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1  Little-known music of all eras / Notice of interesting concerts around the world / Re: Centenary of October Revolution Concerto on: December 20, 2017, 12:58:10 am
II Concerto:Scherbachev,Polovinkin and Zaderatsky on electrification


Hello Toby - do you know if this concert was broadcast / recorded?
2  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: "Servilia" - opera by Rimsky-Korsakov on: December 11, 2017, 12:23:46 pm
Thank you all. I'm very interested in Russian opera. I've ordered the Cui " Puss in Boots". Should I getn The Serov "Judith"?


Yes it's enjoyable.  Holofernes's War Song is a highlight - it's sung powerfully here by Boris Gmyria - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njLTXTkoKDM
3  Little-known music of all eras / Books about composers and their music / Re: Stalin's Music Prize: Soviet Culture and PoliticsMay 24, 2016 on: December 07, 2017, 10:43:38 am
check it out at your local library.

Or wait until copies appear at the garbage tip. Citing Taruskin as a source is already a clue to this book's worthlessness.

Why's that?  (Genuine question - I haven't heard of Taruskin...)
4  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: "Servilia" - opera by Rimsky-Korsakov on: December 07, 2017, 10:40:02 am
Sorry, should have been more clear. On YouTube there are a couple of short video clips - one from a modern production by Junge Oper Hannover, posted last year.

And there's one that actually turns out to be a crowdfunding promo from 2015. It was to fund Opera for Bulgaria (?) to produce Puss in Boots and Little Red Riding Hood by Cui. I don't know if anything came of it.

Thanks - do you have the links for these?
5  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: "Servilia" - opera by Rimsky-Korsakov on: December 06, 2017, 02:43:59 pm


There are some other clips on that site that suggest his late childrens' operas are still occasionally revived in eastern Europe.


On which site do you mean Demetrius?

Thanks for the Puss in Boots link!

I have the Christus "bootleg"! It's not particularly memorable tbh..
6  Preliminaries / Greetings / Re: Hello on: December 04, 2017, 12:01:38 pm
Hi Demetrius - my interests are exactly the same.  I've found many rare recordings here and elsewhere.  I look forward to hearing more from you! Am also UK-based.
7  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: "Servilia" - opera by Rimsky-Korsakov on: December 04, 2017, 11:18:41 am
I'm not sure that Russian opera is quite so insular as we might think. Clearly there was a political/cultural element in pre-revolutionary Russian music that was informed by the nationalism so popular across Europe in the nineteenth century but I also think that the success or otherwise of non-Russian/Slavic subjects in opera has been partly affected by what non-Russian audiences/musicologists think Russian music should sound like. In that respect, it has been common in the past for such works to be dismissed as anomalies or not authentic.

Just off the top of my head, I can think of these non-Russian subjects that were set to music by Russian composers, though not all have been recorded:

Dargomyzhsky:

Esmeralda
The Stone Guest

Serov:

Judith

Mussorgsky:

Salammbo

Anton Rubinstein:

Nero

(The latter perhaps most obviously in the context of this discussion, but also several others including his "sacred operas".)

Rimsky-Korsakov:

Mozart and Salieri
Servilia

Tchaikovsky:

The Maid of Orleans
Iolanta

Arensky:

Raphael

S Taneyev:

The Oresteia

Rachmaninov:

Francesca da Rimini
Monna Vanna (incomplete).


Ippolitov-Ivanov:

Ruth

Cui:

William Ratcliffe
Le Filibustier
Angelo
Feast in Time of Plague
Mateo Falcone

plus several others.


----


As a postscript for Hattoff, you can find an English libretto for Servilia here - http://opera.stanford.edu/iu/libretti/servilia.htm   Smiley


Many thanks for this Demetrius.

To your knowledge, have Ruth (Ippolitov-Ivanov), Nero (Rubinstein), or any of the Cui operas (other than Feast) been recorded?

I just found, via wikipedia, a computer (MDI) generated versison of the orchestral introduction to William Ratcliffe here:
http://www.russisches-musikarchiv.de/midi/cui_william-ratcliff-introduktion.mid
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Ratcliff_(Cui)
8  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: "Servilia" - opera by Rimsky-Korsakov on: November 30, 2017, 10:44:22 am
I Have thought a lot about a reply since you first asked for a review. I Have listened to Servilia around eight times and I am getting to know it very well. There are wonderful melodies and brilliant orchestral effects and unusually for Rimsky  some passion. I haven't a clue about the plot or whether it works well as an opera, I like it very much.

This is good to know, thanks Hatoff.  I can fill in on the plot.  Somewhat unusually for Russian opera it's set in classical times* - the story is set in Ancient Rome during Nero's reign.

From wikipedia - Servilia, daughter of the senator Soranus, is desired by her father to contract an alliance with Trasea, but the latter, hearing of her preference for his adopted son Valerius, withdraws his suit. Egnatius, the freedman of Soranus, being enamoured of Servilia, conspires against his master and Trasea, and intimates to Servilia that her submission alone will secure their safety. Valerius has mysteriously disappeared, and Servilia, becoming a convert to Christianity, renounces the World. Called before the tribunal, Trasea and Soranus are sentenced to banishment, while Servilia is awarded to Egnatius. Valerius now returns, bearing a proclamation from Nero that the tribunal is dissolved. The sudden reappearance of her lover causes Servilia's death, and Valerius is only prevented from destroying himself by the intervention of his foster-father. Egnatius, in his woe, invokes the Divine Being, and the rest join him in acclaiming the Christian God.

* - I can think of only a few Russian (recorded) operas set in classical/ancient/Biblical times: Mussorgsky's Salammbo; Serov's Judith....the majority of Russian opera is based on more recent European literature, (Russian) history and also of course Russian fairytales and myth. Fair comment?
9  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: "Servilia" - opera by Rimsky-Korsakov on: November 28, 2017, 10:05:17 am
I am, right now, listening to the new Marinsky DVD of the Tale of the Tsar Saltan.
What, oh what, a disappointment. Is it Gergiev? or whoever rehearsed it for him? the beautiful sprightly melodies have become dirges and the beautiful dirges have become ambient music.
 


What about Servilia though? What impressions would you share?@ Is it worth spending the time to listen through it?
10  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: Obscure Soviet Symphonies... on: November 20, 2017, 02:08:46 pm
whooopps   apparently it was recorded:  A. Ilynsky's Noure et Anitra for large orchestra   does anyone own a listing of the St. Petersburg Academic Symphony Orchestra's self produced CDs  (Академический симфонический оркестр Санкт-Петербургской филармонии)  ??

DO you have more information on this David? What do you mean when you say "apparently"?

A couple of years ago I wrote some discussion here - http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,868.0.html - about a small section of Noure et Anitra (called "Orgy of the Spirits") which was recorded in the 20s or 30s for Hollywood.

I'm trying to locate a copy of the performance.. when I get to Tallinn.

David - did you find anything more out about this apparent Ilynsky recording of Noure et Anitra?
11  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: Mussorgsky but not Ravel on: November 16, 2017, 02:03:31 am
but really, I prefer the piano original to all of them.


Indeed Smiley) Dear old Modeste never gave any hint that it was any kind of 'unfinished' orchestral work... and as you rightly say, his faithful collaborator Rimsky never took on such a project Smiley

There are more than 600 orchestrations of this fabulous work (including one by yours truly which lies somewhere between Tushmalov and Ravel and includes an organ in the final moments)....
If anyone is interested in hearing, here is an excerpt from my version:
http://picosong.com/wnby9


Hello Relm1 - I really like your version of the Catacombs, it is very atmospheric.  Did you orchestrate the whole work?   Is it available to buy or download anywhere?  Please do tell us more, and about yourself as well!

Thank you Christopher.  Yes the whole work was orchestrated but truthfully, the performance wasn't very good and I am not comfortable sharing it all.  Lot's of cracked notes and inconsistent rhythms.  I performed the bass trombone part in the premiere performance and mixed the recording.  Overall it wasn't horrible but isn't what I would consider reflective of my intentions.  My orchestration is 33 minutes long and is scored for 3.3.3.3/4.3.3.1/timp+3/hp/celesta/organ (ad lib)/strings.  I adore the Ravel version but also wanted to make some practical changes.  I simplified some of the orchestration so it would be more playable and less demanding (Ravel does some very complex rhythms and double/triple stops that aren't fully necessary unless you have a suburb orchestra).  In Bydlo, the melody is given to a tuba in a very high register (typically requiring the performer to switch to a euphonium to hit the very high G# notes).  For me, I have the first phrase to the tuba and let the first horn pick up the higher notes.  It is the same note but fits their range better.  So why did Ravel put a tuba in that role?  He either knew that particular tubist could nail it or wanted the note to sound off.  I didn't want that.  I wanted more security.  I will tell you since I was the orchestrator and bass trombonist who sat next to the tuba that they were terrified of what Ravel wanted so my version is more tuba friendly while keeping the same musical intention.  As far as my background, I have a masters degree in composition and have orchestrated or arranged many works.  I have my own version of Bach's fantastic Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor for orchestra and Rachmaninoff's Prelude in B minor that has been performed in concert.  This week my suite of themes of Puccini operas is being performed in concert.  I am currently working on my Symphony No. 2. 



Which orchestra is playing, which conductor etc? And when?  (I am labelling!!)
12  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: Mussorgsky but not Ravel on: November 15, 2017, 03:17:50 pm
Thank you Christopher.  Yes the whole work was orchestrated but truthfully, the performance wasn't very good and I am not comfortable sharing it all.  Lot's of cracked notes and inconsistent rhythms.  I performed the bass trombone part in the premiere performance and mixed the recording.  Overall it wasn't horrible but isn't what I would consider reflective of my intentions.  My orchestration is 33 minutes long and is scored for 3.3.3.3/4.3.3.1/timp+3/hp/celesta/organ (ad lib)/strings.  I adore the Ravel version but also wanted to make some practical changes.  I simplified some of the orchestration so it would be more playable and less demanding (Ravel does some very complex rhythms and double/triple stops that aren't fully necessary unless you have a suburb orchestra).  In Bydlo, the melody is given to a tuba in a very high register (typically requiring the performer to switch to a euphonium to hit the very high G# notes).  For me, I have the first phrase to the tuba and let the first horn pick up the higher notes.  It is the same note but fits their range better.  So why did Ravel put a tuba in that role?  He either knew that particular tubist could nail it or wanted the note to sound off.  I didn't want that.  I wanted more security.  I will tell you since I was the orchestrator and bass trombonist who sat next to the tuba that they were terrified of what Ravel wanted so my version is more tuba friendly while keeping the same musical intention.  As far as my background, I have a masters degree in composition and have orchestrated or arranged many works.  I have my own version of Bach's fantastic Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor for orchestra and Rachmaninoff's Prelude in B minor that has been performed in concert.  This week my suite of themes of Puccini operas is being performed in concert.  I am currently working on my Symphony No. 2.  

Thanks for this Relm1 - that's really interesting, especially about Ravel's torture of the tuba players!  Am I allowed to ask your name?  I will definitely look out for your music.
13  Little-known music of all eras / Discussion of obscure composers / Re: Mussorgsky but not Ravel on: November 14, 2017, 09:55:41 am
but really, I prefer the piano original to all of them.


Indeed Smiley) Dear old Modeste never gave any hint that it was any kind of 'unfinished' orchestral work... and as you rightly say, his faithful collaborator Rimsky never took on such a project Smiley

There are more than 600 orchestrations of this fabulous work (including one by yours truly which lies somewhere between Tushmalov and Ravel and includes an organ in the final moments)....
If anyone is interested in hearing, here is an excerpt from my version:
http://picosong.com/wnby9


Hello Relm1 - I really like your version of the Catacombs, it is very atmospheric.  Did you orchestrate the whole work?   Is it available to buy or download anywhere?  Please do tell us more, and about yourself as well!
14  Little-known music of all eras / New recordings / Re: Grigori Ginzburg (complete?) Recordings on: October 24, 2017, 10:21:05 am
What is on these discs?
15  Little-known music of all eras / Works on the wireless / Re: Ralph Williams - Romance for harmonica, piano and strings (1951) on: October 23, 2017, 10:39:58 am
So this is or isn't RVW?
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