece on the album. The Shelests justify their endeavor here through the quality of the music and the astuteness of their interpretations.

Mykola Lysenko, the father of Ukrainian music, also was an ethnographer. His Suite on Ukrainian Themes is patterned after Bach’s partitas, being a set mainly of dances. Its Prelude is a homage to the First Prelude of The Well-Tempered Clavier. The Courante is a mixture of courtly and peasant dance music. Bach’s Two-Part Inventions seem to have inspired the Toccata. The Sarabanda almost feels like the work of one of the French clavecinists. A theme and variations, the Gavotte reminds me in places of Ukrainian themes in Tchaikovsky’s “Little Russian” Symphony. The Scherzo is a bright, witty send-off for the Suite. The Overture to Lysenko’s opera Taras Bulba evokes the melodic elegance, richness, and panache of Borodin. It is heard here in a four-hand arrangement by Lysenko’s student and exponent Levko Revutsky. The latter’s Preludes on this CD are beautifully wrought compositions. Op. 4/1 seems to draw its atmosphere from Debussy. No. 2 is reminiscent of Rachmaninoff in its artful deployment of the keyboard. The two op. 7 Preludes share the exotic perfumes of early Scriabin. Revutsky’s Waltz in B♭ is a salon piece that would sit very comfortably beside Tchaikovsky’s The Seasons. Shelest subtly teases out every last bit of its faded elegance. Alexander Zhuk’s Ukrainian Rhapsody is a Lisztian canvas with the raw colors of Kandinsky. Distant echoes of Paganini’s wildness can be heard in it.

The one living composer on the CD, Myroslav Skoryk, reminds me of Malcolm Arnold in his eclecticism and embrace of styles from popular music His Three Extravagant Dances open with an “Entrance and Dance,” which plays with a tango rhythm saturated with the deep colors of southern Spain. “Blues,” marked “Almost American,” would not seem out of place under the fingers of Dick Hyman. The Shelests feel very comfortable with their adopted country’s musical idiom, down to the quotation from Dvořák’s “New World” Symphony. The concluding “Can-Can” is a vaudeville turn by a dance team. The CD’s sound engineering is excellent. Ukrainian Rhapsody makes the best imaginable case for the music of the Shelests’ native land. Pianophiles will want it for its stirring performances of rare repertory. Highly recommended
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