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Little-known music of all eras => Discussion of obscure composers => Topic started by: Dundonnell on May 01, 2018, 12:52:35 am



Title: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 01, 2018, 12:52:35 am
With the imminent release by Naxos of a cd containing David Diamond's Symphony No.6 I thought that I might revisit one of my lists.

I have excluded Alan Hovhaness (just too many!) and the withdrawn Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2 by Peter Mennin, Vincent Persichetti and William Schuman (although both Mennin's Second and Schuman's Second have been performed). John Harbison's Symphonies Nos. 4, 5 and 6 are available for digital download from the Boston Symphony Orchestra's website.

So-

Paul Creston: Symphony No.6 (1981)

David Diamond: Symphony No.7 (1959), Symphony No.9 (1985), Symphony No.10 (1989-2000) and Symphony No.11 (1989-92)

Vincent Giannini: Symphony No.1 (1950), Symphony No.2 (1955) and Symphony No.5 (1965)

Morton Gould: Symphony No.1 (1943) and Symphony No.6 (1983)

Roy Harris: Symphony No.10 (1965), Symphony No.12 (1968-69) and Symphony No.13 (1975-76)

George Rochberg: Symphony No.3 (1966-69), Symphony No.4 (1976) and Symphony No.6 (1986-87)

Christopher Rouse: Symphony No.5 (2016)

Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: Symphony No.5 (2008)


Fortunately almost all of these symphonies can be heard in off-air recordings although the sound quality of some leave a lot to be desired. In fact the only symphonies listed above which cannot be accessed in this way are Diamond's 11th, Giannini's 1st and the recent Christopher Rouse 5th which was premiered by the Dallas Symphony Orchestra in February 2017 and may therefore be around in someone's possession?  I would certainly like to see the missing Creston, Diamond, Rochberg and Zwilich on cd (the three Roy Harris are perhaps best ignored :-[)


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 02, 2018, 01:22:05 am
Arnold Rosner Symphony No. 6, plus one could argue No. 1 through 4 though they are considered juvenilia and not available.
Kevin Puts Symphony No. 1 (No. 2 through 4 are available)
Michael Hersch Symphony No. 3 (No. 1 and 2 are on Naxos but No. 3 I heard premiere...it isn't a pleasant listen)
Tomas Svoboda Symphony No. 2 to 6 (Symphony No. 1 is very impressive for an 18 year old composer and is commercially available)
My Symphony No. 1 and 2 (plus first three juvenilia symphonies since withdrawn) :)


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 02, 2018, 09:46:12 pm
I was restricting myself to established composers with whose music I am familiar but I ought to have included Rosner.

What is the music of Kevin Puts like?


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 03, 2018, 01:02:49 am
I was restricting myself to established composers with whose music I am familiar but I ought to have included Rosner.

What is the music of Kevin Puts like?

It is tonal, dramatic, colorful, with lots of elements of John Adams, Mahler, and Shostakovich. 
Some excerpts from his Pulitzer prize winning opera, Silent Night:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stOj2mp_oY8

Here is his very dramatic Symphony No. 2 (excuse that this audio is from the camera in the back of the hall rather than high fidelity):
https://youtu.be/leKKHXkI-nk?t=801

I was at the premiere and it was quite a devastating experience.  The ovation was instantaneous and thunderous.  The audience loves him.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 03, 2018, 02:51:32 pm
Thanks for this :) The Symphony No.2 is on a Naxos disc so I may investigate further.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 03, 2018, 03:46:35 pm
Thanks for this :) The Symphony No.2 is on a Naxos disc so I may investigate further.

Unfortunately, it isn't the greatest performance but should be good enough as an intro.  No. 4 is on Harmonia Mundi I believe. 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 03, 2018, 09:38:02 pm
Interestingly enough no sooner than I post my list than I find that Naxos will be releasing this next month:

https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8440554--harbison-symphony-no-4 (https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8440554--harbison-symphony-no-4)


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Vandermolen on May 11, 2018, 12:06:16 pm
This is an interesting thread. The later symphonies of Roy Harris interest me as do those of David Diamond. I'm looking forward to receiving his Sixth Symphony soon. I had a very nice email exchange with Arnold Rosner and was very sad to hear that he had passed away recently. I have enjoyed the releases featuring his music on Naxos. I'm tempted by Harbison's 4th Symphony, soon to be released on Naxox. I guess that even if Idont appreciate I'll hear another version of Ruggles's 'Sun Treader' which I've always liked. For me the most seriously under-recorded American composer is Ronald Lo Presti. The only thing I can find on CD is the powerful and moving 'The Masks' and I've heard some of his other works, including his tribute to practitioner Kennedy, which I found very moving.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: dhibbard on May 11, 2018, 04:10:11 pm
With the imminent release by Naxos of a cd containing David Diamond's Symphony No.6 I thought that I might revisit one of my lists.

I have excluded Alan Hovhaness (just too many!) and the withdrawn Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2 by Peter Mennin, Vincent Persichetti and William Schuman (although both Mennin's Second and Schuman's Second have been performed). John Harbison's Symphonies Nos. 4, 5 and 6 are available for digital download from the Boston Symphony Orchestra's website.

So-

Paul Creston: Symphony No.6 (1981)

David Diamond: Symphony No.7 (1959), Symphony No.9 (1985), Symphony No.10 (1989-2000) and Symphony No.11 (1989-92)

Vincent Giannini: Symphony No.1 (1950), Symphony No.2 (1955) and Symphony No.5 (1965)

Morton Gould: Symphony No.1 (1943) and Symphony No.6 (1983)

Roy Harris: Symphony No.10 (1965), Symphony No.12 (1968-69) and Symphony No.13 (1975-76)

George Rochberg: Symphony No.3 (1966-69), Symphony No.4 (1976) and Symphony No.6 (1986-87)

Christopher Rouse: Symphony No.5 (2016)

Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: Symphony No.5 (2008)


Fortunately almost all of these symphonies can be heard in off-air recordings although the sound quality of some leave a lot to be desired. In fact the only symphonies listed above which cannot be accessed in this way are Diamond's 11th, Giannini's 1st and the recent Christopher Rouse 5th which was premiered by the Dallas Symphony Orchestra in February 2017 and may therefore be around in someone's possession?  I would certainly like to see the missing Creston, Diamond, Rochberg and Zwilich on cd (the three Roy Harris are perhaps best ignored :-[)

Yes I am really looking forward to listening to the David Diamond release from Naxos.... I wonder if university orchestras are the only way we may hear unsung compositions... then I got out my Howard Hanson recordings and there was the  Eastman School of Music-Rochester Orchestra.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 12, 2018, 12:57:33 am
This is an interesting thread. The later symphonies of Roy Harris interest me as do those of David Diamond. I'm looking forward to receiving his Sixth Symphony soon. I had a very nice email exchange with Arnold Rosner and was very sad to hear that he had passed away recently. I have enjoyed the releases featuring his music on Naxos. I'm tempted by Harbison's 4th Symphony, soon to be released on Naxox. I guess that even if Idont appreciate I'll hear another version of Ruggles's 'Sun Treader' which I've always liked. For me the most seriously under-recorded American composer is Ronald Lo Presti. The only thing I can find on CD is the powerful and moving 'The Masks' and I've heard some of his other works, including his tribute to practitioner Kennedy, which I found very moving.

I too like Ronald LoPresti.  His symphonies are available on youtube however I think the point of this thread is more about symphonies not commercially available on CD even if they can be heard.  I find him to remind me of Ralph Vaughan Williams and some early Stravinsky.  There is a near quote of The Rite of Spring in his Symphony No. 1 second movement.  Sad he died so young. 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Vandermolen on May 12, 2018, 10:10:24 am
This is an interesting thread. The later symphonies of Roy Harris interest me as do those of David Diamond. I'm looking forward to receiving his Sixth Symphony soon. I had a very nice email exchange with Arnold Rosner and was very sad to hear that he had passed away recently. I have enjoyed the releases featuring his music on Naxos. I'm tempted by Harbison's 4th Symphony, soon to be released on Naxox. I guess that even if Idont appreciate I'll hear another version of Ruggles's 'Sun Treader' which I've always liked. For me the most seriously under-recorded American composer is Ronald Lo Presti. The only thing I can find on CD is the powerful and moving 'The Masks' and I've heard some of his other works, including his tribute to practitioner Kennedy, which I found very moving.

I too like Ronald LoPresti.  His symphonies are available on youtube however I think the point of this thread is more about symphonies not commercially available on CD even if they can be heard.  I find him to remind me of Ralph Vaughan Williams and some early Stravinsky.  There is a near quote of The Rite of Spring in his Symphony No. 1 second movement.  Sad he died so young. 
I meant 'practitioner' Kennedy above. I'm glad that you like Lo Presti too - a very fine composer. I wish that his symphonies at least were on a commercial CD although a kind Internet music friend did a CD copy for me.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Latvian on May 14, 2018, 09:17:50 pm
Your lists are invariably useful and interesting, Colin. It's great that you codify and disseminate what more often that not are random observations kicking around in the back of some of our minds! While I'm a completist at heart as well and would love to see many of these works recorded and more widely available in good sound and performances, I can at least offer forum members an opportunity to hear some of the works mentioned in your list and by others in this thread, that are not already here in our Downloads folder.

I have live performances of Kevin Puts' Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 and will be happy to upload them here if there's interest. I like his music and am glad that he's been getting more exposure in recent years. I believe I also have Tomas Svoboda's 4th & 6th Symphonies and Rouse's 5th Symphony.

On the matter of withdrawn symphonies, there is a private recording of Persichetti's First Symphony, in a rehearsal reading with Howard Hanson and his Eastman students. Let's also remember that Diamond wrote an early, withdrawn symphony, which is on YT.

While I try very hard to be fair, open-minded and judicious in my comments on most music and musicians, I regret that Roy Harris' 13th Symphony strikes me as an embarrassment richly deserving its oblivion. I say this having great respect for Harris' music in general and fondness for many of his works. I suppose that a more professional performance than the one on YT might possibly present the work in a better light, but I'm not sure there's much there worth salvaging regardless of the quality of the performance or recording. After hearing all the other Harris symphonies and wondering why the 13th hadn't surfaced, when it finally did the reason was quite obvious, disappointingly so.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 14, 2018, 11:42:53 pm
I cannot but agree with you, Maris, regarding the Roy Harris. It is really pretty dreadful and it was a terrible disappointment to me when I first heard it

I should be taking delivery of the Kevin Puts Symphony No.2 and the Diamond No.6 tomorrow but of the others you mention the one which I would most like to hear is the Christopher Rouse No.5. If you can make it available I would be most grateful


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Toby Esterhase on May 14, 2018, 11:58:24 pm
Hillmar Luckhardt but it seems quite difficult


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 15, 2018, 01:21:23 am
Your lists are invariably useful and interesting, Colin. It's great that you codify and disseminate what more often that not are random observations kicking around in the back of some of our minds! While I'm a completist at heart as well and would love to see many of these works recorded and more widely available in good sound and performances, I can at least offer forum members an opportunity to hear some of the works mentioned in your list and by others in this thread, that are not already here in our Downloads folder.

I have live performances of Kevin Puts' Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 and will be happy to upload them here if there's interest. I like his music and am glad that he's been getting more exposure in recent years. I believe I also have Tomas Svoboda's 4th & 6th Symphonies and Rouse's 5th Symphony.

On the matter of withdrawn symphonies, there is a private recording of Persichetti's First Symphony, in a rehearsal reading with Howard Hanson and his Eastman students. Let's also remember that Diamond wrote an early, withdrawn symphony, which is on YT.

While I try very hard to be fair, open-minded and judicious in my comments on most music and musicians, I regret that Roy Harris' 13th Symphony strikes me as an embarrassment richly deserving its oblivion. I say this having great respect for Harris' music in general and fondness for many of his works. I suppose that a more professional performance than the one on YT might possibly present the work in a better light, but I'm not sure there's much there worth salvaging regardless of the quality of the performance or recording. After hearing all the other Harris symphonies and wondering why the 13th hadn't surfaced, when it finally did the reason was quite obvious, disappointingly so.

Wow, a treasure trove!  Please upload Kevin Puts' symphony No. 1.  I have Marin Alsop's fantastic west coast premiere with the Cabrillo Festival Orchestra that I was present at of No. 2.  I also want Tomas Svoboda's 4th and 6th, and Rouse's 5th.  Coincidentally, I am listening to his No. 4 at this very moment.  I would also love Rouse's Organ Concerto which I heard live by the LA Phil and it was fantastic if you have it. 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Latvian on May 16, 2018, 09:49:42 pm
Yes, I do have the Rouse Organ Concerto. Please give me some time to work on this, but I will gladly upload all the requests when I can -- I've been having severe problems with my laptop.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 17, 2018, 12:50:38 am
Yes, I do have the Rouse Organ Concerto. Please give me some time to work on this, but I will gladly upload all the requests when I can -- I've been having severe problems with my laptop.

Awesome!  Waiting patiently  ;D 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 23, 2018, 02:49:48 pm
Listening, in considerable astonishment, to Kevin Puts's Second Symphony it occurs to me that if the composer had produced this in the early 60s in an American university music school he would have suffered the same fate as Arnold Rosner. His teachers would have utterly rejected the music as unacceptably over-emotional with a ridiculously old-fashioned approach to an outmoded reliance on beauty of utterance.

How the world has changed that music like this is performed by a music conservatory orchestra under a leading conductor when the music of those who condemned and rejected Rosner is, if not forgotten, no longer the Only acceptable music permitted a hearing!!

....and Puts is chair of the Peabody composition faculty rather than being driven into suburban New York obscurity (like Rosner)

My deepest thanks for bringing it to my attention! This is what participation in a music forum is for!!


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on May 23, 2018, 03:30:00 pm
Listening, in considerable astonishment, to Kevin Puts's Second Symphony it occurs to me that if the composer had produced this in the early 60s in an American university music school he would have suffered the same fate as Arnold Rosner. His teachers would have utterly rejected the music as unacceptably over-emotional with a ridiculously old-fashioned approach to an outmoded reliance on beauty of utterance.

How the world has changed that music like this is performed by a music conservatory orchestra under a leading conductor when the music of those who condemned and rejected Rosner is, if not forgotten, no longer the Only acceptable music permitted a hearing!!

....and Puts is chair of the Peabody composition faculty rather than being driven into suburban New York obscurity (like Rosner)

My deepest thanks for bringing it to my attention! This is what participation in a music forum is for!!

Puts is also a very good public representative of contemporary music.  The public adores him and he is frequently commissioned by patrons.  Despite his academic skills (he has a doctorate in composition and studied at the finest music conservatories in America), he is tall and athletic and friendly.  Basically, doesn't fit the old loner weirdo stereotypes of what some think a composer would be.  I've been fortunate to hang out with him on occasions including rehearsals of some of his premieres.  We went for a walk after the rehearsal and he had absolutely no ego, was fully curious in my musical experiences and very engaging.  I'm a huge fan of the person as well as the music he creates.  I met him for the first time back in 2002 when he was quite unknown but his music was searing and powerfully moving.  Marin Alsop was a huge fan of his already and he taught at the school I graduated from.  He was quite young (I believe 30 years old back then) and brilliant and I love everything he's written. 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 23, 2018, 04:16:02 pm
Well, if only the basis of the Naxos disc,he has gained a new admirer in me


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: kyjo on June 04, 2018, 08:26:50 pm
Puts is also a very good public representative of contemporary music.  The public adores him and he is frequently commissioned by patrons.  Despite his academic skills (he has a doctorate in composition and studied at the finest music conservatories in America), he is tall and athletic and friendly.  Basically, doesn't fit the old loner weirdo stereotypes of what some think a composer would be.  I've been fortunate to hang out with him on occasions including rehearsals of some of his premieres.  We went for a walk after the rehearsal and he had absolutely no ego, was fully curious in my musical experiences and very engaging.  I'm a huge fan of the person as well as the music he creates.  I met him for the first time back in 2002 when he was quite unknown but his music was searing and powerfully moving.  Marin Alsop was a huge fan of his already and he taught at the school I graduated from.  He was quite young (I believe 30 years old back then) and brilliant and I love everything he's written. 

Great to read - thanks for sharing. I heard Puts’ Lento assai for string quartet (based on the slow movement of Beethoven’s op. 135) performed live a couple years ago - a very moving work. I see he has written a cello concerto which I’d very much like to hear!


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on June 05, 2018, 01:03:05 am
Puts is also a very good public representative of contemporary music.  The public adores him and he is frequently commissioned by patrons.  Despite his academic skills (he has a doctorate in composition and studied at the finest music conservatories in America), he is tall and athletic and friendly.  Basically, doesn't fit the old loner weirdo stereotypes of what some think a composer would be.  I've been fortunate to hang out with him on occasions including rehearsals of some of his premieres.  We went for a walk after the rehearsal and he had absolutely no ego, was fully curious in my musical experiences and very engaging.  I'm a huge fan of the person as well as the music he creates.  I met him for the first time back in 2002 when he was quite unknown but his music was searing and powerfully moving.  Marin Alsop was a huge fan of his already and he taught at the school I graduated from.  He was quite young (I believe 30 years old back then) and brilliant and I love everything he's written. 

Great to read - thanks for sharing. I heard Puts’ Lento assai for string quartet (based on the slow movement of Beethoven’s op. 135) performed live a couple years ago - a very moving work. I see he has written a cello concerto which I’d very much like to hear!

I really think this very much sums him up:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRSGjUC10kY

He understands students need to demonstrate technique but ultimately, your music really has to communicate directly and powerfully...genuinely and without compromise.  There might be a musical trend that everyone else is doing but that might not be true to you and you can't speak with that voice with honesty and authenticity that you will pursue and invest in.  With Puts, he is one of those voices that is very sincere and doesn't follow the trends.  He made me much more comfortable in my own voice just by how authentic he is being and his positive feedback towards my own music was so rewarding.  And the audiences just adore him.  I've heard him at concerts that included multiple living composers and the reception he gets is off the charts positive.  I'm not talking about him now as a famous Pulitzer prize winning composer but 15 years ago when only his music represented him.  Immediately long standing ovations that were very sincere with loads of people waiting to meet him sort of stuff.  He eclipsed the others every time he had a work performed.  On top of that, he is a great guy and without ego.  I wish I studied under him but we're the same age so he was at my uni after I had already graduated.  Now he is faculty at Peabody along with Chris Rouse.  Keep him on your watch list.  I love all he has done.  "Credo" for string quartet is so beautiful. 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Vandermolen on June 13, 2018, 12:30:00 pm
Thanks for this :) The Symphony No.2 is on a Naxos disc so I may investigate further.

It sounds v interesting. I've asked my daughter to get it for me for my b'day.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Jolly Roger on November 28, 2018, 01:47:06 am
Listening, in considerable astonishment, to Kevin Puts's Second Symphony it occurs to me that if the composer had produced this in the early 60s in an American university music school he would have suffered the same fate as Arnold Rosner. His teachers would have utterly rejected the music as unacceptably over-emotional with a ridiculously old-fashioned approach to an outmoded reliance on beauty of utterance.

How the world has changed that music like this is performed by a music conservatory orchestra under a leading conductor when the music of those who condemned and rejected Rosner is, if not forgotten, no longer the Only acceptable music permitted a hearing!!

....and Puts is chair of the Peabody composition faculty rather than being driven into suburban New York obscurity (like Rosner)

My deepest thanks for bringing it to my attention! This is what participation in a music forum is for!!
As far as I'm concerned, the neglect of Arnold Rosner's music is criminal. There is a unique nobility to his music that makes him one of my favorites.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Greg K on November 28, 2018, 02:15:29 am
Is it neglected?  What's your criteria for that?


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: M. Yaskovsky on November 29, 2018, 10:52:36 am
Naxos will release a recording of Florence Price's 1st and 4th symphony https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8520012--florence-beatrice-price-symphonies-nos-1-4
Toccata will release a third volume of Arnold Rosner's symphonic music (incl symphony 6) https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8519661--arnold-rosner-orchestral-music-volume-three


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on November 29, 2018, 03:41:47 pm
Naxos will release a recording of Florence Price's 1st and 4th symphony https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8520012--florence-beatrice-price-symphonies-nos-1-4
Toccata will release a third volume of Arnold Rosner's symphonic music (incl symphony 6) https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8519661--arnold-rosner-orchestral-music-volume-three

Splendid news about the Rosner!!


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Vandermolen on December 02, 2018, 02:01:37 pm
Listening, in considerable astonishment, to Kevin Puts's Second Symphony it occurs to me that if the composer had produced this in the early 60s in an American university music school he would have suffered the same fate as Arnold Rosner. His teachers would have utterly rejected the music as unacceptably over-emotional with a ridiculously old-fashioned approach to an outmoded reliance on beauty of utterance.

How the world has changed that music like this is performed by a music conservatory orchestra under a leading conductor when the music of those who condemned and rejected Rosner is, if not forgotten, no longer the Only acceptable music permitted a hearing!!

....and Puts is chair of the Peabody composition faculty rather than being driven into suburban New York obscurity (like Rosner)

My deepest thanks for bringing it to my attention! This is what participation in a music forum is for!!

Totally agree with you Colin. One of my 'discs of the year'.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Jolly Roger on January 08, 2019, 09:30:36 am
Is it neglected?  What's your criteria for that?
No one plays Rosner's music and less than a handful of his symphonies are available..



Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on January 08, 2019, 01:37:42 pm
Is it neglected?  What's your criteria for that?
No one plays Rosner's music and less than a handful of his symphonies are available..



The first part of your statement is-very sadly correct- but there are now four of his eight symphonies on disc and these are the four later, mature symphonies. Nos. 1-4, which have not been recorded, date from 1961-64 when Rosner was a student aged 16-19 years of age.

......and there are plans to record more of Rosner's music, including his very substantial Requiem of 1973.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on January 08, 2019, 04:15:32 pm
Is it neglected?  What's your criteria for that?
No one plays Rosner's music and less than a handful of his symphonies are available..



The first part of your statement is-very sadly correct- but there are now four of his eight symphonies on disc and these are the four later, mature symphonies. Nos. 1-4, which have not been recorded, date from 1961-64 when Rosner was a student aged 16-19 years of age.

......and there are plans to record more of Rosner's music, including his very substantial Requiem of 1973.

I understand that the juvenilia work either does not exist (destroyed by composer) or not in a performance state.  It sounded like we'll never get No. 1-4 or the first piano concerto.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on January 08, 2019, 05:01:46 pm
Since the earliest orchestral piece included in the List of Compositions on Rosner's website is the Piano Concerto No.2, op.30 (1965) I think that you are almost certainly correct.


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on January 09, 2019, 01:05:38 am
Since the earliest orchestral piece included in the List of Compositions on Rosner's website is the Piano Concerto No.2, op.30 (1965) I think that you are almost certainly correct.

I asked the moderator of the website about the early works and that is what he responded.  Surprisingly, he was the composer Carson Cooman. 


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on January 09, 2019, 02:11:35 am
Thank you for this information.

What this means is that in terms of the music Arnold Rosner wrote for full orchestra, ie excluding music for symphonic band or choral music. the unrecorded works are:

Partita for orchestra, op.33 (1966)
"Perchance to Dream" for orchestra, op.45 (1969)
"A MyLai Elegy" for orchestra, op.51 (1971)
Concerto Grosso No.2 for orchestra, op. 74 (1979)
Consort Music for orchestra, op.80 (1980)
"Transformations" for orchestra, op. 87 (1990)
Variations on a Theme by Frank Martin for orchestra, op. 105 (1996)
Concerto for harpsichord and strings, op. 113 (2000)

These could all be fitted onto two cds :)


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Jolly Roger on January 09, 2019, 07:56:37 am
I was restricting myself to established composers with whose music I am familiar but I ought to have included Rosner.

What is the music of Kevin Puts like?

Re Rosner..his music must be heard more often..it has a very noble elegant quality that makes it very endearing(to me,at least)


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: relm1 on January 09, 2019, 03:29:28 pm
Thank you for this information.

What this means is that in terms of the music Arnold Rosner wrote for full orchestra, ie excluding music for symphonic band or choral music. the unrecorded works are:

Partita for orchestra, op.33 (1966)
"Perchance to Dream" for orchestra, op.45 (1969)
"A MyLai Elegy" for orchestra, op.51 (1971)
Concerto Grosso No.2 for orchestra, op. 74 (1979)
Consort Music for orchestra, op.80 (1980)
"Transformations" for orchestra, op. 87 (1990)
Variations on a Theme by Frank Martin for orchestra, op. 105 (1996)
Concerto for harpsichord and strings, op. 113 (2000)

These could all be fitted onto two cds :)


What about the piano concerto or was that recorded?


Title: Re: (Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)
Post by: Dundonnell on January 09, 2019, 04:17:40 pm
Toccata disc: TOCC0368