The Art-Music Forum

Little-known music of all eras => Downloads discussion => Topic started by: jowcol on September 04, 2012, 04:54:11 pm



Title: German Music
Post by: jowcol on September 04, 2012, 04:54:11 pm
Kurt Hessenberg: Piano Concerto, Op. 21
(http://www.cassandrarecords.com/images/artists/KH1939-m.jpg)

Friedrich Wilhelm Schmorr, Piano
Philharmonia Hungarica, Cond Siegfried Krüller

Radio broadcast, Date Unknown

From the collection of Karl Miller


Wikipedia Bio:

Kurt Hessenberg (August 17, 1908 – June 17, 1994) was a German composer and professor at the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in Frankfurt am Main.

Life
Kurt Hessenberg was born on August 17, 1908 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, as the fourth and last child of the lawyer Eduard Hessenberg and his wife Emma, née Kugler. Among his ancestors was Heinrich Hoffmann, whose famous children's book Struwwelpeter Hessenberg was to arrange for children's choir (op. 49) later in his life. From 1927–1931 Hessenberg studied at the Leipzig Conservatory. Among his teachers were Günter Raphael (composition) and Robert Teichmüller (piano). In 1933 Hessenberg became a teacher at the Hoch'sche Konservatorium in Frankfurt am Main, where he himself had taken his earliest music lessons. In 1940 Hessenberg received the "Nationaler Kompositionspreis" (national prize for composition), joined the NSDAP in 1942[1], and in 1951 he was awarded the Robert-Schumann-Prize of the city of Düsseldorf for his cantata "Vom Wesen und Vergehen" op. 45. Hessenberg was appointed professor of composition at the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in 1953 and taught there until his retirement in 1973. Kurt Hessenberg died in Frankfurt am Main on June 17, 1994.[2]

Hessenberg's work contributed significantly to the repertoire of the Protestant churches in the 20th century. Among his most noted students were Hans Zender and Peter Cahn.



Bio from Cassandra Records


Kurt Hessenberg (1908-1994)
(b Frankfurt, Aug. 17, 1908; d Frankfurt, June 17, 1994). German composer. He studied in Leipzig (1927-31) with Günther Raphael (composition) and Robert Teichmüller (piano), and in 1933 he was appointed to teach at the Hoch Conservatory (later known as the ‘Musikhochschule’) in Frankfurt. He remained there throughout his career, and was made professor in 1953. All major genres have been represented in his oeuvre of 135 opus numbers consisting of 4 symphonies, numerous other orchestral and concerto works, an abundant variety of chamber music, a body of organ compositions, a wealth of choral and vocal works, and an opera. Possessing great facility in composition, Hessenberg evolved an effective idiom that draws from a rich musical heritage but is in no way confined by it. He combines a fluent contrapuntal skill (developed from his love of Baroque music) with a quite individual tonal harmonic style. His slow movements have a delicately woven poetry, together with – in his music for voices – a very smooth melodic line. Among the many awards made to him were the National Composition Prize (1940), the Robert Schumann Prize given by the city of Düsseldorf (1951), 2 Goethe Plaques, one given by the city of Frankfurt (1973) and the other by the government of Hesse (1979), and the Order of Merit first-class of the German Federal Republic (1989).









Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on September 04, 2012, 05:11:32 pm
Music of Heinrich Kaminski
(http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Lib-BIG/Kaminski-Heinrich-02.jpg)

1 Intro
2. Dorishche Musik (1933)


Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
Jan Koetsier, Conductor

3. Intro
4. Concerto Grosso
5. Outro


Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra
Othmar Maga, conductor

Radio Broadcasts, Dates Unknown

From the collection of Karl Miller


Essay about Dorian Music from Classical Iconoclast

Who was Heinrich Kaminski (1886-1946)? Admired by Arnold Schoenberg and a leading figure in German music circles, he's largely forgotten today, though there are signs of a major revival. Listen to Kaminski's Dorische-musik (Dorian Music) on the Berliner Philharmoniker website. Star conductor Andris Nelsons conducts the Berliner Philharmoniker, soloists Amihai Grosz,  Ludwig Quandt and Andreas Buschatz.

It's a gloriously affirmative work, passionately reasserting the ideals of Bach and Beethoven. "Music", Kaminski said, should motivate people to "trace the roots of life and the meaning of human existence". He saw his duty as "bearing witness to the light".

Kaminski's Dorian music starts without hesitation and goes straight into full development, buoyed up by confident purpose. This isn't abstract music for its own sake. Beethovenian forward thrust, direct quotes from Bach. To quote the Berliner Philharmoniker notes "from polyphonic concentration....Kaminski creates free flowing spatial music characterized by extreme tempo and rhythmic shifts....It is a genuinely forward-looking work, gripping in its unique mix of eruptive energy and mystical immersion".
 
It's amazingly uplifting, and spiritually powerful. Yet, note, it was written and first performed in 1934, by Herrmann Scherchen in Switzerland. What, one might think was there to be so confident about? Kaminski's response was, on July 4, 1933, to create an “order of those that love”. The rules of this order demanded that its members “hate no one and nothing, and must not be seduced into hate by evil willfulness or abusive actions. Hate is to be overcome by No-Hate”. Advocates of non-violence, like Gandhi, and Aung San Suu Kyi  think that breaking cycles of hate might just work, though Kaminski's faith in the context of the horrors that were to come might seem naive.

Kaminski was involved with the liberal Munich avant garde, from which his ideals may have sprung, but he was also part of the "inner resistance" of K A Hartmann and others. Perhaps, too, Kaminksi's principles may have come from his father. Kaminski senior had been a Catholic priest, who'd quit the priesthood on principle after the First Vatican Council in 1869/70 (the one that introduced papal infallibility). So in a sense, we owe Kaminski's birth to his father's opposition to the Pope. But the Kaminski family were originally Jewish, from Poland. This status seemed to have confounded the Nazis. He lost his job in Berlin in 1933, apparently for political reasons, but his music wasn't banned until 1938. Then the ban was lifted in 1941 because they thought he was a quarter Jew not a half-Jew. Racial stereotypes aren't rational. Life wasn't kind to Kaminski. He lost most of his family during the war and died himself soon after. But when I listen to his Dorian Music, it's vital, humanistic spirit seems unextinguishable. The piece isn't available on CD, though there are clips on Universal Editions. All the more reason to cherish the Berliner-Philharmoniker performance, which is perhaps as good as it gets.
Posted by Doundou Tchil



Wikipedia Bio

Heinrich Kaminski (4 July 1886 - 21 June 1946) was a German composer.

Life
Kaminski was born in Tiengen in the Schwarzwald, the son of an Old Catholic priest of Jewish parentage. After a short period working in a bank in Offenbach, he moved to Heidelberg, originally to study politics. However, a chance meeting with Martha Warburg changed his mind: she recognised his musical gift and became his patroness. In 1909 he went to Berlin and began studying music at the Stern Conservatoire, piano with Severin Eisenberger.

In 1914 he began work as a piano teacher in Benediktbeuern. His friends and contemporaries at this time included the painter Emil Nolde and also Franz Marc, whose wife was among his piano students.

During World War I Kaminski was also active as a choirmaster and teacher of composition. Later he received a professorship at the Prussian Academy of Arts in Berlin, where he became director of a master class in composition (thus treading in the footsteps of Hans Pfitzner). His most significant pupils were Carl Orff, Heinz Schubert und Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling.

His contract was terminated in 1933 with no renewal on the grounds of his "political opinions" and he returned to Benediktbeuern. Various attempts to re-establish his career came to nothing for the same reason. A check of his ancestry - he had been categorised in 1938 as a "half-Jew", and in 1941 declared a "quarter-Jew" - led to an ongoing ban on the performance of his works. He found himself obliged to flee, to France and Switzerland among other places.

Between 1939 and 1945 he lost three children, and died himself in 1946 at Ried, Bavaria.







Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on September 04, 2012, 05:26:27 pm
Hermann Schroeder Piano Concerto
(http://www.schott-music.com/shop/resources/654517.jpg)

Tiny Wirtz, Piano
Köln Radio Symphony Orchestra
Wilhelm Schrichter, conductor

From the collection of Karl Miller

Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown


Wikipedia Bio

Hermann Schroeder (26 March 1904 in Bernkastel – 7 October 1984 in Bad Orb) was a German composer and a Catholic church musician.

He spent the greatest part of his life’s work in the Rheinland. His main sphere of activity as composer, conductor and organist were in addition to his work as Professor of choral conducting, counterpoint and composition at the Hochschule für Musik Köln and conducting various semiprofessional ensembles such as the Bach-Verein Köln and the Rheinischer Kammerchor.

Schroeder's works are characterized by the employment of elements of Gregorian chant, harmonized with quintal and quartal harmonies.

The following quotation describes his creative principle most clearly: "connection to the church-mode melos in the chromatic realm while simultaneously retaining the relativity of the intervallic values."[verification needed]

Important works: Missa Gregoriana, Missa dorica, Hermann und Leander (opera), organ music, folk-song settings, German settings of the Ordinary and Proper of the Mass.




Bio from Schott Music



Hermann Schroeder, born on 26 March 1904 in Bernkastel-Kues (Mosel), died on 7 October 1984 in Bad Orb, studied at the Cologne Musikhochschule (1926-30) with Heinrich Lemacher and Walter Braunfels (composition), Hans Bachem (organ), Hermann Abendroth (conducting) and Dominicus Johner (Gregorian chant). He was music teacher in Cologne (1930-38) and cathedral organist in Trier (1938/39).

From 1946-1981 he taught music theory at the Cologne Musikhochschule and was director of Cologne’s Bach Society (1947-1962). With H. Lemacher, Schroeder has published several textbooks on harmony, counterpoint and musical form, which have gained wide currency in German-speaking countries. In 1952 he was awarded the Robert Schumann Prize of the city of Düsseldorf, in 1955 the first prize in the organ competition at Haarlem/the Netherlands, in 1956 he received the Arts Prize from the state of Rheinland-Pfalz (1956) and in 1974 he was appointed honorary doctor by the University of Bonn.

Schroeder is one of the most important German composers of the  20th century for organ. His music combines elements of the Middle Ages (fauxbourdon, ostinato technique, Gregorian modes), 20th-century polyphony and the linear, atonal writing of Hindemith. The chamber music for organ and other instruments constituted a special field of his musical activity.








Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on September 04, 2012, 07:58:26 pm
Just to add that the Hessenberg Piano Concerto was written between 1939 and 1940 and revised in 1956.

Many thanks for this(and the other) uploads :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on September 04, 2012, 08:23:42 pm
Always a pleasure.  Do check out the Escudero-- it's gorgeous.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on September 06, 2012, 12:57:59 am
Music of Jurg Baur
REPOST FROM UC-- LOOK IN THE UC REPOSTS FOLDER
(http://www.wz-newsline.de/polopoly_fs/1.31979.1289831787!/httpImage/onlineImage.jpeg_gen/derivatives/landscape_300/onlineImage.jpeg)

Pentagramm, Concerto for Wind Quartet (Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown)
Danzi Quintet, Cologne(?) Radio Symphony Orchestra
Zdenek Macal, conductor

Symphony 1
Duisburg Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Foster, conductor (Date Unknown)

Duisburger Sinfonia (Patetcia)
Duisburg Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Foster, conductor (1983)

MP3s, 192 kps
Not commercially released
From the collection of Karl Miller

Quote
We have some clarification on these tracks from Holger--

actually the First Symphony is the same work as the Duisburger Sinfonia, I guess it might even be the same performance maybe recorded by two different persons.

This is what is behind the confusion: Jürg Baur's First Symphony is called "Sinfonie einer Stadt (Patetica)", which means "Symphony of a City" in English. The city Baur means is Duisburg, if I remember correctly he composed in on commission for some jubilee. The piece is from 1983. As some members are interested in movement titles, here is what I know:

I. Invocation (Passacaglia)
II. Melancholie
III. Scherzo tumultoso
IV. [don't know]

Another  update, courtesy of Holger:

Quote
Checking the information I gathered for myself once again, there is another correction regarding the Jürg Baur upload. The orchestra playing in the "Pentagramm" Concerto is not the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra, but the Radio Filharmonisch Orkest (from the Netherlands). This can be heard if listening to the announcer carefully. To provide some more details, here are the members of the Danzi Quintet who play in this recording: Frans Vester (flute), Koen van Slogtere (oboe), Piet Honigh (clarinet), Brian Pollard (Bassoon) and Adriaan van Woudenberg (French Horn).


I’ve posted music of the German composer Jurg Baur in the downloads section,  Pentagramm, a Concerto for Wind Quartet,  his first symphony, and his Duisberger Sonfonia.    Below the portrait, I've got some highlights from the Wikipedia page for him below:


Wikipedia Bio

Jürg Baur (11 November 1918 – 31 January 2010) was a German composer of classical music.
•   
Education
Baur was born in Düsseldorf, where he achieved early recognition as a composer at the age of 18, when his First String Quartet was premiered at the Düsseldorf Hindenburg Secondary School by the then-famous Prisca Quartet. He studied from 1937 to 1948 (interrupted by army service from 1939–45, including several months as a Russian prisoner of war) at the Hochschule für Musik Köln: composition with Philipp Jarnach, piano with Karl Hermann Pillney, and organ and sacred music with Michael Schneider (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42; Levi 2001; Wallerang 2010). Even before completing his conservatory studies, he was appointed lecturer in music theory at the Düsseldorf Conservatory in 1946 (Levi 2001). He did postgraduate studies in musicology with Karl Gustav Fellerer and Willi Kahl from 1948 to 1951 at the University of Cologne (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42). In 1952 he was appointed choirmaster and organist at the St Paulus-Kirche in Düsseldorf, a post he left in 1960 when he was awarded a scholarship from the German Academy to study for six months at the Villa Massimo in Rome. He twice returned to Rome for extended visits, in 1968 and 1980 (Levi 2001).The vivid impression made by the Italian city is reflected in the Italian-titled works he composed there, including the Concerto romano for oboe and orchestra (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42).

Compositional career
Baur was one of the last composers of the old school. After the war, he remained faithful to his teacher Jarnach’s conservative stance, and never became an extreme avant-gardist (Wallerang 2010). Widespread recognition as a composer came comparatively late. Béla Bartók was his strongest stylistic influence at first, but in the 1950s he began to use twelve-tone technique. Anton Webern’s music became his model in works such as the Third String Quartet (1952), the Quintetto sereno for wind quintet (1958)—which also uses aleatory techniques—the Sonata for two pianos (1957), and the Ballata romana (1960) (Levi 2001). Later, he developed a marked propensity for quotations from earlier music. Particularly striking examples include Heinrich Isaac's "Innsbruck, ich muß dich lassen" in the Concerto da camera, a theme from Bach’s Musical Offering in the Ricercari for organ, as well as in the Kontrapunkte 77 for three woodwinds, and Schumann themes in Sentimento del tempo and, especially, in Musik mit Robert Schumann (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42). Other composers whose works Baur has quoted include Dvořák, Strauss, Gesualdo, Mozart and Schubert (Levi 2001).

Primarily a composer of orchestral and instrumental music, Baur also produced a number of works for less mainstream instruments such as the recorder and the accordion (Jacobs 1993; Levi 2001). He was one of the first composers to introduce the recorder to the new musical trends of the post-war era, with Incontri (1960), for recorder and piano, Mutazioni (1962) and Pezzi uccelli (1964), both for unaccompanied alto recorder, and the virtuosic Concerto da camera "Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit", for recorder and chamber orchestra of 1975 (Wallerang 2010).

In his 87th year, Baur completed his only opera, Der Roman mit dem Kontrabass, to a libretto by Michael Leinert after the story by Anton Chekhov. Commissioned on the occasion of the composer's 85th birthday in 2003 by the Deutsche Oper am Rhein, it was premiered at the Partika-Saal of the Robert Schumann Hochschule, Düsseldorf, on 25 November 2005, with Marco Vassilli and Kerstin Pohle singing the two main roles (Smychkov and the Countess Anastasia), Szymon Marciniak as the solo contrabassist, and Thomas Gabrisch conducting (Wallerang 2005).


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 04, 2012, 06:24:46 pm
Many thanks to britishcomposer for recent batch of uploads of music by Jenner, Weweler, and Sekles :)! The latter two composers are new names to me, so these uploads are greatly appreciated :).


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Elroel on November 05, 2012, 04:52:30 pm
From my side also thanks for these German works. The the first and the last names I heard before. In Germany I had the pleasure to find a work of Jenner in the program. The name Weweler is new to me. 
Listening to the music I find again (and again, and...) that so many composers are lost in oblivion.
This may be right in some cases, but many times when a composer emerges,  I'm surprised with the music.
Why should we have to have 1200 or more series of Beethoven symphonies or those from  let say Mahler -splendid works! of course-, but I don't buy many double or more complete cycles, unless I'm very confident they are worth it. I rather buy cd's from un unknown composer in stead. Well I guess that's one of the reasons I'm (and many more of us?) a member here.




Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on November 05, 2012, 05:12:52 pm
From my side also thanks for these German works. The the first and the last names I heard before. In Germany I had the pleasure to find a work of Jenner in the program. The name Weweler is new to me. 
Listening to the music I find again (and again, and...) that so many composers are lost in oblivion.
This may be right in some cases, but many times when a composer emerges,  I'm surprised with the music.
Why should we have to have 1200 or more series of Beethoven symphonies or those from  let say Mahler -splendid works! of course-, but I don't buy many double or more complete cycles, unless I'm very confident they are worth it. I rather buy cd's from un unknown composer in stead. Well I guess that's one of the reasons I'm (and many more of us?) a member here.




Agree 100% :) :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 05, 2012, 08:05:13 pm
May I second agreeing with everything in Elroel's post? Very well said :) :).


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 08, 2012, 10:26:37 pm
Thank you, britishcomposer, for the Emilie Mayer Symphony no. 4 :) :)! It's always good to hear from the women symphonists. Johanna Senfter anyone?


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: shamus on November 09, 2012, 02:38:43 pm
I greatly enjoyed the Mayer No. 4, had heard her No. 5, I think on a Dreyer-Gaido CD, probably deleted by now, and would love to hear her piano concerto and Faust overture, though I don't think that concert was recorded. In response to the mention of Johanna Senfter, I put her Sym no. 4 in German Downloads, and would certainly like to hear more of her orchestral music, too. Thanks to all. Jim


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 09, 2012, 08:43:33 pm
Many, many thanks, shamus, for your re-upload of Senfter's substantial Symphony no. 4 :) :)! It's also a rare example of a symphony in the key of B major (Senfter apparently enjoyed writing in this key, as you can see from my list of her works) ;D! Unfortunately, it is the only one of her many orchestral works that can be heard-but that makes the recording of Symphony no. 4 all the more valuable :). Perhaps CPO (or another enterprising record company) should check out Senfter's accomplished catalogue...


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: JimL on November 09, 2012, 08:59:03 pm
Are you sure it's B Major (H-dur in German) not B-flat Major (B-dur)?


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 09, 2012, 10:04:03 pm
Ah, you're probably right, Jim! Senfter's Wikipedia article lists it as being in B major, but klassika.info and Shamus' post say B-flat major. Aw, and I was really hoping for a B major symphony ;D! The only other B major symphonies I am aware of are Shostakovich 2, Haydn 46, Korngold Sinfonietta (a symphony in all but name), and a symphony by Georg Mann!


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: ttle on November 09, 2012, 10:08:21 pm
Thank you, britishcomposer, for the Emilie Mayer Symphony no. 4 :) :)!
Not that it is so important, but WIkipedia mentions the B minor symphony as being No. 6. Are there actually only twxo (or three) numbered symphonies out of the mentioned eight?


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: ttle on November 09, 2012, 10:30:17 pm
Ah, you're probably right, Jim! Senfter's Wikipedia article lists it as being in B major, but klassika.info and Shamus' post say B-flat major. Aw, and I was really hoping for a B major symphony ;D! The only other B major symphonies I am aware of are Shostakovich 2, Haydn 46, Korngold Sinfonietta (a symphony in all but name), and a symphony by Georg Mann!
The beginning of J. Senfter's 4th is tonally quite ambiguous, rather in a Franz Schmidt vein, but then it centres around B-flat indeed - and the conclusion is unambiguously in B-flat Major.
Here are some B Major symphonies: Philip Greeley Clapp's Sixth "Golden Gate" and Tenth, Robert Farnon's Second "Ottawa", Edward Burlingame Hill's First, Feliks Łabuński's Symphony in three parts, George Lloyd's Fourth "Arctic", Cipriani Potter's Third, Charles Tournemire's Second "Ouessant" (starting in B-flat minor, but ending in B major), Andria Balanchivadze's First, Alberto Williams's Sixth "La muerte del cometa".


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: britishcomposer on November 09, 2012, 11:14:03 pm
Not that it is so important, but WIkipedia mentions the B minor symphony as being No. 6. Are there actually only twxo (or three) numbered symphonies out of the mentioned eight?

I was aware of this but I decided to follow the information given by the broadcaster, Deutschlandradio Kultur. I will upload an interval talk about the composer and her work shortly. It's in German but perhaps some of you are interested and able to follow.

EDIT: It's available for download now. I have added the link to my original post of the symphony.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 09, 2012, 11:46:53 pm
Thanks, ttle, for mentioning some more B major symphonies :)! I should have known the Clapp and Williams-I catalogued them ::)! And sincere apologies to Lloyd and Tournemire as well :-[!


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: ttle on November 10, 2012, 08:55:41 am
Thanks, ttle, for mentioning some more B major symphonies :)! I should have known the Clapp and Williams-I catalogued them ::)! And sincere apologies to Lloyd and Tournemire as well :-[!
You are very welcome! :) Actually, Radio Nacional Argentina broadcasted Alberto Williams's First Symphony last night (there are quite a few gaps and hiccups, not sure whether anyone is interested in having it here). It is, by all accounts, in B minor. Well, either they have used a very low pitch or the tape has a serious speed problem, because it definitely sounds like a low-pitched B flat minor to me...  ::)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: ttle on November 10, 2012, 09:20:36 am
Not that it is so important, but WIkipedia mentions the B minor symphony as being No. 6. Are there actually only twxo (or three) numbered symphonies out of the mentioned eight?

I was aware of this but I decided to follow the information given by the broadcaster, Deutschlandradio Kultur. I will upload an interval talk about the composer and her work shortly. It's in German but perhaps some of you are interested and able to follow.

EDIT: It's available for download now. I have added the link to my original post of the symphony.
Thank you! They do refer to the "Fourth Symphony in B minor". So does the program of the concert. This uncertainty is a bit intriguing, since Emilie Mayer's symphonies were actually performed in those years and apparently were numbered. It is true that symphonic cycles by other composers (e.g. Dvořák) experienced quite some change of numbering over the years.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on November 18, 2012, 03:48:52 pm
Thank you very much, Holger, for the EH Meyer string quartets :)! I had first discovered this composer through the many pieces of his that are on the YouTube channel "WatchBlueSkies"-what a fine composer indeed :)!


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on December 08, 2012, 11:50:36 pm
Thank you very much for your recent batch of uploads, Atsushi, not least your uploads of the music of the German composers Lothar, Kempff, and Pringsheim :) :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: A.S on December 09, 2012, 01:59:36 am
Thank you very much for your recent batch of uploads, Atsushi, not least your uploads of the music of the German composers Lothar, Kempff, and Pringsheim :) :)

  You are welcome, enjoy ;)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on December 14, 2012, 09:23:46 pm
Many thanks, Elroel, for the Joseph Haas works :) :)! There is also an mp3 album of his organ works: http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Haas-Orgelwerke/dp/B005G8MA9K/ref=sr_1_6?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1355519816&sr=1-6&keywords=joseph+haas

a CD of his solo piano works: http://www.amazon.com/Haas-Piano-Works-Gerit-Lense/dp/B001PU73LI/ref=sr_1_13?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1355520138&sr=1-13&keywords=joseph+haas

and a recording of his string quartet: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6674645E74A2F582

 :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Elroel on December 15, 2012, 08:37:01 am
And thank you kyjo for the extra info on Haas.
This is, at least outside Germany, an overlooked composer.

Elroel


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Holger on December 15, 2012, 08:50:54 am
In Germany, Joseph Haas is mostly ignored as well, in fact. Thanks for your uploads, Roelof - I am just tracking them all down, which takes its time since my internet connection is a little slow this morning. Could you also give us a scan of the sleeve for the performers etc.?


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Elroel on December 15, 2012, 03:37:02 pm
Joseph Haas
As requested by Holger, I added the performers in the dowloadsection.

Elroel


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: britishcomposer on December 19, 2012, 12:47:52 pm
Thank you Elroel for the Rosenfeld pieces! I heard an interesting violin sonata many years ago and his opera "Kniefall in Warschau".
However, the link to the Three Nocturnes is currently invalid.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Elroel on December 19, 2012, 07:37:08 pm
Just fixed the link for Rosenfeld's Drei Mokturnen.

It looks ok now

Elroel


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on December 19, 2012, 07:47:50 pm
Thanks from me as well, Roelof :)

For those interested in hearing more of Rosenfeld's music, his Piano and Cello Concertos as well as a Scherzo for violin and small orchestra are on YouTube. All are worthwhile listening :)

But, then again, I probably shouldn't be bringing up or praising YouTube-see Colin's post: http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,2049.0.html

 :-\


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on December 22, 2012, 04:42:32 pm
Thank you, Sicmu, for the Kurt Thomas Christmas Oratorio, just in time for the holidays :)

Here's an article on Thomas from bach-cantatas.com:

The prominent German choral conductor, pedagogue, and composer, (Georg Hugo) Kurt Thomas, passed his school years at Lennep in Rhineland and received some musical instruction from Hermann Inderan at Barmen. He entered the Leipzig Konservatorium in 1922, where he studied the piano with Robert Teichmüller, theory with Max Ludwig and composition with Hermann Grabner. Whilst in Leipzig, Thomas came into contact with Karl Straube, who was Thomaskantor at the time and who became the young student’s mentor and gave him constant help and advice. After Leipzig, he went on to study composition with Arnold Mendelssohn in Darmstadt.

 Kurt Thomas' first significant successes were as a composer: in 1927 he came first in a competition and was awarded the newly-created Prussian ‘Beethoven Prize’ for his Mass and St Mark Passion. Rapidly he became one of the leading figures in the church-music revival movement in progress during the 1920’s. He was a composer of quite exceptional promise and has already written several notable works. His a cappella Mass in A minor for solo voices and two choirs, composed when he was 19, is a work of singular beauty and of remarkable maturity and sureness of touch. While intensely modern and individual in technique and idiom, it was by no means extravagant or revolutionary. It was performed twice at the Leipzig Thomaskirche and in other towns, and has always produced a profound impression, notably at the 55th Festival of the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein held in 1925 at Kiel, when the critics from all over Germany showed a rare unanimity in declaring it to be the outstanding feature of the Festival. His pianoforte trio, performed in 1925 at a concert of the International Society for Contemporary Music, is also a fine and admirably written work, sometimes a little ruthless in its dissonances but full of real substance and vigorous life.

 Kurt Thomas taught theory and composition at the Leipzig Konservatorium from 1925 to 1934, and was conductor of the choir at the Institute of Church Music in Leipzig from 1928 to 1934. In 1934 he became professor for choral conducting in Berlin, a post he held until 1939. The first of three volumes of his handbook of choral conducting was published in 1935; reprinted several times, it has remained a standard work to this day. From 1939 to 1945 he headed the newly-founded ‘Musisches Gymnasium’ in Frankfurt am Main. In Frankfurt he was also Kantor of the Dreikönigskirche from 1945 to 1956.

 In 1947 Kurt Thomas began lecturing in choral conducting at the North German Music Academy in Detmold (what is today the Detmold Musikhochschule), a post he held until 1955. His numerous concert tours with various choirs in the ensuing years enhanced his reputation as a choir director of outstanding ability. It was therefore not surprising that he was offered the post of Thomaskantor following Günther Ramin’s sudden death in 1956. Thomas represented a return to the old tradition – interrupted by Karl Straube and Günther Ramin - of Thomaskantors who were also composers.

 The first concerts conducted by the new Thomaskantor were enough to make the differences between him and his predecessor clear. Unlike Günther Ramin, whose interpretations frequently had an improvisatory quality, Thomas set great store by comprehensive and accurate rehearsals. In contrasts to Günther Ramin’s somewhat Romantic approach to Bach, he pursued a style characterised more by historical authencity, which demanded a good deal of rethinking from his Thomaskirche choristers and consequently required a period of adjustment. Once they had found their bearings, they and their new conductor were hugely successful, both in Leipzig and on tour.

 But Kurt Thomas fell soon with the GDR cultural approach, who were hampering and even refusing permission for concert tours in the West. At the same time, socialist arts policies were aimed at gaining more control over the church and Thomas was forced to waste ever more time on frustrating (and frequently futile) negotiations with functionaries of the ruling Socialist Unity Party, Finally, at the end of 1960, he provocatively made his remaining in office contingent upon obtaining approval for a concert tour to East Germany. This not being forthcoming, he decided to remain in the Federal Republic of Germany (where he happened to be at the time). In West Germany, he first resumed his post with the Frankfurt am Main Dreikönigskirche, and also took over the direction of the Cologne Bachverein and the Frankfurt Kantorei. In 1966 (or 1969) began teaching choral conducting at what is today the Lübeck Musikhochschule.

 Publications: The important manual Lehrbuch der Chorleitung (3 volumes, Leipzig, 1935-1948).
 Compositions: Many choral works, including a Mass (1925), Passionmusik nach den Evangelisten Markus, Weihnachts-Oratorium, Auferstebungs-Oratorium, cantatas, Psalms, and motets; several orchestral works, including a Piano Concerto; chamber music, organ pieces, and songs.


It might also be worth mentioning that in 1936 Thomas won a silver medal in the art competitions of the Olympic Games for his Olympic Cantata. Also, he wrote a Violin Concerto which is not mentioned in the above article.

Here is a picture of him:

http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Bio/Thomas-Kurt-1.jpg

 :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: BrianA on May 21, 2013, 02:11:03 am
Rainolf,

The link you so kindly provided for the Cilencek symphony no 2 unfortunately does not seem to be working.

Brian


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: fr8nks on May 21, 2013, 12:49:57 pm
It works if you remove # and replace it with /?


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: BrianA on May 21, 2013, 03:13:46 pm
Got it.  Thanks!


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Rainolf on May 21, 2013, 06:49:44 pm
I have now changed the # to a ? in the link to the symphony, hope it works now.



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on May 22, 2013, 01:11:39 am
Considering how little of Holler's music has been recorded this latest addition by Rainolof of a very substantial orchestral is very much welcomed :)

Incidentally, this work is sometimes nicknamed the "Bamberg Cathedral Symphony". Holler wrote two numbered symphonies which are(were) available on a very difficult to obtain Ambitus cd. I must say that I found them worthy.....but a trifle dull.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: kyjo on May 22, 2013, 01:44:45 am
I would also like to thank Rainolf for the Cilensek and Holler works :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: britishcomposer on May 22, 2013, 01:33:21 pm
Re Höller op. 18: the performing orchestra is the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra. The work had been uploaded by a youtuber last year but is no longer available.

Colin, I conjure you to listen again to the symphonies. Esp. No. 2 is a very characteristic work, brilliantly orchestrated. I love his somewhat cloddish harmonies.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on May 22, 2013, 02:15:25 pm
Re Höller op. 18: the performing orchestra is the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra. The work had been uploaded by a youtuber last year but is no longer available.

Colin, I conjure you to listen again to the symphonies. Esp. No. 2 is a very characteristic work, brilliantly orchestrated. I love his somewhat cloddish harmonies.

I shall certainly take your advice :)

I also have the Frescobaldi Variations and the Sweeelinck Variations on an old DGG cd.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: gabriel on May 22, 2013, 08:01:48 pm
I add more information about Holler´s work:

 Hymn uber gregorianische Choralmelodien, Opus 18 (1932/4)
1. Toccata   6:51
2. Ricercare    11:18
3. Adoration uber den Hymnus   5:46
4. Fantasie und Fuge   11:42

Karl Holler; Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart

Thanks a lot for the uploader!



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Rainolf on May 22, 2013, 08:25:47 pm
Thanks for the Information, Gabriel!

I have Höller's Piano Concerto, too, and will soon upload it.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: gabriel on May 23, 2013, 01:57:17 am
Thanks again, Rainolf!

More information about Holler´s piano concerto:

Piano Concerto, Op. 63 ”Bamberger” (1972/73)

It´s a 1973 live radio broadcast.
Artists:
Ludwig Hoffmann, piano.
Bamberger Symphoniker. 
Martin Turnovsky, conductor


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: britishcomposer on August 21, 2013, 05:17:27 pm
I have uploaded the Symphony by the German composer Peter Ronnefeld.
He wrote it in 1952, aged 17. You will find a short (German) introduction included.
He was also a gifted conductor. If anyone is interested I have a powerful recording of the Robert Browning Overture by Charles Ives, conducted by Ronnefeld.
I don’t know the reason for his early death. His son Matthias, also a gifted composer and recorded by Dacapo, died even younger from diabetes. Maybe this was the reason for his fathers death, too.

http://www.universaledition.com/Peter-Ronnefeld/composers-and-works/composer/609/biography (http://www.universaledition.com/Peter-Ronnefeld/composers-and-works/composer/609/biography)

The publisher states that the symphony lasts only 15 minutes, my recording takes about 25 min.
http://www.ricordi.de/ronnefeld-peter.0.html (http://www.ricordi.de/ronnefeld-peter.0.html)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on August 26, 2013, 03:11:53 pm
Sicmu posted recordings of the Bernhard Heiden Symphony No.2 and the Triple Concerto in the German Music Downloads thread. There is an argument that Heiden was just as much an American composer as a German:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernhard_Heiden (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernhard_Heiden)

I wonder about the provenance of these recordings and the identities of the performers: the "R.E. Symphony Orchestra" and the "Philharmonic Orchestra" ??? Who they ??? ;D


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: relm1 on September 07, 2013, 04:04:06 pm
Is it possible for someone to upload the Hans Werner Henze Barcarola from Proms 26?  The conductor was Knussen and the link to hear the performance is a page not found.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: britishcomposer on November 04, 2013, 08:38:38 pm
I have uploaded the only Symphony by Ilse Fromm-Michaels.
Though the work was written in 1938 it couldn't be performed until 1946 because F-M "was banned from performing or publishing her compositions" (wiki) by the Nazis.
It's a very complex piece, no easy-listening, but I think she deserves being rediscovered.
The conductor of this recording was her son Jost Michaels, also a renowned clarinettist and Pianist.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on November 04, 2013, 11:32:05 pm
Thanks to Mathias for the upload of the Fromm-Michaels Symphony :)

He says that it is "a very complex piece, no easy-listening". This may be true but should not put anyone off. The symphony is still very much in the received tradition of serious German symphonism and there is a determined solemnity about it which I find much appealing. Given the circumstances of its composition in 1938 when the composer can have had no hopes of it ever being performed the symphony is actually hugely impressive.

It is at least gratifying to see that the Symphony was given its first performance as early as 28 June 1946 in Hamburg by the North German Radio Symphony Orchestra under Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt-and what a fine conductor he was :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: calyptorhynchus on November 06, 2013, 03:51:57 am
I have a particualr interest in composers (and writers) banned, persecuted or murdered by the Nazis. Any perceived enemy of the Nazis is a friend of mine!

Fortunately Ilse Fromm-Michaels survived the war and now we hear her wonderful Symphony.

I find it complex and fascinating because it is short (only 20 minutes), but it contains all the elements of a classical symphony (1st movement, slow movement, scherzo and finale) and in such a short space sounds amazingly lonmg-breathed, in places almost Bruckerian. I find it very satisfying.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on March 13, 2014, 12:51:38 am
Manfred Trojahn: Symphony No. 1
(https://www.baerenreiter.com/uploads/pics/Teaser_Trojahn_01.jpg)


From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony 1 "Macrame"(1973-4)
Berlin Radio Symphony/ Peter Ruzicka



Wiki Bio:

Manfred Trojahn
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Manfred Trojahn (born 22 October 1949) is a German composer, flutist, conductor and writer.

Manfred Trojahn was born in Cremlingen in Lower Saxony and began his musical studies in 1966 in orchestra music at the music school of the city of Braunschweig. After graduating in 1970 he concluded his studies as a flutist at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg with Karlheinz Zöller. From 1971 he studied composition with Diether de la Motte. He also studied with György Ligeti, conducting with Albert Bittner. Since 1991 he is professor for composition at the Robert Schumann Hochschule in Düsseldorf. From 2004 until 2006 he was practitioner of the Deutscher Komponistenverband (German Composers Association); since 2008 he is vice-director of the music section of the Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin.


From https://www.baerenreiter.com
Manfred Trojahn is married to the stage- and costume-designer Dietlind Konold. He lives in Düsseldorf and Paris.

“Manfred Trojahn, the author of a sizable body of large-scale orchestral works, chamber music, and especially vocal music for various forces and several full-length operas, occupies what is in many respects a unique position in the music history of recent decades. He has defined his aesthetic stance by distancing himself from the sort of narrow and increasingly sclerotic notion of the musical avant-garde that took hold in the post-war centers of contemporary music. In contrast, Trojahn's aesthetic and compositional technique hearkens back to the musical past and to several exemplary composers, whether the modernist music of the ‘fin de siècle’ or such figures as Benjamin Britten and Hans Werner Henze.

Besides these ties with the musical past, Trojahn's music is governed above all by his personal experience, and it is only natural that his specific thoughts on these experiences should be applied time and again in his works. Trojahn is a self-reflective, almost ‘serial’ composer who tends to produce groups of pieces tightly related in their structure and emotional content. All the same, his concern is to break through the hermeticism that has beset standard avant-garde fare. The main focus of his interests lies on the communicative potential of music that is contemporary in a strong sense of the term.”







Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on March 13, 2014, 12:53:08 am
Another Article about Trojahn from http://www.takte-online.de

On 22 October, Manfred Trojahn celebrated his 60th birthday. Robert Maschka looks for traces of the “old forms” in Trojahn’s oeuvre, in order to find modernity which reveals itself in all genres of the composer’s copious output.

When Johannes Brahms played his Handel Variations to Richard Wagner in 1864, Wagner is said to have praised his younger rival, saying: “One sees what can still be achieved with the old forms when someone comes along who knows how to handle them.” In today’s context, Wagner’s praise of Brahms sets the tone for the discussion of contemporary composing which oscillates between an avant-garde aesthetic and historically aware interaction with tradition. In particular, that quiet reservation about too great a slavishness to tradition, as is discernible in Wagner’s somewhat patronizing tone, has survived the passage of time. Yet around two generations later it was Arnold Schönberg of all people, the founding father of modern music, who lauded Brahms as a progressive.

Traditions of genre

With Manfred Trojahn, today’s music world has in its midst a composer who, albeit differently from Brahms, is still able to derive something from “the old forms”. And so, Trojahn’s oeuvre can easily be divided into traditional genres, something which can no longer be taken for granted nowadays, though Trojahn, thanks to the almost protean art of adaptation like the all-round composer of the 18th century, has written in almost all of the common musical genres. And yet there is a basic difference between Trojahn and these predecessors: he no longer takes the traditional forms and genres for granted. On the contrary, the historical distance is considered and taken as a theme in the way he conceives his works; this is discussed here in a brief examination of them.

In the music of La Folia for two pianos, composed in 1982, a free, connected section of toccata-like baroque figurative work leads into an epilogue disappearing into the highest extremities, in which the D minor world of the venerable Folia seems to disappear into the irretrievable. Trojahn chose a comparable central idea for Palinsesto, his homage to Schubert composed for string quartet and soprano in 1996. This can be described as a process of recalling Schubert’s Goethe setting Nähe des Geliebten: at first, fragments appear out of ethereal string figurations, as in a palimpsest, followed by the complete final verse of the song. Consequently, the strings fall into a resounding silence, but only the quotation of the Schubertian song epilogue marks the fully recognisable conclusion. Using another approach, Trojahn’s 3rd String Quartet of 1983 moves between different times: on the one hand it can be heard as a homage to Beethoven, in the flexible disposition of the highly taut parts, reacting and communicating with each other, particularly as the very limited motivic material of the four movements is exceptionally pointedly and concisely shaped. On the other hand, Beethoven is not heard in a single note; on the contrary, this is unmistakably an artist of the late 20th century which we hear, as recognised in the structure of the movements leaning towards aphorism, in the harmony and gestural characteristic shape of the sound formulations.

In his most recent symphony to date, the 5th Symphony of 2004, Trojahn again deals with traditional genres in several respects. Thus, with its large orchestral forces, this three-movement work already displays a symphonic approach striving for the monumental, confirmed in the first movement with its dense motivic work. The following Intermezzo, with its shadowy treatment of sound seems like a neo-Romantic character piece in the style of an uneasy piece of night music, whilst the concluding elegy in the peaceful breath of melos conjures up a symphonic image of time which makes the actuality of real time a distant memory.

Determining positions

To formulate a position musically may in any case be something which concerns Trojahn in his composing. In the Requiem of 1983/85, revised in 2003, motivic reference is made to Stravinsky’s Requiem Canticles in a carefully considered way. For, like Stravinsky, in his version of the Requiem Trojahn is not striving for a dramatic sound-picture version of the text – comparable with the requiem masses of the Romantic period – instead he is seeking a method of representation which draws the liturgical and sacramental function of the texts into the compositional calculus.

In other words, while Trojahn’s compositions involve determining positions to that which exists, the listener doesn’t hear a strange language, but one which, despite all its novelty, wants to express the seemingly familiar: a comprehensible sound idiom. And such a conscious positioning can even lead to a kind of extension of another composer’s style. As a result, even the uninformed listener to the Three Songs by Lord Tennyson of 1996 would, because of the lyrical characteristic style and the clear structure of the songs, think of the composer to whom they are dedicated, namely Benjamin Britten. In these songs, Trojahn shows that an art of song in the spirit of Britten is still possible today. And likewise his other song settings are, thanks to his ability to put expressivity, sensitivity and subtlety into music, a single refutation of that fashionable view that poetry in music is an outdated artistic expression; this is why Schumann’s Kinderscenen title of “Der Dichter spricht” could be applied to the song composer Trojahn.

Theatre in the opera

What effect does the striving for an historically-conscious stance in his compositions have on Trojahn’s operatic works? As adopting a position and playing a part are related principles, it is scarcely surprising that Trojahn conceives his operas according to the forces available. As a result, he has become a reviver of a type of music theatre of Mozartian or Italian influence, thought of in terms of protagonists. What is more, Trojahn almost submerges himself in each of his stage creations. And through this trick he gives the appearance of precisely not being an omniscient narrator, even if he lets the main characters be swept onto the stage by the roaring wind in the interludes in Was ihr wollt (1998).

Thus Trojahn’s stage characters provide information in an eminently theatrical, vital and eloquent way, which in itself is a mystery and is unsure of itself. As early as Enrico (1991) and Was ihr wollt, but also in the later operas Limonen aus Sizilien (2003) and La Grande Magia (2008) the play within the play, self-projection and with it the role which one performs to another, become metaphors of existence. Stylisation, quotation, allusion and innuendo are here compositional means in the depiction of that lost self assurance which Trojahn’s stage characters, searching for themselves, make into symbols of the modern state. Whilst the composer allows this broken sense of existence characteristic of today’s insecure person to become art, we may recognize why Trojahn, to return to Schönberg’s dictum on Brahms, is a progressive. And as a result, on his 60th birthday, we listen to his rich output, with the result that he becomes even more familiar to us as a person; for along with Brahms, Trojahn, whose music is a tonal language like scarcely anyone else’s of our time, could say of himself: “In my music, I speak.”

Robert Maschka
Translation: Elizabeth Robinson
from [t]akte 2/2009



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on March 18, 2014, 04:47:35 pm
Dietr Acker: Symphony 1 "Lebenslaufe" (1977-8)
(http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Lib/Acker-Dieter-03.jpg)
From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony 1 "Lebenslaufe"
Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra/Dieter Cichiewicz
Radio Broadcast




From BachCantatas.Com
Born: November 3, 1940 - Sibiu, Romania
Died: May 27, 2006 - Munich, Germany

The German composer and pedagogue, Dieter Acker, was born in Sibiu, Romania of German parents. He studied piano, organ, and theory with Franz Xaver Dressler in Sibiu (1950-1958), then composition with Sigismund Todutza at the Cluj Conservatory (1959-1964),

After finishing his studiesm Dieter Acker taught theory and composition at the Cluj Conservatory (1964-1969). He then settled in West Germany and taught at the Robert Schumann Conservatory in Düsseldorf (1969-1972); he joined the faculty at the Munich Hochschule für Musik in 1972, where he was a professor of composition from 1976.

Machine Translation of Reviews of the First Symphony from the Acker Website at http://www.composeracker.de (http://www.composeracker.de):



        
Symphony No. I ("Curriculum vitae", 1977 / 78)

THE WORLD
Sometimes it happens that behind the folds of the pretty stale "Musica - Viva - concerts" in Munich lost a friendly smile. Dieter Acker, the 39-year-old Harald Genzmer successor as Professor of composition at the Munich Academy of music, was responsible for this time. His Symphony No. I titled "Curriculum vitae" is expressive, Mahlerian dimensions be summoned. On different levels of instrumental romp a myriad of thoughts, making arable but easily done. The bushes always permeable.

The naive honesty of this musical resumes disarmed. (vb)



MÜNCHNER MERKUR
...ein highly expressive work...The three movements are a serious one: in the ductus in Sonic density, in the interpretation.

...Acker fondness for swirling sounds for the grotesque, deep bass, Glissandi and shrill trumpets, sound volume and Ambitus remain in the memory. (K.R.Brachtel)

 
SÜDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG
It was looking forward to the premiere of the first Symphony by Dieter Acker. ...da step meaning pregnant huge brass choirs, because conversations between the soloists of the Orchestra spin, so to speak on SideShow, chatter loudly woodwind and sighing heavily the strings. Is the climax of the first movement a kind of "Breakthrough" - to new horizons? Fine Zieseliertes characterizes the second sentence ("delicate and transparent")..., the third then brings the final on Gipfelung in the symphonic drama.

Field can bypass audible with the Orchestra, he has a keen sense for effective sound layers, also for "grateful" orchestral parts. (W.Schreiber)



TZ - MUNICH
...His Opus stands out strikingly from the cosmopolitan egalitarianism of much of modernist productions...


HANNOVERSCHE ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG (03.02.1982)
"The days of new music in Hanover final concert"

...The Symphony works with all "materials" of the huge modern Symphony Orchestra. No doubt, field has an accurate knowledge of orchestral instruments and know how they as can be used effectively.

The Symphony has failed, is serious, powerful, and testifies to honest craftsmanship. (E. Limmert)



HAMBURGER ABENDBLATT (03.02.1982)
The Munich-based composer Dieter Acker has a heart for the listener.

He understands the Orchestra - all over the world as in groups and parts - so to deal with it,

Repertoire - that the factory might have prospects.



HANNOVERSCHE NEUE PRESSE (03.02.1982)
...Are here (Henze) the instrumental skills of each individual required down to the last, so this also applies to Dieter Acker Symphony recorded with great audience approval. (R.Hollmann)



THE WORLD (04.02.1982)
...Arable composed, rather than against the Orchestra. He shares the nerve for the "language" of instruments and the compatibility or incompatibility of their characters with Berlioz and Strauss, without however in the programmatic or illustrative. But he has the audience in mind: this may is lucky, not only to read musical progressions and developments, but also listening to play with. (Lesle)



STUTTGARTER ZEITUNG (17.02.1982)
The world, the he (Acker) builds by symphonic means is not a degradation product (Kirchner / Symphony), but original. Acker's three-movement Symphony works with shapes, figures and gestures, which are observable birth and growth: triumph of the goethean development idea, which for decades was faded in the rigging of serial predisposition, specific solidification or full-field condition descriptions. The records a story ever own by Red threads and no longer impose the listeners as he can retain and recognize. (Lutz.L)



WUPPERTAL NEWSPAPER (08.10.1979)
First Symphony by Dieter Acker ...die was heard in an impressive interpretation: she a Mahlerian intensity music demonstrated... a work with the field has reached a stage of unzweifel-cash Cup.



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on March 18, 2014, 06:00:42 pm
Music of Johann Cilensek
(http://www.hermsdorf-regional.de/persoenlichkeiten/cilensek/grafik-johann-cilensek-g.jpg)

From the collection of Karl Miller

Concert Piece for Flute and Orchestra
Richard Varga, flute
Berlin Symphony Orchestra/Gunther Herbig

Radio broadcast, date unknown

Bio from Qwika.com-- machine translation
 Johann Cilenšek (* 4. December 1913 in Grossdubrau; † 14. December 1998) was a German composer and university teacher as well as a vice-practitioner of the academy of the arts of the GDR.

Johann Cilenšek was born 1913 as a son of a porcelain turner in the Saxonian Grossdubrau ( close Bautzen) and visited from 1924 to 1933 the high school in Bautzen. 1933 it was committed to 1934 in the porcelain factory Hermsdorf to the realm work service and worked. it studied 1935 to 1939 at church-musical Institut in Leipzig with Johann Nepomuk David (composition) and Friedrich Högner (organ). it joined 1937 the NSDAP . From beginning of war 1939 to end of war 1945 it was conscripted as Schleifer and turners.

1945 joined Cilenšek of the KPD and 1946 the SED . He became a teacher and 1947 professor for clay/tone set and composition at the Thuringian national conservatoire. It was 1951 to 1956 and 1964 to 1966 of chairmen of the regional organization Thuringia of the federation of German composers, in addition since 1961 member of the academy of the arts. Starting from 1966 it was as successors of Werner Felix Rektor of the university for music Franz Liszt Weimar until 1972. 1978 he became vice-practitioner of the academy of the arts. Cilenšek emeritierte 1980.

It received the national price and 1983 the patriotic earnings/service medal to 1970.

Cilenšek composed five symphonies, piano concerts, a concert for organ and caper orchestra, concerts for solo instruments and orchestra, silhouettes for 15 solo strike ago, a mosaic for large caper orchestra, Sonaten, choir works and songs.



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on March 18, 2014, 06:10:21 pm
Eduard Erdmann: Rhapsody and Rondo(1946)
(http://claude.torres1.perso.sfr.fr/ExilBerlin/ErdmannEduard/ErdmannEduard5.jpg)

From the collection of Karl Miller


Rhapsody and Rondo (Concertino) for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 18
Paul Baumgartner, piano
Hannover Radio Symphony Orchestra/Willy Steiner
This work was dedicated to Paul Baumgartner, who also played in the work's premiere in 1948.


Wikipedia Bio:

Eduard Erdmann (5 March 1896 – 21 June 1958) was a Baltic German pianist and composer.

Erdmann was born in Wenden (Cēsis) in the Governorate of Livonia. He was the great-nephew of the philosopher Johann Eduard Erdmann. His first musical studies were in Riga, where his teachers were Bror Möllersten and Jean du Chastain (piano) and Harald Creutzburg (harmony and counterpoint). From 1914 he studied piano in Berlin with Conrad Ansorge and composition with Heinz Tiessen. In the 1920s and early 1930s his name was frequently cited among Germany's leading composers. Moreover, Erdmann had an international reputation as an outstanding concert pianist whose repertoire encompassed Beethoven and the advocacy of contemporary music. In 1925, he gave the premiere of Artur Schnabel's Piano Sonata, at the Venice ISCM Festival.[1]

From 1925 he was professor of piano at the Cologne Academy of Music but was forced to resign from his post by the Nazis in 1935 and became an 'inner exile', composing almost nothing until after the end of World War II. He joined the Nazi Party in 1937; while not in sympathy with National Socialism, his decision was to avoid government harassment so that he could continue to work, like several other German musicians at the time. This action ruined his post-war reputation, and it did not recover in his lifetime.[2] He resumed teaching as Professor of Piano at the Hochschule für Musik in Hamburg in 1950, but died of a heart-attack in 1958. His students at Hamburg included Aloys and Alfons Kontarsky. There has been little revival of interest in his own music and all his post-World War II works remain in manuscript; considering his inter-war eminence, he has received remarkably little attention up to the present day, but in 2006 the cpo label began issuing a series of CDs of his orchestral works.

Erdmann came to critical notice as a composer with the sensational success of his First Symphony (dedicated to Alban Berg) in 1919. He was also close friends with Ferruccio Busoni's pupil Philipp Jarnach, as well as Ernst Krenek, Artur Schnabel and Emil Nolde. Like Tiessen and Schnabel, he was deeply impressed by Schoenbergian and Bergian Expressionism but did not adopt the twelve-note method, preferring a freely and often totally chromatic vocabulary with little or no sense of key. His total output is quite small, and surprisingly contains very little piano music: but it came to include four symphonies, Nos. 3 and 4 dating from after World War II and thus still unpublished (although the Third Symphony was recorded and released on the CPO label with the Capricci opus 21).[3] As early as 1920 Erdmann issued a credo in which he declared himself opposed to the extreme individualism in music from Ludwig van Beethoven to Arnold Schoenberg, and dedicated instead to the creation of a more objective music characterized by what he called the 'third-person forms' created by composers from Heinrich Schütz to Anton Bruckner.

Between 1921 and 1943, Erdmann often appeared with the Australian violinist Alma Moodie, who lived in Germany.[4] Erdmann dedicated his Sonata for Solo Violin, Op. 12 (1921) to her, and she premiered it in Berlin in October 1921.[5] The Australian-English critic Walter J. Turner wrote of a recital he heard them play in London in April 1934, ‘it was the best violin piano duo that I have ever heard’. Their last concert together was given on 4 March 1943, three days before Alma Moodie's death, when they were in the middle of the cycle of Beethoven sonatas.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on April 06, 2014, 09:45:33 pm
The link to the Meyer Sinfonia Concertante posted by Rainolf does not appear to be working. When I click on it I am directed to my own Mediafire account page.


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Rainolf on April 06, 2014, 11:43:28 pm
Thanks for your reply, Dundonnell!

I have modified the link. Does it work now? And is there such a problem with the link to Finke's Suite, too?



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: Dundonnell on April 07, 2014, 12:31:07 am
The Meyer link now works perfectly and the Finke download had no problem attached to it :)


Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on February 06, 2015, 07:32:44 pm
Klaus Pringsheim -- Concerto in C for Orchestra
(http://photos.geni.com/p13/de/0c/d2/73/53444839135399fe/30_clip_image005_medium.jpg)

From the collection of Karl Miller


Concerto in C for Orchestra
Munich Philharmonic
Composer, Conductor
Date, venue unknown



Title: Re: German Music
Post by: jowcol on September 03, 2015, 03:46:16 pm
Under the "United States" composers downloads, I post a collection of Karl Miller's tracks of American Pianist Byron Janis's interpretation of  Richard Strauss's Burlesque.  Enjoy.