The Art-Music Forum

Little-known music of all eras => Downloads discussion => Topic started by: jowcol on September 06, 2012, 01:18:26 am



Title: Swedish Music
Post by: jowcol on September 06, 2012, 01:18:26 am
Music of Erland Von Koch
REPOST FROM UC-- CHECK THE UC DOWNLOADS FOLDER
(http://www.sequenza21.com/uploaded_images/390-731791.jpg)
None commercially released.

From the collection of Karl Miller


Double Concerto for Violin, Piano and Orchestra (Radio Broadcast, date unknown)
David Bartov, Violin, Inger Witstrom, Piano
Swedish RSO, Göron Alteas, Cond.

Symphony 4 “Sinfonia Seria”

Swedish RSO, Stig Westerberg (Radio Broadcast)

Symphony 5 “Lapponica”

Swedish RSO, Stig Westerberg (Radio Broadcast)

MP3, 192 kps


I’ve posted these in the downloads  from UC Folder.  For those of you (like me) that didn’t know much about him, I’ll provide some added content


From Wikipedia:

Born in Stockholm as the son of composer Sigurd von Koch (1879–1919), Erland von Koch studied at the Stockholm Conservatory from 1931 to 1935 and subsequently passed the advanced choirmaster and organist examinations. Between 1936 and 1938, he lived in Germany and France in order to pursue studies in composition with Paul Höffer, conducting with Clemens Krauss, and piano with Claudio Arrau. Later, he took private classes with Tor Mann in Sweden.[1]
Teaching at the Karl Wohlfarts Musikschule from 1939 to 1945, von Koch also spent the final two years of this period working as a sound expert and choirmaster for radio broadcasting. He composed much music for the Swedish film industry during a good forty years. From 1953 to 1975, he was lecturer in harmony at the Stockholm Conservatory,[2] where he was appointed a professor in 1968.[1]

von Koch became a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music in 1957. He has received numerous other honors and prizes at both national and international levels for his compositions. He has written six symphonies (of which the fifth, Lapponica, is dedicated to the Sami people),[3] twelve Scandinavian Dances, one opera (Pelle Svanslös), and five ballets, as well as music for wind orchestra.
Even in his nineties he composed/studied every day. His works can be described as uncomplicated and his motto was always to "keep the melody".[1]


At the website of the Swedish Society for Performing rights  there was supposed to be an interview.  The link is broken, but someone from the GMG forum posted it’s contents below.   



His father was composer Sigurd von Koch (1879-1919), and as a boy Erland would lie beneath the grand piano and hear Wilhelm Stenhammar and Ture Rangström play, among others. Since that time he has met many of the big names in 20th century music, including Rachmaninov, Bartók, Stravinsky, Hindemith and Alfvén.

 
Studies abroad
Although he grew up in musically rich surroundings, music was never the obvious option for Erland von Koch. It was not until his teenage years that he began playing piano and soon became interested in jazz. Together with some friends he formed the first jazz band - 'Electric Band' - at Östra Real secondary school in Stockholm, and he led the 'Diddle Kiddies' and 'Optimistic Stompers', always in dark glasses in case a teacher happened by.

 
At the end of the 1920s he won two composition contests organised by the Edda upper secondary association. His interest in music grew, and he gradually began considering a future as a composer.


Studies at the Royal Swedish Academy of Music followed, resulting in a degree in music majoring as a cantor and organist. This was followed by composition, conducting and piano studies in Berlin. The plan was to study under Hindemith, who unfortunately fell into disfavour with the Nazis and was forced to hand Erland von Koch over to his friend and colleague, Paul Höffer. He chose Claudio Arrau as his piano teacher and for conducting he studied under Clemens Krauss.


I ask him what he considers his biggest success as a composer.

"I would say my 'Liten svit för kammarorkester' (Small Suite for Chamber Orchestra), op. 1, which I debuted with - both as composer and conductor - at the Academy in 1934."


The 1930s Generation and the Monday Group
When Erland von Koch returned to Sweden in the late 1930s he was voted into the Association of Swedish Composers, FST, and he made his definitive breakthrough with 'Piano Concerto No. 1' which premiered in 1938 with the Stockholm Concert Association and pianist Herman Hoppe.

 Erland von Koch, Lars-Erik Larsson, Dag Wirén, Hilding Hallnäs and Gunnar de Frumerie all debuted in the 1930s after studying in France and Germany. They all had similar aesthetic values, and came to be known as 'Trettiotalisterna', literally 'the Generation of the 1930s'. Their music is relatively accessible and they were more influenced by Bartók, Hindemith and Honegger than by Schönberg and twelve-tone music.


The younger, radical generation which eventually made up the so-called 'Monday Group' came into opposition with the 'Trettiotalisterna', whom they considered far too traditionalistic. The Monday Group and its advocates had a strong influence on the Swedish music scene for a long time, partly because they held most of the important administrative positions. The 'Trettiotalisterna' felt left out in many respects, but the audiences appreciated their music.


Folk music and the Sami

During the 1940s, Erland von Koch became interested in Swedish folk music. Over the next decade this led to a series of works with some degree of folk musical influence, such as 'The Oxberg Variations' (1956), 'Lapland Metamorphoses' (1957) and 'Dance Rhapsody' (1957). As recently as 1990 he wrote 'Bilder från Lappland' (Images of Lapland), six choral songs based on Sami 'yoik' chants.


Personally, Erland von Koch thinks that he has been too readily and arbitrarily associated with folk music. After all, folklore is one of many elements in his style, and it is now almost fifty years since he moved on to concentrate on other styles.

This is how he describes his journey between the styles: "A tendency towards neo-classicism during the 1930s, a 'romantic' period around the mid-40s, orientation towards a more modern expression in the 1960s, and since then greater freedom encompassing all the trends and isms."

Even so, his interest in folk music and Sami chants strengthened his involvement in the Sami cause and environmental issues, which was expressed most powerfully in his symphony No. 5, 'Lapponica'. It was dedicated to the Sami people and is a kind of protest music against the way this indigenous people has been treated.

The melody is key
Erland von Koch's portfolio encompasses a large number of works in varying styles and forms. It includes 6 symphonies, 15 solo concerts, 12 'Scandinavian dances', the 'Impulsi' and 'Oxberg' trilogies for orchestra, the children's opera 'Pelle Svanlös' (Pelle - the Cat with the Very Short Tail), 5 ballets, an extensive repertoire of songs and even a few hymns.


"That's right, there's plenty on my conscience," he jokes.


He has also composed several solo works, some of the better known being those entitled '18 Monologues' - a series of skilfully executed studies of the orchestral instruments' capacity and expressive scope.

In addition - often simply to make a living, as he puts it - he has written the music for around 30 films, including half a dozen by Ingmar Bergman.

Animated rhythmic aspects - perhaps influenced by his time as a jazz pianist and by Bartók - are characteristic of Erland von Koch's music, as is the prominent role he assigns the melody. "The way I see it, the melody is the key element, the very life and soul of the music, and I have always endeavoured to cultivate its many expressive qualities," he explains.

Distinctions
Alongside his composing, Erland von Koch also worked as a harmony teacher at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm between 1953 and 1975. During the 1940s he was employed at Radiotjänst as conductor and harmony expert, and was also chairman of the Fylkingen New Music & Intermediate Art Society. He became a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music in 1957 and a professor in 1968.


Over the years he has been awarded a large number of prizes and distinctions: the Christ Johnson Prize in 1958, Vasaorden (RVO) in 1967, Litteris et artibus in 1979, the Atterberg prize in 1979 and the Alfvén prize in 1981. He was awarded the Royal Swedish Academy of Music medal for musical promotion in 2000.


Erland von Koch likes to quote Sibelius: "Don't think that the years make it any easier to compose music - it just gets harder and harder." At the same time, though, he says he is an incurable optimist:

"Above all I think that music can help us see - and even trust - the powers of good in life."




Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Latvian on November 25, 2012, 10:01:22 pm
Quote
Sten Broman (1902-1983) -  Symfoni Nº 7 par nastro electronico ed orchestra  (1972)...

I'm still not shure I should have posted this symphony. It is certainly not meant for most of us members here.

I, for one, thank you for posting this work. I've had a tape of the work for 30+ years and have never had difficulty with the work. Personally, I don't feel it's wrong to post music here that pushes the boundaries a bit. If someone doesn't like it, they're certainly not compelled to listen to it.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: kyjo on December 31, 2012, 03:55:01 pm
Thanks, Colin, for the von Koch Piano Concerto no. 2 :)

I have liked what little I have heard of von Koch's arch-conservative, folksy music and have wanted to hear more from one of the most under-recorded Swedish composers :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 10, 2013, 11:37:35 pm
Dear Dundonnel
In the first  Skold's link mediafire there is a trojan please check.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 11, 2013, 12:38:56 am
Assuming that you mean the first movement of the Skold Symphony No.3, I ran two separate anti-virus checks on the file and received no reports of any problem.

I have however deleted the link, re-uploaded the movement and provided an entirely new link. I have also checked the new upload without any report of a problem.

Please let me know if you are still having problems.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: gabriel on January 12, 2013, 11:58:19 pm
Thank you very much, Colin, for the symphonies of Skold. Do you know the orchestra(s) and conductor(s)?
Thanks again!!


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 13, 2013, 01:29:11 am
Symphony No.3(1948):

      Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra(Cecilia Rydinger Alin)

Symphony No.4(1966):

      Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra(Heinz Freudenthal)



Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: JimL on January 15, 2013, 02:54:50 pm
I've run into a bit of a quandary.  If I may refer back to the UC archive, I downloaded Erland von Koch's Musica malinconica for strings a while back.  There were four movements in the file, untitled.  In my efforts to discover the movement tempi/titles, I have come to find that the work is in only three movements (Andante tranquillo, Presto agitato, Andante sostenuto) and that the initial 9:23 minute-long slow piece at the beginning of the file is actually a completely independent work!  I have had the first page of each movement scanned and sent to me from the USC library, so there can be no mistake.  I believe jowcol uploaded that file to mediafire.  Jowcol, what is that mystery work?


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: JimL on January 17, 2013, 03:40:24 pm
If anyone has downloaded the von Koch Musica malinconica from the UC Forum, I have an alert.  The first movement is NOT the first movement!  The 9:23 long work at the beginning of the download is the Canzona for String Orchestra by the conductor of the orchestra in the performance (Öreboro Chamber Orchestra), Lennart Hedwall.  The next 3 movements constitute the entirety of the von Koch work.  Perhaps Karl Miller should be notified of this, since it was from his collection.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on January 17, 2013, 03:48:11 pm
JimL is absolutely right. I didn't download it from UC because I had it already from the radio. Now I gave it a good look and it appears that the Malinconia has three parts and after a UC download the second part sounded as my first.
Now I'm happy with my new download, because of a better sound quality

Thanks for the info

Elroel


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: jowcol on January 18, 2013, 02:41:58 pm
JimL--
Thanks for the research.  I'll see about a re-tagging of the files, and re-upload from the UC source-- however, if someone has the spare time, you have my permission (and profound thanks) if you could handle this and repost with the information.  And, as a standing offer, I would be delighted to update any movement informaiton or other details/errata you uncover for any posts I have on this site. 

wjp

I


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on January 18, 2013, 04:00:46 pm
I will

Elroel


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: JimL on January 18, 2013, 04:03:43 pm
Two works for the price of one!  ;D  And another underrepresented Swedish composer (Hedwall)!


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: kyjo on January 24, 2013, 08:12:13 pm
Manu thanks, Roberto, for the Espana Overture by Ollalo Morales, brief though it may be! He has been a composer I have been intrigued by since purchasing an enjoyable disc of his solo piano music on the Almaviva label:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51H7bhDjDrL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

He also composed a symphony which I'd love to hear!


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: JimL on January 30, 2013, 01:28:12 am
In case anybody only has this download of the Atterberg PC, the movements are:

1. Pesante allegro
2. Andante
3. Furioso


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: britishcomposer on February 02, 2013, 12:10:27 am
I have just uploaded a couple of works by Allan Pettersson.
During the 1994/95 concert season the Westdeutsche Rundfunk (WDR) organized a series of Pettersson performances in several cities of North Rhine-Westphalia. The intention was to make Pettersson's music more popular in Germany. Many concerts were broadcast live or at a later time. The technical quality is not the best; some orchestras were from small cities and you can hear that they had to struggle hard at times.
I live near Osnabrück which doesn't belong to North Rhine-Westphalia but was included due to the commitment of our then chief conductor Jean-Francois Monnard. He was a great Pettersson conductor and programmed Symphonies Nos. 5, 7 and 8 during his tenure. I guess few of you can claim to have attended live performances of THREE Pettersson symphonies! Unfortunately Monnard's No. 5 hasn't been recorded for broadcast.

An apology: Symphony No. 9 has a small gap at about 46:38 min when I had to turn the cassette.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: A.S on February 02, 2013, 02:21:55 am
I have just uploaded a couple of works by Allan Pettersson.
During the 1994/95 concert season the Westdeutsche Rundfunk (WDR) organized a series of Pettersson performances in several cities of North Rhine-Westphalia. The intention was to make Pettersson's music more popular in Germany. Many concerts were broadcast live or at a later time. The technical quality is not the best; some orchestras were from small cities and you can hear that they had to struggle hard at times.
I live near Osnabrück which doesn't belong to North Rhine-Westphalia but was included due to the commitment of our then chief conductor Jean-Francois Monnard. He was a great Pettersson conductor and programmed Symphonies Nos. 5, 7 and 8 during his tenure. I guess few of you can claim to have attended live performances of THREE Pettersson symphonies! Unfortunately Monnard's No. 5 hasn't been recorded for broadcast.

An apology: Symphony No. 9 has a small gap at about 46:38 min when I had to turn the cassette.


  I noticed them now. Many many thanks again!! :)   Atsushi


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jim on February 03, 2013, 08:09:11 pm
Many thanks for the Pettersson uploads - nice to hear a different performance Vox Humana and the 12th.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: JimL on February 07, 2013, 07:34:16 am
The download of Atterberg's Romantic Prelude to Per Svinaherde, Op. 9, doesn't download as an MP3 but as an unknown file that can't be opened by any audio program or converted by any conversion program.  As a matter of fact, it can't even be read as an audio file by my conversion programs.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Latvian on February 07, 2013, 01:18:35 pm
Quote
The download of Atterberg's Romantic Prelude to Per Svinaherde, Op. 9, doesn't download as an MP3 but as an unknown file that can't be opened by any audio program or converted by any conversion program.  As a matter of fact, it can't even be read as an audio file by my conversion programs.

Have you tried renaming the file extension before opening the program? I don't know if that's the problem here, but it's worked for me in other instances.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Holger on February 07, 2013, 01:56:21 pm
Quote
The download of Atterberg's Romantic Prelude to Per Svinaherde, Op. 9, doesn't download as an MP3 but as an unknown file that can't be opened by any audio program or converted by any conversion program.  As a matter of fact, it can't even be read as an audio file by my conversion programs.

Have you tried renaming the file extension before opening the program? I don't know if that's the problem here, but it's worked for me in other instances.

Yes, that's exactly what you have to do: just rename the file by adding an .mp3 at the end. Then everything will be OK.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: britishcomposer on February 07, 2013, 04:21:51 pm
I am sorry, I changed the dot before the mp3 ending for a comma by mistake. Now corrected!


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on February 18, 2013, 04:13:20 am
Nice to get another version of Hilding Rosenberg's Symphony No.2...only available elsewhere in an old Swedish Society Discofil recording.

We are now getting to the stage where-if one excludes my oft-mentioned British composers whose symphonies go unrecorded-Rosenberg must be the most important 20th century symphonic composer who has no integral set of the symphonies either on disc or indeed promised by any record company :( :(


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 15, 2013, 10:35:25 am
Does anyone have Von Koch Symphony no 1?


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: kyjo on July 07, 2013, 07:16:48 pm
Many thanks for the Hallnas works, Matthias :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on July 27, 2013, 04:23:34 pm
OH JOY, indeed :) :)

More Eklund symphonies :) :)

Thank you so very very much to out two German members :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: kyjo on July 27, 2013, 05:49:31 pm
OH JOY, indeed :) :)

More Eklund symphonies :) :)

Thank you so very very much to out two German members :)

Ditto :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Malito on July 27, 2013, 07:41:00 pm
 :)So glad to have more Eklund.  Why isn't he represented on disc?  This made my Saturday morning.  Thank You!  (Danke)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on July 27, 2013, 10:12:17 pm
Listening to these Eklund symphonies (which are, I freely admit it, just exactly "my cup of tea") just once again leaves me utterly astonished why music of such quality should be so totally neglected and ignored on disc :( >:(

Eklund seems to me a composer who can well stand comparison with the over-praised Allan Pettersson-who has a complete CPO cycle and a BIS cycle underway. Eklund's symphonies are within the "received tradition" and would appeal to anyone who can cope with Pettersson or BIS's pet Finn, Kalevi Aho(whose music I admire intensely, may I quickly add).

Instead of adding what I think are almost completely superfluous additions to the already recorded repertoire of well-established pieces(Dvorak symphonies, for heaven's sake ::)) or re-recording every scrap of music Sibelius ever composed(including music he discarded and was ashamed of) BIS should be giving this splendid SWEDISH composer the chance he needs.

The recording of the Symphony No.11(not necessarily Eklund's finest work) comes from Swedish Radio obviously....so maybe Eklund's time will come soon ??? The Symphony No.8 "Sinfonia grave" and the Symphony No.6 "Sinfonia senza speranza" are masterpieces.

CPO might be interested.....but it would take them ten years + to work their way through the cycle(or maybe not if they can emulate the speed at which they released their Panufnik series  ;D_ Yes...Panufnik: another composer whose music we were told by Chandos was unrecordable because "it wouldn't sell".

I know that I am a Scandinavian-music fan(or fanatic, if you prefer ;D) but this music excites me so much :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: ttle on July 28, 2013, 07:13:33 pm
Hans Eklund
1927–1999
[...]
Symphony No. 8 "Sinfonia grave" (1984)
Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra / Unknown conductor
http://www.mediafire.com/download/boa4wi3an5yrink/Eklund_Symphony_8.rar (http://www.mediafire.com/download/boa4wi3an5yrink/Eklund_Symphony_8.rar)

Many thanks to Holger once again. Just a while guess: I do not think that each of these symphonies was performed many times by the same orchestra, unfortunately, so there is some probability that this may be the recording from the world première, given on December 17, 1986 at Konserthuset in Stockholm. The conductor was Serge Baudo.

I would not endorse the statement that Pettersson is over-praised (to me, he is rather slowly being recognised as the major symphonist he is) but to the point, indeed there should be more commercial recordings of Eklund's symphonies, E. von Koch's... Incredibly, there is no commercial recording of Rosenberg's 1st or 7th (not even on LP), no modern one of his 5th, 8th, none of Hermanson's beyond the 1st, Y. Sköld's 1, 3 and 4 missing, etc. To be fair, Nordic countries are still better at defending their symphonic repertoire than many others, including France ::)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 28, 2013, 10:31:10 pm
Hans Eklund
1927–1999
[...]
Symphony No. 8 "Sinfonia grave" (1984)
Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra / Unknown conductor
http://www.mediafire.com/download/boa4wi3an5yrink/Eklund_Symphony_8.rar (http://www.mediafire.com/download/boa4wi3an5yrink/Eklund_Symphony_8.rar)

Many thanks to Holger once again. Just a while guess: I do not think that each of these symphonies was performed many times by the same orchestra, unfortunately, so there is some probability that this may be the recording from the world première, given on December 17, 1986 at Konserthuset in Stockholm. The conductor was Serge Baudo.

I would not endorse the statement that Pettersson is over-praised (to me, he is rather slowly being recognised as the major symphonist he is) but to the point, indeed there should be more commercial recordings of Eklund's symphonies, E. von Koch's... Incredibly, there is no commercial recording of Rosenberg's 1st or 7th (not even on LP), no modern one of his 5th, 8th, none of Hermanson's beyond the 1st, Y. Sköld's 1, 3 and 4 missing, etc. To be fair, Nordic countries are still better at defending their symphonic repertoire than many others, including France ::)
I have mixed emotions about Pettersson - IMHO, when he is good, he is magnificent - symphony 7, 8 and 9 and 2 in that order esp 7, are great as are his Concerti. When he is not good, he is brooding,wallowing, wailing and requires the proper mindset(to be kind). His later symphonies seem less inspired and written upon demand rather than inspiration and I have purchased them all.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 29, 2013, 06:52:38 am

Please amend my following post to exclude symphony 9, and include 6, which is a fabulous work..
The Mesto Symphonic Poem and The Symphonic Movement (usually coupled with Symphony 2) are also not to be missed.

I have mixed emotions about Pettersson - IMHO, when he is good, he is magnificent - symphony 7,8 and 9 and 2 in that order esp 7, are great as are his Concerti. When he is not good, he is brooding,wallowing, wailing and requires the proper mindset(to be kind). His later symphonies seem less inspired and written upon demand rather than inspiration and I have purchased them all.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Holger on July 29, 2013, 07:47:50 am
Great to see my Eklund uploads are that well received. I will try to get some more Eklund symphony, there should be a chance to get hold of some of the earlier ones...

ttle, you are right that in general, Scandinavian symphonism is fairly well-represented on disc (at least in comparison to other countries). The gaps you correctly point out are therefore even more striking. Eklund's music is powerful, compact and emotionally appealing. It's really stunning how consequently his symphonies have been ignored by recording companies (except No. 6, to some degree).

I also thought that Baudo might be the conductor of No. 8 (as I had a look at the sites of the Swedish MIC). Like you, I also thought that the work shouldn't have got that many performances so that the chance that it's really Baudo conducting might be fairly good. What then made me a little more careful again is that the performers of No. 7, however, do not coincide with those of the world première, in fact.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Malito on August 02, 2013, 03:55:30 am
Would love some more Eklund.  I find his music most interesting!!!! Malito


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on August 05, 2013, 07:10:11 am
Would love some more Eklund.  I find his music most interesting!!!! Malito
Check the broadcasts for Eklund, Swedish radio often carries Eklund's music..


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: dyn on November 10, 2013, 11:00:39 am
Nice to get another version of Hilding Rosenberg's Symphony No.2...only available elsewhere in an old Swedish Society Discofil recording.

We are now getting to the stage where-if one excludes my oft-mentioned British composers whose symphonies go unrecorded-Rosenberg must be the most important 20th century symphonic composer who has no integral set of the symphonies either on disc or indeed promised by any record company :( :(

Can't say this brings any better news on the recordings front, but members may be curious to note that intoclassics.net has uploaded a sizeable stash of music by Hilding Rosenberg - here (http://intoclassics.net/news/2013-11-09-33052). If you can't understand Russian or your browser doesn't automatically translate it just scroll down to the files.mail.ru link at the bottom of the page. I don't know if any of these works/performances are new to you (or whether they, in fact, originated here/at UC and are simply making their way around the internets).

I do not know much of Rosenberg's music, but do recall enjoying the 4th and 5th string quartets quite a bit, so perhaps I'll try to snag some of these.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: mjkFendrich on November 12, 2013, 09:12:45 pm
Hello Colin,

thank you for posting the 2nd VC of Erland v. Koch - unfortunately I haven't yet had any time to listen to it,
but I hope this will be a really exciting new discovery for me!


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: dyn on December 05, 2013, 04:30:21 am
Anyone happen to know the movement headings for Hilding Rosenberg's Symphonies 1, 2, 7 & 8? Thanks in advance...


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on December 05, 2013, 02:21:40 pm
Anyone happen to know the movement headings for Hilding Rosenberg's Symphonies 1, 2, 7 & 8? Thanks in advance...

Well I can tell you that the movements of the Symphony No.2 are Allegro energico; Poco adagio-Allegro assai-Poco allegro-Allegro assai; Allegro risoluto.

Unfortunately the Rosenberg Pages website seems to have disappeared so I can't help with the other three symphonies.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: britishcomposer on December 05, 2013, 04:15:07 pm
I uploaded Nos. 1 and 7 in good old UC days, both recordings from Swedish Radio P2. They didn't provide movement headings.
Sicmu uploaded No. 8 including a photograph of the LP back-cover. No movement headings were given for the Symphony, though. Sorry.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: dyn on December 09, 2013, 03:40:48 am
Thanks to both of you—I'll just label the remaining symphonies "Movement I/II/III" etc, where an obvious movement break can be found, until further information materialises.

(it helps that Nos. 7 and 8 are either in one movement, or several continuous, interrelated ones :facepalm: )

EDIT: Found the Hilding Rosenberg Pages on the Wayback Machine (http://web.archive.org/web/20100206063751/http://www.ekelin.org/). They list the movements for Symphony No 1 as Moderato, Allegretto, Allegro grazioso, Andante molto - Allegro moderato.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on December 09, 2013, 03:34:23 pm
"The Wayback Machine" :)   Now that is a useful device :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cilgwyn on December 09, 2013, 03:37:22 pm
But you can't download yourself there! :(


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: jowcol on March 04, 2014, 05:13:40 pm
Music of Hans Eklund
(http://www.gehrmans.se/MediaBinaryLoader.axd?MediaArchive_VersionID=5f7d26ef-255a-4b1b-9ef0-b9b1af5cadf2&FileName=Eklund+002.jpg%5bMaxbredd+460%5d.JPEG)


From the collection of Karl Miller.


For those of you who are looking for more Eklund- try these out!


Recordings are from radio broadcasts or personal collections.  To the best of my knowledge, none of these has been released commercially.

My thanks to Colin Mackie (aka "Dundonnell") for allowing me to include a catalog of Eklund's compositions as part of this download.


Symphony 2 "Sinfonia Breve(In Memoriam)" (1964)
Swedish Radio SO/Stig Westerberg

Symphony 3 "Sinfonia Rustica" (1967-8)
Swedish Radio SO/Stig Westerberg

Symphony 4:  “Hjalmar Brantig in Memoriam” for narrator and orchestra (1974)
Swedish Radio SO/Stig Westerberg

Symphony 5: "Quadri" (1977)
Swedish Radio SO/Stig Westerberg

Piano Concerto
Rune Jansson, piano
SWD/Sten Frykberg


From Swedish Radio-- pulled from Youtube posting.
Symphony 11 "Sinfonia Piccola" 1995


If you are interested, there is a posting of Symphony 6 (I have not included this since it is possibly commercial)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjQqyQt-aoo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjQqyQt-aoo)





Description of Eklund from Swedish Music Information Center:

Eklund's artistic temperament is made up of aggressive power and a plaintive introversion. His humour is equally obvious, but also equally ambivalent, oscillating between the exuberantly burlesque and more complicated, grotesque eruptions.

Born in Sandviken on 1st July 1927, died in Stockholm on 8th March 1999. He studied at the State Academy of Music in Stockholm 1947-1952, where he was taught by Alf Linder (organ) and Sven Brandel (piano). He studied counterpoint under Åke Uddén and composition with Lars-Erik Larsson. During these years Eklund also found time to study conducting with Tor Mann. He continued his composition studies abroad, under Ernst Pepping in Berlin. In addition to his achievement as a composer, a profession to which he has always devoted his full energies, he has acquired a reputation as a teacher. He taught the theory of music at the Stockholm Citizens’ School 1961-1967, and in 1964 he joined the staff of the State Academy of Music in Stockholm, where he taught harmony and counterpoint. Between 1954 and 1956 Eklund received a Composer's Scholarship from the Swedish Government.

Technically speaking, Eklund predominantly employs a distinct, simple rhythm and a sophisticated treatment of melody. He aims for independent clarity in the individual parts and also at fullness of substance in the polyphonic contrapuntal movements. His musical imagination is convincing, both in his unashamedly cheerful pieces and on occasions when he carefully builds up his music into larger forms; on these latter occasions he can achieve a profound gravity which compels one to regard him as a “confessing artist“ of inner necessity.

Hans-Gunnar Peterson
Source: STIM / Swedish Music Information Centre

Description from Requiem Survey.org.
Hans Eklund, (01/07/1927 - 08/03/1999), a Swedish composer and teacher, born in Sandviken. After attending the Stockholm Musikhögskolan (1947- 52) he studied composition with Larsson and with Pepping in Berlin (1953-4); and in 1957 he studied opera in Rome. In 1964 he was appointed to teach counterpoint and harmony at the Stockholm Musikhögskolan. Most of his compositions are instrumental and are marked by a solid technique developed principally from Hindemith and Reger; the concertante Musica da camera pieces are modelled after Hindemith’s Kammermusik series. Musik för Orkester which marked a turning- point in his career, was followed by four symphonies, the second of which was a bitter reaction to hypocrisy. The third was suggested by the landscape and folk music of Gotland. He has never been interested in electronical music.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 05, 2014, 02:49:07 am
Profound thanks to Karl Miller for supplying these Eklund recordings and to John (jowcol) for uploading them for us :) :)

Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

This will provide a wonderful opportunity to sample more of the music of a composer unaccountably ignored by commercial recording companies ::) Eklund is, apparently, of no interest to Robert von Bahr and BIS :(

(With the You Tube additions of more previously unheard British music today has been like Christmas-time, unwrapping musical presents :))


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 05, 2014, 05:48:08 am
Profound thanks to Karl Miller for supplying these Eklund recordings and to John (jowcol) for uploading them for us :) :)

Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

This will provide a wonderful opportunity to sample more of the music of a composer unaccountably ignored by commercial recording companies ::) Eklund is, apparently, of no interest to Robert von Bahr and BIS :(

(With the You Tube additions of more previously unheard British music today has been like Christmas-time, unwrapping musical presents :))

Yes, this is qute extraordinary and most welcome!!


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Latvian on March 05, 2014, 01:55:08 pm
Quote from: Latvian on July 11, 2013, 06:15:03 pm
Quote
Lars-Erik Larsson (1908-1986)

Cello Concerto, Op. 37 (1946-47)
    in three movements, details unknown

  Guido Vecchi, cello
  Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra
  Stig Westerberg, conductor

http://www.mediafire.com/folder/ytvcdtppt135n/Larsson

from a Swedish Radio archival broadcast, never issued commercially to the best of my knowledge.
Thanks so much for providing this, can we assume the file is not the violin or viola concerto(it is named vc)

Yes. "Vc" is a standard abbreviation for violoncello. If it were violin I would have used "vn," and if it were viola I would have used "va."


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Latvian on March 05, 2014, 01:58:31 pm
Quote
Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

I believe he wrote thirteen symphonies, in which case we're also lacking Nos. 12 & 13.

However, I'm with you, Colin -- thrilled to have all the others! Not so long ago, the only work of Eklund's I knew was the 6th Symphony, from the Swedish Discofil LP (and later CD). Never in my wildest imaginings did I think I would ever hear so many other works of Eklund's.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 05, 2014, 09:47:19 pm
Assuming that you mean the first movement of the Skold Symphony No.3, I ran two separate anti-virus checks on the file and received no reports of any problem.

I have however deleted the link, re-uploaded the movement and provided an entirely new link. I have also checked the new upload without any report of a problem.

Please let me know if you are still having problems.
sometimes viruses advertising adobe flash will suddenly appear on some web pages,I suspect they sometimes might be on the users computer.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 06, 2014, 02:18:42 am
Quote
Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

I believe he wrote thirteen symphonies, in which case we're also lacking Nos. 12 & 13.

However, I'm with you, Colin -- thrilled to have all the others! Not so long ago, the only work of Eklund's I knew was the 6th Symphony, from the Swedish Discofil LP (and later CD). Never in my wildest imaginings did I think I would ever hear so many other works of Eklund's.

Maybe sometimes I should check my own catalogues before making inaccurate pronouncements :-[ :-[

You are quite correct :) As my online catalogue tells me there are the two late Symphonies-No. 12 "Frescoes" and No.13 "Sinfonia Bianca-Negra".


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 07, 2014, 12:38:33 am
With reference to the recent Hans Eklund uploads, I can find no mention of a Piano Concerto amongst Eklund's works. There is however a work entitled "Musica da Camera IV" for Piano and Chamber Orchestra.

Given that the work we have been given is only ten minutes in duration and sounds very much as if it is scored for a chamber orchestra I guess that this is the piece we now have.

The other point I would make is that the Symphony No.4 "Hjalmar Brantig In Memoriam" at 27 minutes in length is considerably longer than the time quoted in my catalogue which was supplied with the Eklund downloads.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Gauk on March 07, 2014, 03:01:27 pm
The other point I would make is that the Symphony No.4 "Hjalmar Brantig In Memoriam" at 27 minutes in length is considerably longer than the time quoted in my catalogue which was supplied with the Eklund downloads.

That piece is a terrible artistic misjudgement. What I assume are recordings of speeches by Branting, separated by bits of music, do not make a symphony. However strongly Eklund felt about Branting, a purely musical memorial would have been a more fitting tribute to the man - and might have received a wider circulation.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 07, 2014, 06:28:08 pm
Yes...it is, Hjalmar Branting (not Brantig)-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hjalmar_Branting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hjalmar_Branting)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 12, 2014, 03:38:16 am
Huge thanks to Sicmu for the Moses Pergament Jewish Song Symphony-his magnum opus-which I have been hoping for a very long time to get to hear :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 12, 2014, 01:15:03 pm
Huge thanks to Sicmu for the Moses Pergament Jewish Song Symphony-his magnum opus-which I have been hoping for a very long time to get to hear :)

Yes indeed - it's on as I write; quite something thus far ! Thank you so much.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Sicmu on March 12, 2014, 03:09:15 pm
I agree it is a masterpiece, shame on the record companies that didn't make this "symphony" available on CD.

Regarding Eklund 6 on Youtube, it is actually my transfer I posted years ago on the forum (possibly UC) : it is funny to see the music coming back to the place it started and I wouldn't be surprised the Pergament follows the same path (as many of my posts).


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 12, 2014, 04:02:16 pm
I posted this on another music forum two years ago:

Now here is a strange situation.

In the chapter on "Modern Music in Scandinavia" written by Bo Wallner and included in "European Music in the Twentieth Century"(rev. edition 1961; edited by Howard Hartog) Moses Pergament is grouped with his contemporaries Hilding Rosenberg(born 1892) and Gosta Nystroem(born 1890) as one of the central figures of Swedish music.

Yet Pergament was always an outsider. Born in Finland(then part of the Russian Empire) and a Jew, Pergament was never fully accepted within his adopted country of Sweden. He came in for systematic attack both by Peterson-Berger and Kurt Atterberg who denied him entry to the Swedish Society of Composers for many years on the spurious grounds that Pergament wasn't Swedish (despite the protests of Hilding Rosenberg on Pergament's behalf). In fact Pergament had grown up in Finland speaking Swedish and the hostility towards him, at least from Peterson-Berger, was clearly anti-Semitic.


Yet today Pergament has completely disappeared. His music is never heard. None of his concertos is on cd nor his magnum opus- the 1944 Choral Symphony. I had seen his name over the last 40 + years and never really enquired before into his ouput.

Pergament's Choral Symphony is "The Jewish Song" and is scored for soprano, tenor, chorus and orchestra and is over an hour and a half long. It was recorded by Caprice to Lp but has never been transferred to cd. There are concertos for Violin(1948), Piano No.1(1951-52), Two Violins and Chamber Orchestra(1954), Cello(1954-55), Viola(1964-65) and Piano No.2(1974-75).

Allan Pettersson-who barely rates a mention in the reference books of thirty years ago or so-has all his orchestral music recorded once(by cpo) and now probably twice(by Bis) but Pergament disappears into oblivion.

How fickle is the hand of musical fate




Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 12, 2014, 10:11:43 pm
Wonderful.......we now have the Moses Pergament Piano Concerto No.1 and Cello Concerto :)

Thanks to shamus :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 12, 2014, 11:07:44 pm
I posted this on another music forum two years ago:

Now here is a strange situation.

In the chapter on "Modern Music in Scandinavia" written by Bo Wallner and included in "European Music in the Twentieth Century"(rev. edition 1961; edited by Howard Hartog) Moses Pergament is grouped with his contemporaries Hilding Rosenberg(born 1892) and Gosta Nystroem(born 1890) as one of the central figures of Swedish music.

Yet Pergament was always an outsider. Born in Finland(then part of the Russian Empire) and a Jew, Pergament was never fully accepted within his adopted country of Sweden. He came in for systematic attack both by Peterson-Berger and Kurt Atterberg who denied him entry to the Swedish Society of Composers for many years on the spurious grounds that Pergament wasn't Swedish (despite the protests of Hilding Rosenberg on Pergament's behalf). In fact Pergament had grown up in Finland speaking Swedish and the hostility towards him, at least from Peterson-Berger, was clearly anti-Semitic.


Yet today Pergament has completely disappeared. His music is never heard. None of his concertos is on cd nor his magnum opus- the 1944 Choral Symphony. I had seen his name over the last 40 + years and never really enquired before into his ouput.

Pergament's Choral Symphony is "The Jewish Song" and is scored for soprano, tenor, chorus and orchestra and is over an hour and a half long. It was recorded by Caprice to Lp but has never been transferred to cd. There are concertos for Violin(1948), Piano No.1(1951-52), Two Violins and Chamber Orchestra(1954), Cello(1954-55), Viola(1964-65) and Piano No.2(1974-75).

Allan Pettersson-who barely rates a mention in the reference books of thirty years ago or so-has all his orchestral music recorded once(by cpo) and now probably twice(by Bis) but Pergament disappears into oblivion.

How fickle is the hand of musical fate




Swedish radio sometimes features his music which I am quite impressed with.  I have passed a few things o to members as Coming Broadcasts but some links may now be expired.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: jowcol on March 13, 2014, 12:45:07 am
Music of Torbjorn Lundquist
(http://accordeonworld.weebly.com/uploads/1/8/7/3/18731590/1765206.jpg?144)

From the collection of Karl Miller

An interesting composer without enough recognition-- I like the dark noir touches in the end of the third symphony, and he's also quite the composer for the accordion, like Piazzolla.


Symphony 2 "For Freedom":
Swedish Radio SO/Stig Westerberg


Symphony 4 "Sinfonia Ecologica":
Goteborg SO/Sixten Ehrling



Additional Lunquist works from Youtube:


Symfoni nr 3, Sinfonia dolorosa (1975)
Kungliga filharmonikerna, Stockholm,Peter Maag.
Source LP: Artemis ART 50-104.  LP cover reproduced below.
(http://www.audiophileusa.com/covers400water/105012.jpg)
From Youtube (posted by Robt0007)

Duell: Duet for percussion and Accordion
Van Burka-percussion, Dragan Mirkovic-accordion (Gallery of Matica srpska, Novi Sad-Serbia, February the 7th, 2007.)
Posted on Youtube  by Dragan Mirkovic

Bewegun: For Accordian and String Quartet
Peformed by the Fandango Band
Maxim Fedorov, bayan (Accordian)
Ivan Subbotkin violine
Simeon Denisov, violine
Artem Valentinov, viola
Vasily Ratkin, cello

Posted on Youtube by Simon Denisov







Blurb from eClassical.com:

Swedish composer Torbjörn Iwan Lundquist (1920-2000). Lundquist represents to a far greater extent than his predecessors Cowell and Cage the traditional view of percussive instruments as a source of sound expressive of power, hardness and incisiveness. He blended the great European orchestral tradition with neomodernism and jazz.Conductor and artistic director at the Drottningholm Caste Theatre between 1949 and 1956. Hugo Alfvén Prize 1992.

Bio from AccordeonWorld:
Lundquist Torbjörn Iwan (1920 - 2000)

Torbjörn Lundquist was born in Stockholm on 30th of September 1920. He was a Swedish composer, conductor and musicologist.

After military service in 1945, he studied musicology at the University of Uppsala, with Issai Dobrowen, and composition with Dag Wirén. In Salzburg and Vienna he studied conducting with Otmar Suitner.

In 1947 he founded his own chamber orchestra, which he also conducted. From 1949 till 1956 he was conductor with the orchestra of the Royal Theatre Drotteningholm. Since that time he was guest conductor with orchestras in Sweden and throughout Europe.
From 1963 till 1971 Lundquist was member of the administrationof the Swedish Federation of Composers. From 1969 till 1971 he was their second practitioner.

In 1956 his symphony no 1 was premiered, but it was followed by a period of experimentation and studies in different styles, genres and traditions. From 1970 Lundquist decided to stop composing symphonical works. Only the financial support of the Swedish government allowed him to restart composing symphonical music.
His Symphony no 3, Sinfonie Dolorosa, was a pioneering work. His relationship with nature is shown in Symphony no 4, Sinfonia Ecologica and also in Symphony no 6, Sarek.

Lundquist used different forms of expression and style in order to reach the synthesis he was looking for: traditional music, modern avant-garde and jazz elements are confrontated with each other. The various elements merge together into a personal and rich palette, that the composer refined to a strong expression over the years.

The works of Torbjörn Lundquist reflect a strong acceptance of life and love for freedom, with feelings that range from thoughtful sincerity to great eruptions. Lundquist lived close to nature, but also close to what happened in the outside world. He was looking for the key of living, not to escape reality, but for being able to recover.

In 1989 he was rewarded the Atterberg Prize for his engaged musical works. In 1992 he got the Hugo Alfvenprize.

From the Swedish Music Information Center:

Torbjörn Iwan Lundquist
Born in Stockholm on the 30th September, 1920, died in Grillby on the 1st July 2000. After school and military service he went to Uppsala University in 1945 to study musicology. At the same time he studied composition with Dag Wirén and, during the 70s, conducting with Otmar Suitner in Salzburg and Vienna. In 1947 Lundquist founded a chamber orchestra of his own, which led to his appointment as conductor and artistic director of the Drottningholm Court Theatre from 1949 to 1956. He also appeared as guest conductor with symphony orchestras in Sweden and Europe.

The years as a symphonist, from the first symphony in 1956 and particularly since 1970, have not excluded works in other genres: songs, music for percussion, concertos, chamber music, choral works and two operas. Symphony No. 3, “Sinfonia Dolorosa“, was Lundquist’s breakthrough as a symphonist. He often emphasised the importance of nature and its imprint is noticeable in Symphony No. 4, “Sinfonia Ecologica“ and Symphony No. 6, “Sarek“. His strong commitment to universal issues is also evident in Symphony No. 2 “... for freedom“, Symphony No. 7, “Humanity“, dedicated to the memory of Dag Hammarskjöld, and Symphony No. 9, “Survival“. The subtitles of the symphonies – which should not be interpreted programmatically but only as an indication of a basic idea or source of inspiration – give us a hint of Lundquist’s manifestations of will.

Lundquist made use of many different expressive and stylistic means in his compositional technique in order to achieve the synthesis he was aiming for, which juxtaposes traditionally constructed music, modern avant-garde elements and jazz-influenced outbreaks. Although the composer himself emphasised influences from other cultures – the Indonesian gamelan orchestras with their distinctive percussion sounds, for example, and the Saami vuolle (often wrongly called “yoik“) – his symphonies are essentially a part of the European orchestral tradition. The different elements blend together to form a personal, rich palette which the composer refined over the years to suit his strong need to express himself. His works reflect a profound obsession with life and a passionate desire for freedom. He expresses emotions that range from meditative serenity to violent eruptions in a musical language that is basically tonal.

He lived close to nature, but was also keenly aware of the world around him. In times of rapid change and environmental pollution, Torbjörn Iwan Lundquist was trying to find life’s innermost core, “not to flee from reality, but to restore it". In 1989 he was awarded STIM’s (Swedish Performing Rights Society) Atterberg Prize and the motive of the jury mentioned his “absorbing and unpretentious musical art with its profound humanistic spirit.“ He was awarded the Hugo Alfvén Prize in 1992 for his "rich compositional achievements founded on idealism and naturalistic lyricism”.
Tony Lundman (rev. 2001)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 13, 2014, 02:59:25 am
Once again (how many times does one say it ???)......many, many thanks for two more Swedish symphonies-the Lundqvust Nos. 2 and 4 :) :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 14, 2014, 07:26:04 am
This may be of interest to some members who like Hans Eklund's music.
https://app.audiogon.com/listings/classical-caprice-crusell-sinfonia-concertante-atterberg-horn-concerto-hans-eklund-horn-conc-2014-01-13-music-33971


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 14, 2014, 11:15:42 am
I have been posting links to some live concerts from Swedish radio for some time and some of them have been that of
Hans Eklund. Not sure how many have been passed on to these archives, but I have some concerts as well as some other modern Swedes like Moses Pergament and others if anyone has an interest in uploading them. Please check the broacasts at that topic for non-commercial postings.

I also have this which originally came from Karl Miller's collection although there was a question regarding the existence of a Eklund piano concerto.

Eklund,Hans - Piano Concerto
Rune Jansson(piano) SWD Orchestra,Sten Frykberg
from the colection of Karl Miller


I have Eklund 1 from Swedish radio recorded live but lack documentation and knowledge of commercial availability.

Unlke the other pieces I have, it lacks audience applause at the end, but I know many would like to hear it. If someone could
confirm the non-commercial status I would gladly pass it on.


Eklund,Hans - Symphony No.1  Sinfonia Seria(1958)
Stockholm PO,Thomas Schuback

Eklund,Hans - Musica da camera, Art Tatum in memoriam (1956).
Göran Åkestedt, trumpet, Leif Asp, piano och Anders Soldén, slagverk.
Radioorkestern. Dirigent Sten Frykberg. Inspelat 1958
Swedish Radio P2 broadcast
httpsverigesradio.sesidaavsni tt268439programid=4428

Eklund,Hans (1927-99) - Symphony No.3 Sinfonia Rustica (1967-68)
Sveriges Radios Symfoniorkester,Stig Westerberg, cond. (rec. 1969)
(a much higher quakity than what has been posted)


 


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 14, 2014, 11:21:26 am
Thanks to Sicmu for posting Pergament's "Den judiska Sången".

The work, possibly the top of Pergament's compositions, stood on my wishlist for a long time.




Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 14, 2014, 05:16:21 pm
Thanks to Sicmu for posting Pergament's "Den judiska Sången".

The work, possibly the top of Pergament's compositions, stood on my wishlist for a long time.



Yes, much appreciated, thanks !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 16, 2014, 08:48:13 am
http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,3538.0.html

Hans Eklund Music for Orchestra on Swedish radio


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 16, 2014, 08:45:16 pm
When I downloaded the files of Eklund, Börtz, Boldeman and Nilsson, so,ething went wrong writing the medaifire address to the post.I corrected this by re-writing it twicw. Hopefully the links are o.k.

Sorry Jolly Roger, I overlooked your message on Hans Eklund's Musik för Orkester.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: gabriel on March 16, 2014, 10:46:50 pm
Many thanks to Elroel for his uploads of Swedish symphonic works... and for using a lossless format!! Maybe, in the future, it will be standard in our dear Forum.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 16, 2014, 11:54:44 pm
When I downloaded the files of Eklund, Börtz, Boldeman and Nilsson, so,ething went wrong writing the medaifire address to the post.I corrected this by re-writing it twicw. Hopefully the links are o.k.

Sorry Jolly Roger, I overlooked your message on Hans Eklund's Musik för Orkester.

apparently you have seen it..thanks for watching the broadcast links


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 17, 2014, 01:05:57 am
Hi guys,

One  of the members complained about the lenght of the files in my latest Swedish posts, what gave him, with a slow and unstable internet connection, troubles by downloading.
In have four of the files made into mp3 (192kbs) files and placed them in my original post.
Hope it helps.



Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 17, 2014, 05:57:41 pm
Quote from: shamus on March 12, 2014, 08:04:51 pm
http://www.sendspace.com/filegroup/4FD5eY2eOalIs9M7DX7DpA

'Here you will find Pergament's piano and cello concertos. The Cello Concerto is definitely from a concert with applause, however, I couldn't tell who the performers were, and the Piano Concerto may not be admissible--not sure if it's a concert or not. I searched the web for the piece, the pianist, any recording, etc. and came up with nothing, so if anyone feels it should be removed, just let me know and I will do so.'

OK - anyone able to provide a little 'safety' assistance ? Sendspace offers no less than 5 buttons to click saying download - any ideas which one might actually give access to the music, as opposed to lumping you with some tripe you don't want  & are then expected to pay for - or a virus/spyware etc..
Sorry, don't wish to appear ungrateful, just profoundly mistrustful of sites such as this...best answer, of course - ignore the suggestion to download at all; that rather defeats the object of Mr. Shamus' kind efforts, however !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 17, 2014, 06:00:54 pm
Hi guys,

One  of the members complained about the lenght of the files in my latest Swedish posts, what gave him, with a slow and unstable internet connection, troubles by downloading.
In have four of the files made into mp3 (192kbs) files and placed them in my original post.
Hope it helps.



Lovely music, Mr. Roelof. Many thanks !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 17, 2014, 06:18:39 pm
Quote from: shamus on March 12, 2014, 08:04:51 pm
http://www.sendspace.com/filegroup/4FD5eY2eOalIs9M7DX7DpA

'Here you will find Pergament's piano and cello concertos. The Cello Concerto is definitely from a concert with applause, however, I couldn't tell who the performers were, and the Piano Concerto may not be admissible--not sure if it's a concert or not. I searched the web for the piece, the pianist, any recording, etc. and came up with nothing, so if anyone feels it should be removed, just let me know and I will do so.'

OK - anyone able to provide a little 'safety' assistance ? Sendspace offers no less than 5 buttons to click saying download - any ideas which one might actually give access to the music, as opposed to lumping you with some tripe you don't want  & are then expected to pay for - or a virus/spyware etc..
Sorry, don't wish to appear ungrateful, just profoundly mistrustful of sites such as this...best answer, of course - ignore the suggestion to download at all; that rather defeats the object of Mr. Shamus' kind efforts, however !

Click on the file name, ie the underlined web address http etc etc. That takes you to another page, from which you click on "click here to download from sendspace".

That should work.....it did for me :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: shamus on March 17, 2014, 07:50:45 pm
Sorry, reuploaded using mediafire the Pergament pf cto and cello cto.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Malito on March 17, 2014, 08:03:15 pm
Jolly Roger:

Thanks so much for all the Swedish music lately.  I love the music of Hans Eklund---what a pity that he is not better-known!  I also enjoyed the symphony no. 2 of Anders Nilsson.  Alas, nothing happens when I try to download his Violin Concerto.  Could you check into that?  I so appreciate all the music I get here...when you're retired as I am and have little to do, this is an excellent and exiting addition to an otherwise mediocre life.  Thank you again!  Malito


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 17, 2014, 08:52:24 pm
Sorry, reuploaded using mediafire the Pergament pf cto and cello cto.

Terrific - thank you !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 17, 2014, 08:55:59 pm
Quote from: shamus on March 12, 2014, 08:04:51 pm
http://www.sendspace.com/filegroup/4FD5eY2eOalIs9M7DX7DpA

'Here you will find Pergament's piano and cello concertos. The Cello Concerto is definitely from a concert with applause, however, I couldn't tell who the performers were, and the Piano Concerto may not be admissible--not sure if it's a concert or not. I searched the web for the piece, the pianist, any recording, etc. and came up with nothing, so if anyone feels it should be removed, just let me know and I will do so.'

OK - anyone able to provide a little 'safety' assistance ? Sendspace offers no less than 5 buttons to click saying download - any ideas which one might actually give access to the music, as opposed to lumping you with some tripe you don't want  & are then expected to pay for - or a virus/spyware etc..
Sorry, don't wish to appear ungrateful, just profoundly mistrustful of sites such as this...best answer, of course - ignore the suggestion to download at all; that rather defeats the object of Mr. Shamus' kind efforts, however !

Click on the file name, ie the underlined web address http etc etc. That takes you to another page, from which you click on "click here to download from sendspace".

That should work.....it did for me :)

Thank you, Mr. D.;the problem's been resolved for us kindly. Will try to remember if there's a 'next time' !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 17, 2014, 11:09:24 pm
Hi Malito,

I'll re-upload the concerto  Nilsson Violin Concerto. Don't know what happened though. When I uploaded it, I could download it also.

BTW, if you (like me) are retired, and you wish to keep a lot of free to use hours: DON'T GO TO THIS FORUM. IT'LL COST YOU YOUR TIME.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 17, 2014, 11:32:46 pm
Anders Nilsson: Violin Concerto

I re-uploaded the mp3 file.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Malito on March 18, 2014, 12:18:51 am
Thanks,  Elroel!

I need to fill up my time.  This works so well.  Better than watching TV.  Still could not get the VC of Nilsson to download...I'll keep looking for it.  All I have is the same listing as before.

Malito


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 18, 2014, 01:59:42 am
The link to the Nilsson Violin Concerto still does not work. When I click on the link I am getting a "problem loading page" screen. The other links work perfectly.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Gauk on March 18, 2014, 08:45:43 am
That Nilsson symphony is well worth hearing - an exciting, dramatic piece.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 18, 2014, 10:39:49 am
About the Anders Nilsson downloads: Symphony 2 & Violin Concerto

I don't know what's happening there. When I modified my post, I gave the mp3 files a new link, they were, after saving not visible in the post.
When looking at the original posts, I saw that the links were double in length. (Two times the link).
I don't know why. I removed the mp3's on the bottom of the post, and gave the works a new link.

After giving the files a new link, I started downloading to myself. They came down o.k.






Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 18, 2014, 02:13:46 pm

I need to fill up my time.  This works so well.  Better than watching TV.  Still could not get the VC of Nilsson to download...I'll keep looking for it.  All I have is the same listing as before.

Malito
Have you tried it again? Did it work this time?

Fully agreed about Television. Well, use your time here, but don't tell me I did not warn you :D


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 18, 2014, 04:24:44 pm
The link to the Nilsson Violin Concerto works perfectly now :)

....and it sounds a most impressive piece :)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: jowcol on March 18, 2014, 05:30:02 pm
Gunnar Bucht: Symphony No. 8
(http://www.gunnarbucht.com/index4.jpg)
From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony No. 8 ((1983)
Stockholm Philharmonic/Yuri Aronovitch
Possibly premeire?
Radio Broadcast.


Material from gunnarbucht.com:

Machine translation of Bucht's Commentary on Symphony 8:
Symphony No. 8 (1983)

World premiere: 13/9, 1984, the Stockholm Concert Hall. Starring: StockholmPhilharmonic under the direction of Yuri Ahronovitch. Concert replay 15/9 1984.

 More talent: 11/11/1987, the Stockholm Concert Hall. Participants:Stockholm Philharmonic conducted by Alexander Gibson. 17/11/1988

Malmö Concert Hall. Starring: Malmö Symphony Orchestra under the direction ofBrian Priestman. 2/4 in 1993, the Royal College of music in Stockholm.
Participants:
Music School Orchestra, conducted by Michel Tabachnik as a tribute
at my resignation as practitioner. Concert Replay 3/4 1993 in the artist, the Music Academy in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Durata: 27 min

Comment: the work has four movements, of which the first two are played attacca.Satsföljden slow-Tempo is very fast-moderate — slow and
Symphony opening sets the tone for the future: the oboe stämmton spawn
on other instruments which collects in the brightest major. The entire first movement characterised by the interplay between different durtonaliteter like towards the end from sliding into each other.
In the second movement is clouded this game without having to completely disappear in the third movement
oförmedlar set against each other in layer composition, however, in a different way than in
Sinfonia concertante (see above). The fourth and final movement is dominated by two ideas:
a "creeping" movements in solo strings, one with a big "ihopsjunkande"
glissando in the entire string orchestra. These ideas at the same time, two very different flashes
minor tonality and eventually assume each other's moves, s.a.s. swapped. Symphony
ends with a recollection from the beginning of time.

Reception: the Symphony was received with great warmth and they talked about a new, more
lyrical tone in my music. Later, however, the critical views expressed in the
It pointed out that, in the process, indicating fugitive something you considered conflict
against the Symphonic idea. Myself, I work for one of my principal and
This is for several reasons: that indicating is, in my opinion, a force which
Symphonic thinking can be so much. Again, the actual musical language appeals to me
very not least because it shows the opportunities in totalkromatiken
What is my starting point. Finally: last movement I
dare the word – is a masterstroke in his basic pulse of the piece with
increasingly extended drama. In addition, occurred at the first performance it rare to
I'm at a moment was totally surprised by what I heard: "I really
heard and written this? "I asked myself. It was as though a gap in life
opened up and showed the possibility of another world. Such an experience is difficult
to restrain and manage but also hard to forget.

Bio
Gunnar Bucht was born in Stocksund (near Stockholm) in 1927. He studied musicology at Uppsala University (Licenciate of Philosophy, 1953) and composition with Karl-Birger Blomdahl between 1947 and 1951. Subsequent teachers included Carl Orff, Goffredo Petrassi and (perhaps the most important of all) Max Deutsch. Bucht made his début as a pianist in 1949 but later came to specialise exclusively in composition.

From 1963 he taught musicology, among other things, at Stockholm University. Professor of composition at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm from 1975 to 1985 and Director at the same institution from 1987 to 1993. Numerous administrative appointments: chairman of the concert organization Fylkingen 1956-59, active in the Swedish section and the International Presidium of the ISCM 1960-1972, chairman of the Society of Swedish Composers 1963-69, Swedish cultural attaché in Bonn 1970-73.

Elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music in 1964. The royal medal "Litteris et Artibus" 1987. At present living and working as composer and author on the island of Gotland and in Stockholm.

Bucht on Bucht:

Paraphrasing the French 18th-century philosopher, my own artistic motto could be read as 'Tradition, what do you want from me? Live up to me - if you can!' This means: my relationship to tradition is dialogical; tradition is seen as challenge, not as a pillow. This outlook is reflected in my double activities as a composer and musicologist. The historical and analytical perspectives are always present in my creative work. At the same time, when teaching music history and analysis the artistic dimension is always there, I hope. I teach not only facts but also experiences.


The tension between emotionality and intellectuality is reflected in the often dramatic character of my music. Theres is an affinity with Berlioz' "l'imprévu", the unexpected, as a formal principle. In my music, the architecture is nearly bursting from within and at the same time is being kept on a tight rein. Maliciously, my music could be characterized as a composition of intensely dramatic and poetic moments on one side and road-consuming sections on the other.


Orchestral works dominates my output, much of it of long duration. It satisfies my need for emotional expansion and narration. Since the 1970s, the titles reveal a lot about the contents. Reading them you could reformulate my artistic belief as follows: I believe in an absolute music permeated with extramusical ideas of the world, with echoes of history, with inner pictures and visions, with wordless drama.

GUNNAR BUCHT




Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Malito on March 18, 2014, 08:03:02 pm
Elroel:

Thank you...I finally got it to work and the Nilsson is a wonderful concerto!

Malito


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 18, 2014, 09:24:24 pm
The post with the works by Eklund, Börtz, Nilsson and Boldeman is removed now.
I will make a new entry after I find out what the f... (pardon me) is happening to that post.
Again when I opened the post there were very strange things going on. (Some url's were not, and other partly visible; while other parts of text were acting as 'url'.

I'll run a complete virus check on my machines, to be certain that that is not the problem here. 
I'll delete the files at Mediafire and re-upload them later on.

Sorry for the trouble.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 19, 2014, 02:00:41 am
Jolly Roger:

Thanks so much for all the Swedish music lately.  I love the music of Hans Eklund---what a pity that he is not better-known!  I also enjoyed the symphony no. 2 of Anders Nilsson.  Alas, nothing happens when I try to download his Violin Concerto.  Could you check into that?  I so appreciate all the music I get here...when you're retired as I am and have little to do, this is an excellent and exiting addition to an otherwise mediocre life.  Thank you again!  Malito
Thanks for the encouragement, I have posted some Nilsson, but I don't think I posted that particular piece at the broadcasts, at least I could not locate it.
But if I did, please send me the link to my message post and I will correct it.
Also please be advised that some older postings will be put of date and made inactive at Swedish Radio..
I think Elroel posted the NilssonVC download link in the Swedish download thread.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 22, 2014, 05:20:50 pm
Mr. Roelof - trying manfully to keep up with your latest batch of excellent uploads; bit confused by the Britta Bystrom, which seems to come up as something completely different on Mediafire. Is that just me ? Probably !
                                                                                                Great if you could have a look. Thanks !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 22, 2014, 08:19:08 pm
Re: Britta Bystrom - Viola Concerto.

No, Mr. Clive, it's not you. After your message I tried to listen to the file on Mediafire. Result: beautiful silence.
I deleted the mp3 file and am now uploading the .wav file in stead.

55% is uploaded so far, so in a about 8 minutes the file will be downloadable from Mediafire. (In original post).


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 23, 2014, 07:49:09 pm
Got it now, thanks, Mr. R. ! Much appreciated, as always.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 23, 2014, 10:01:05 pm
Re: Britta Bystrom - Viola Concerto.

No, Mr. Clive, it's not you. After your message I tried to listen to the file on Mediafire. Result: beautiful silence.
I deleted the mp3 file and am now uploading the .wav file in stead.

55% is uploaded so far, so in a about 8 minutes the file will be downloadable from Mediafire. (In original post).

Regarding Bystrom, I have never been able embrace much of her music and I have listened to much
of it on Swedish radio, who seem to be pushing her product to the neglect of more important others. In my feeble brain, there
is just something about it, it sounds almost "manufactured". But I can see where some might like it..
Am I missing something here? Any feedback would be welcome..


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 24, 2014, 10:26:05 am
To be honest, I listened to Bystrom's Violakonsert only two times. It intrigued me how she managed to create a concerto after a pretty strange start of the work. Now listening to it, I must say I can see what Jolly Roger feels about being 'manufactured'. So far it didn't irritate me. Her other works gave me mixed feelings so far.

I wonder what you think about another Swedish lady composer, who I discovered recently: Andrea Tapponi
She was born in 1981.

On her website are a few works you can download, and be able to listen to parts of other works

www.andreatarrodi.com

Her work for orchestra 'Liguria' impressed me. Another interesting work for me is 'Empireo'


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 24, 2014, 11:03:44 am
To be honest, I listened to Bystrom's Violakonsert only two times. It intrigued me how she managed to create a concerto after a pretty strange start of the work. Now listening to it, I must say I can see what Jolly Roger feels about being 'manufactured'. So far it didn't irritate me. Her other works gave me mixed feelings so far.

I wonder what you think about another Swedish lady composer, who I discovered recently: Andrea Tapponi
She was born in 1981.

On her website are a few works you can download, and be able to listen to parts of other works

www.andreatarrodi.com

Her work for orchestra 'Liguria' impressed me. Another interesting work for me is 'Empireo'
Not to be patronizing, Sweden and Scandinavia have some fine woman composers, thanks for the tip om Tapponi, I'll check it out


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: britishcomposer on March 24, 2014, 03:39:36 pm
To be honest, I listened to Bystrom's Violakonsert only two times. It intrigued me how she managed to create a concerto after a pretty strange start of the work. Now listening to it, I must say I can see what Jolly Roger feels about being 'manufactured'. So far it didn't irritate me. Her other works gave me mixed feelings so far.

I wonder what you think about another Swedish lady composer, who I discovered recently: Andrea Tapponi
She was born in 1981.

On her website are a few works you can download, and be able to listen to parts of other works

www.andreatarrodi.com

Her work for orchestra 'Liguria' impressed me. Another interesting work for me is 'Empireo'
Not to be patronizing, Sweden and Scandinavia have some fine woman composers, thanks for the tip om Tapponi, I'll check it out

Not to be patronizing, but her name is spelled Tarrodi as the link shows. ;)


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 24, 2014, 04:19:36 pm

I wonder what you think about another Swedish lady composer, who I discovered recently: Andrea Tapponi
She was born in 1981.

On her website are a few works you can download, and be able to listen to parts of other works

www.andreatarrodi.com

Her work for orchestra 'Liguria' impressed me. Another interesting work for me is 'Empireo'

Interesting link, thanks, Mr R. !


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 25, 2014, 12:12:25 am
Not to be patronizing, but her name is spelled Tarrodi as the link shows

Well it is not. It is just a necessary correction of my stupid mistake: of course it is Tarrodi


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 25, 2014, 09:26:59 am
Not to be patronizing, but her name is spelled Tarrodi as the link shows

Well it is not. It is just a necessary correction of my stupid mistake: of course it is Tarrodi

This composer was totally unknown to me. I no I shood haf done spelt it rite, especially since I assume Andrea is femail and we all needs to moore "gender sensitive" deese dayz. I may have been thinkin Taboolie.
But the link worked fine, I sampled Tarrodi's music and Andrea Tarrodi is a name to remember.
She is indeed a talent, esp in orchestration..I heard echoes of John Adams in Liguria, but
Tarrodi's melodies are much less abstract. I hope Swedish radio provides much more of Andrea Tarrodi's music


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on March 25, 2014, 09:35:03 am
 ;D


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Greg K on April 06, 2014, 05:50:49 am
Finally listened to Pergament's "Jewish Poem".  Wow, - what an inspired and affecting piece, with an especially uplifting and beneficient concluding movement, though I've no idea what the text is, or is even about.  Surprised no one seems to have commented on this superlative work.  An exceptional performance also, with wonderful soloists (notably the soprano).  Attention never flagged or even wavered over 75', and again, the final 10 or 12 minutes are truly sublime. Sincere thanks to Sicmu/Alex for providing it.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Gauk on April 06, 2014, 08:05:02 am
This composer was totally unknown to me. I no I shood haf done spelt it rite, especially since I assume Andrea is femail and we all needs to moore "gender sensitive" deese dayz. I may have been thinkin Taboolie.

Mistake - it's the Italian equivalent of Andrew. I remember a meeting where a speaker referred to an Italian friend of mine called Andrea as "she", whereupon he stood up (he was in the audience), jabbed his finger at his chin, and called out, "I have a beard!".


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: ttle on April 25, 2014, 05:11:27 pm
This composer was totally unknown to me. I no I shood haf done spelt it rite, especially since I assume Andrea is femail and we all needs to moore "gender sensitive" deese dayz. I may have been thinkin Taboolie.

Mistake - it's the Italian equivalent of Andrew. I remember a meeting where a speaker referred to an Italian friend of mine called Andrea as "she", whereupon he stood up (he was in the audience), jabbed his finger at his chin, and called out, "I have a beard!".
If it was confusing others, I would have changed my first name to remove all doubts..but I am not famous..
It is always unwise to add a pinch of salt to an already tasty dish, but let me try it all the same.
Italians have a point here. After all, Andrew, Andrea, André, Andris and all this kind of names probably come from "andros", ancient Greek word for man (as opposed to woman, while "anthropos" is the human being in general).
However, the safest is to remember that there are some national variants here. So, as a rule:
Andrea from Italy is a man,
Andrea from Hungary is a woman,
Andreea from Romania is a woamn (mind the double "e"),
André from France is a man, and Andrée a woman,
Elfrida Andree from Sweden was a woman, but then, Andree was her surname  ;D


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Holger on April 25, 2014, 05:54:02 pm
This composer was totally unknown to me. I no I shood haf done spelt it rite, especially since I assume Andrea is femail and we all needs to moore "gender sensitive" deese dayz. I may have been thinkin Taboolie.

Mistake - it's the Italian equivalent of Andrew. I remember a meeting where a speaker referred to an Italian friend of mine called Andrea as "she", whereupon he stood up (he was in the audience), jabbed his finger at his chin, and called out, "I have a beard!".
If it was confusing others, I would have changed my first name to remove all doubts..but I am not famous..
It is always unwise to add a pinch of salt to an already tasty dish, but let me try it all the same.
Italians have a point here. After all, Andrew, Andrea, André, Andris and all this kind of names probably come from "andros", ancient Greek word for man (as opposed to woman, while "anthropos" is the human being in general).
However, the safest is to remember that there are some national variants here. So, as a rule:
Andrea from Italy is a man,
Andrea from Hungary is a woman,
Andreea from Romania is a woamn (mind the double "e"),
André from France is a man, and Andrée a woman,
Elfrida Andree from Sweden was a woman, but then, Andree was her surname  ;D

As a German, let me also add the variants used here: in Germany, Andrea is a woman, and the corresponding male name is Andreas.


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: dhibbard on August 09, 2014, 04:23:38 pm
just beefed up the Swedish composers section.....


Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: Elroel on June 04, 2018, 01:29:18 pm
Gunnar Bucht, an important Swedish Composer, but little known outside that country, wrote his 17th symphony last year.

I posted three of his other compositions, all radio recordings, in the Swedish Donload Section.

Hopr you like them too.



Title: Re: Swedish Music
Post by: relm1 on June 05, 2018, 01:17:55 am
Gunnar Bucht, an important Swedish Composer, but little known outside that country, wrote his 17th symphony last year.

I posted three of his other compositions, all radio recordings, in the Swedish Donload Section.

Hopr you like them too.



I really liked these works.  Thanks for posting.  All of them were interesting contemporary works that are routed in tradition.  I wish I understood the texts behind them more because it seems to be specifically influenced by the German composers (Beethoven/Mahler, etc).  Either way, a very fine composer and I very much enjoyed the two hours of music I listened to of his tonight.  Thank you.