The Art-Music Forum
August 20, 2019, 03:53:52 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Here you may discover hundreds of little-known composers, hear thousands of long-forgotten compositions, contribute your own rare (non-copyright) recordings, and discuss all the Arts in an erudite and decorous atmosphere full of freedom and delight. To participate, simply log in or register.
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

  Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 23
1  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Heinz Winbeck - 5 symphonies on: August 18, 2019, 03:16:54 pm
"Inverted Mahler" was no more than my haphazard reaction to one section of one Symphony, not a summary of Winbeck's whole symphonic output, - but I still say the "Choral" movement of his Symphony 2 resembles the last movement of Mahler 3 in its cadence of reaching for or opening to transcendence and apotheosis, but the intrusions of disturbance and unrest into which finally undermine and demolish that.  There seems some experiential relation up to a point, but then with disjunctive outcome.

I came off way too harsh in my response.  I agree with my sentiment just not as strongly as I might have voiced it.  Your point makes sense and I can hear that in the music too.
2  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Heinz Winbeck - 5 symphonies on: August 18, 2019, 01:21:28 am
I haven't heard of this composer before, but am enjoying this output so far.  Am on Symphony No. 2.  It is modern but very approachable.  No worse than late Shostakovitch but sometimes has Mahler quotes for some nice sense of catharsis.  Thanks for recommending this composer, I'm enjoying discovering him.

I hear the last movement of Symphony 2 as rather an inversion of Mahlerian catharsis, - compare with the last movement of Mahler's Symphony 3 which it sounds similar to, but then moves and concludes antithetically, - the benediction become ominous and even menacing.


I don't think I can agree with you when there are so many direct quotes of preexisting music.  In fact, I am now at No. 5 (I couldn't find No. 4) so I feel I have a good sense of what he does.  I like it very much but can't say it is an inversion of Mahler because it is direct quotes sort of out out of order.  I know quite a few composer friends that this would thoroughly piss them off to literally go to the library quote one of the greatest composers but put their music out of order and that becomes your new symphony.  I take it he wasn't highly regarded at home?  He doesn't sound similar to Mahler 3, he is quoting Mahler 3 then doesn't quote him.  IN CONTRAST, you have the collage of Schnittke who does a Bach style chorale but the music is completely original but evoking the style of Bach.  Winbech is not doing that.  Now, I'm in his No. 5, the Bruckner 9 tribute where I'm hearing long swathes of sequences based on passages from that symphony.  Contrast this with Rautavaara Symphony No. 3 which uses Bruckner 3 dramatic and orchestrational devises in his own way much more successfully.  My final thoughts after listening to hours of his symphonies, it is too bad that this is relegated to pastiche.  He has great technique and skill but I wish he would have incorporated the tradition rather than mimicked it.
3  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Heinz Winbeck - 5 symphonies on: August 17, 2019, 04:30:38 pm
I haven't heard of this composer before, but am enjoying this output so far.  Am on Symphony No. 2.  It is modern but very approachable.  No worse than late Shostakovitch but sometimes has Mahler quotes for some nice sense of catharsis.  Thanks for recommending this composer, I'm enjoying discovering him.
4  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: William Wordsworth Orchestral Music Vol.2 on: August 06, 2019, 01:26:59 am
I just listened to this recording and it is absolutely lovely.  Highly recommended.  The piano concerto is dramatic and lyrical, very concise.  The 3 Pastoral sketches are just gorgeous with a sense of longing and atmosphere.  The violin concerto reminds me somewhat of Kenneth Leighton in that it is lyrical, dramatic, and mystical.  Performance and sound are excellent.  Can't wait for further releases.
5  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Piano concertos by Ruth Gipps and Dora Bright on: August 03, 2019, 01:54:07 am
This is on its way from Somm at the end of the month:

https://www.somm-recordings.com/recording/piano-concertos-by-dora-bright-and-ruth-gipps/

Sounds lovely, and I am especially keen to hear the Gipps pieces (and remain optimistic that Chandos may come up with a Volume 2 of her Symphonies)  Cool

Oooh, that looks great!   Shocked
6  Little-known music of all eras / Coming broadcasts and listen-later links / Re: Christopher Gunning Symphony 2 on: July 20, 2019, 02:06:24 am
The Symphony No. 2 posted was excellent.  I am happy to purchase this and further releases from Gunning, it is very much worthy of being heard.
7  Little-known music of all eras / Coming broadcasts and listen-later links / Re: Christopher Gunning Symphony 2 on: July 18, 2019, 03:07:48 pm
Quote
This and the Korngold seem to be studio recordings for commercial release later.

P

On Kenneth Woods website, his blog/diary has the entry:

4-6 April - Ken records three new symphonies by Christopher Gunning for Signum Records with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales

So two more as well as the second - has Christopher G now added Symphonies 8 & 9 to his canon?

He's passed 11 symphonies.
8  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Joseph Holbrooke from CPO on: July 08, 2019, 01:28:33 am
I am not a big admirer of Holbrooke's works.  Just don't think it has staying power with me or anything I would want to hear again.  Am I missing something? 
9  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: Anthony Hedges (1931-2019) on: July 06, 2019, 03:38:23 pm
Thanks for informing of the passing of this seriously neglected composer.  Alot of his music can be heard here and is very much worth exploring:
https://soundcloud.com/anthony-hedges
10  Little-known music of all eras / Coming broadcasts and listen-later links / Re: Classical Podcasts: Buried Treasure: Music of Iceland pt. on: July 04, 2019, 01:10:21 am
Thank you, from the US.  It is bittersweet.  Mostly bitter. Cry
11  Little-known music of all eras / Coming broadcasts and listen-later links / Re: Classical Podcasts: The Music of Iceland on: June 20, 2019, 03:39:56 pm
This is a very fine release of exclusively younger Icelandic composers and well worth exploring.

https://www.amazon.com/Recurrence-BLU-RAY-Iceland-Symphony-Orchestra/dp/B06XD1KGQ5
12  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: SOME unrecorded British Violin Concertos, 1943-2009 on: June 20, 2019, 03:36:54 pm
A more "restrained" response would be helpful😉You will, I hope, note the inclusion of the violin concerto by a certain Bourgeois

I did.  Smiley
13  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: SOME unrecorded British Violin Concertos, 1943-2009 on: June 20, 2019, 12:57:50 am
I love you Dundonnell.  Grin
14  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: SOME unrecorded British Piano Concertos, 1934-94 on: June 18, 2019, 03:24:34 pm
I too hope that Bourgeois's day will come. You mention Havergal Brian and Rued Langgaard. As far as Brian is concerned the rediscovery of his music began towards the end of his very long life and was inspired by the promotion of the music by his passionate advocate the composer Robert Simpson. Simpson was, at that time, a BBC Music Producer and used that position to get Brian's symphonies performed and broadcast. Since then the dedicated support and financial power of the Havergal Brian Society has enormously facilitated the recording of the music.

What is required to revive a neglected composer's music is a combination of factors. It helps if the music is broacast. In the UK that means that the BBC has to demonstrate an interest. BBC music producers have to be aware of the composer's existence and willing to push for broadcast performances. There have to be conductors willing to learn the music. This is less likely nowadays when there are fewer British conductors regularly conducting regional orchestras.

Record companies are also crucial. The reality again nowadays is that companies like to record a series of a composer's music. This is where the sheer number of Bourgeois's symphonies works to his disadvantage. Had he composed a dozen or so then he would have more appeal to a label which might show some interest.

It is, sadly, not necessarily a reflection on the quality of the music but is more to do with the interest/support of those who have the required influence. This is the difficulty Bourgeois faces.

Harsh reality......but never give up!

I agree with all you said.  He is actually quite popular and well performed in the concert wind world and especially Asia (which came as a surprise to him).  His first 7 symphonies were all broadcast by the BBC which was the point where he retired and moved to Mallorca and became explosively productive.  You don't think it will be more like Weinberg (I forget how many symphonies he composed) but there are so many that no single record company records would record it but a few symphonies show up here and there in a variety of labels and in time we get all of them?  Also working against him, some of these very prolific composers like Brian and Langgaard also wrote some quite short symphonies so it's not unusual to see four symphonies in a single release.  With Bourgeois, they are long symphonies with very few short ones.  Still, I hold out that a musicologist or someone will investigate the wealth of his oeuvre and put together a reasonable first orchestral project which could build up interest in conductors, broadcasters, public.   I get that this is a bit of a chicken and egg problem.  Till then, I will have hope.
15  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: SOME unrecorded British Piano Concertos, 1934-94 on: June 18, 2019, 01:14:23 am
The problem with the concept is that while Aho is probably Finland's most prominent living composer and certainly the most recorded Bourgeois had been virtually ignored since his first half dozen or so symphonies. The idea of a whole concert of hia music was perhaps a bit unrealistic.

......but clearly neglect did not deter Bourgeois- which was entirely admirable of course.

I don't think Public Relations skills should be a requirement for a composer's music being worthy of being easily available (or it shouldn't be).  Bourgeois' day will come like Havergal Brian, Rued Langgaard, and others whose verbose talent patiently lied in wait.  I do wonder if Derek would be more popular had he died in 2003 when he had 15 epic symphonies?  Should Mahler be less regarded given his 10 symphonies if he lived another 10 years and wrote 5 more symphonies?  What if Shostakovich wrote 25 symphonies because he lived another decade? Would Wagner be more valid if he died after Das Rheingold?  Yes, yes, I know this is an exercise in futility but ultimately there is one conclusion.  We are left to judge them with what they have left behind.  The fact that Derek went on to write a million more symphonies should not be held against him.  He merely gave up on the system and wrote without regard to securing a performance.  I don't know if this is the case with composers in England, but in America, did you know that nearly all composers spend most of their time NOT composing but with various business activities?  I was surprised to learn that a successful composer I know spends maybe two to three hours a day on creative efforts.  The huge bulk of time is various promotion.  What output would a composer create if they no longer cared about that other 75% of their day?  Mahler basically composed in the summer.  What if he created all year long, what gems might we today enjoy?  An opera of his?  A Violin Concerto?  His completed Symphony No. 10, maybe 11?  Virtually no contemporary composer can afford this scenario but a few can.  Derek did and he shouldn't be dismissed because of that.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 23
Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy