The Art-Music Forum

Little-known music of all eras => Downloads discussion => Topic started by: ahinton on August 15, 2012, 12:24:11 pm



Title: French music
Post by: ahinton on August 15, 2012, 12:24:11 pm
Florent Schmitt (1870 to 1958) - String Quartet. in G opus 112 (1947):

From a wireless broadcast of a public concert; duration forty minutes. The energetic style of this long work recalls that of his (perhaps) best-known composition, the Psalm 47.
And a splendid work it is, too - but what about his Piano Quintet (1901-08), surely one of the finest works ever written for that medium?...


Title: Re: French music
Post by: A.S on August 15, 2012, 01:18:36 pm

   Hi Sydney,

   Thanks for upload of music by Florent Schmitt .  He is one of my favorite composer. I love some brilliant orchestra music by him. (Of course I like Psalm 47.)

  I will upload something recording from my collection soon :)    Atsushi


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Caostotale on August 15, 2012, 05:23:09 pm
Thanks very much for the Schmitt quartet.

It's interesting that, like his teacher Gabriel Fauré, Schmitt waited until considerably late in his career to compose an only string quartet. Looking over his works list, I'm very interested in checking out his earlier quartets for flutes, low brass, and saxophones.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 16, 2012, 01:45:47 am
Allow me to make my first posting to this site as this really wonderful work, the first of many I hope to be posting here from the collection of Karl Miller.


Tableaux Hindous by Jean Hubeau
(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/126s/26126443.jpg)

ORTF,  Conductor Eugene Bigot
Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown

From the collection of Karl Miller

WOW!!

I really, really, really love this work!  Of all of the esoteric ORTF broadcasts I've been posting over the last couple of weeks, this one is the winner!
It sounds to me like a very organic blend of late 19th century orientalism, early 20th Century impressionism, and a couple inspirational passages that Vaughan Williams or Bax would have approved of.  Wonderful orchestration, some haunting melodies.. I've been unable to listen to anything else for the last couple of days.


Wikipedia Bio:

Jean Hubeau (22 July 1917 – 19 August 1992) was a French pianist, composer and pedagogue.

Admitted at the age of 9 years to the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris, he studied composition with Paul Dukas, piano with Lazare Lévy, harmony with Jean Gallon, and counterpoint with Noël Gallon. He received a first prize in piano in 1930 at 13 years.

In 1934, he received the second Prix de Rome with his cantata The legend of Roukmani (first prize was awarded to Eugène Bozza). The following year, he was honored by Louis Diémer.

In 1941, when Claude Delvincourt was appointed director of the Conservatoire, Hubeau was appointed to the vacancy left by Delvincourt at the head of the Music Academy in Versailles. In addition, he took the post of professor of chamber music of the Paris Conservatory from 1957 to 1982 where he trained many students such as Jacques Rouvier, Géry Moutier, Olivier Charlier and Sonia Wieder-Atherton.

He was also a pianist known especially for his recordings of Gabriel Fauré, Robert Schumann and Dukas, which are recognized as benchmark versions.




Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 16, 2012, 02:19:20 am
4 Chansons de Ronsard by Darius Milhaud
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/39/Milhaud_Darius_1926.jpg/230px-Milhaud_Darius_1926.jpg)
J Micheau (sop)
ORTF, Conducted by C.M. Guilini
1959
Radio Broadcast

From the collection of Karl Miller

Milhaud may not be as 'unsung' as others, but certainly is worth a listen.  

Highlights from the Wiki Bio:

Darius Milhaud (French pronunciation: [daʁjys mijo]; 4 September 1892 – 22 June 1974) was a French composer and teacher. He was a member of Les Six—also known as The Group of Six—and one of the most prolific composers of the 20th century. His compositions are influenced by jazz and make use of polytonality. Darius Milhaud is to be counted among the modernist composers.[1]

Life and career
Born in Marseilles to a Jewish family from Aix-en-Provence, Milhaud studied in Paris at the Paris Conservatory where he met his fellow group members Arthur Honegger and Germaine Tailleferre. He studied composition under Charles Widor and harmony and counterpoint with André Gedalge. He also studied privately with Vincent d'Indy. As a young man he worked for a while in the diplomatic entourage of Paul Claudel, the eminent poet and dramatist, who was serving as French ambassador to Brazil.

On a trip to the United States in 1922, Darius Milhaud heard "authentic" jazz for the first time, on the streets of Harlem, [2] which left a great impact on his musical outlook. The following year, he completed his composition "La création du monde" ("The Creation of the World"), using ideas and idioms from jazz, cast as a ballet in six continuous dance scenes.[2]

In 1925, Milhaud married his cousin, Madeleine (1902–2008), an actress and reciter. In 1930 she bore him a son, the painter and sculptor Daniel Milhaud, to be the couple's only child.[3]

The rise of Nazism forced the Milhauds to leave France in 1939,[1][not in citation given] and then emigrate to America in 1940 (his Jewish background made it impossible for Milhaud to return to his native country until after its Liberation). He secured a teaching post at Mills College in Oakland, California, where he collaborated with Henri Temianka and the Paganini Quartet. In an extraordinary concert there in 1949, the Budapest Quartet performed the composer's 14th String Quartet, followed by the Paganini's performance of his 15th; and then both ensembles played the two pieces together as an octet.[4] The following year, these same pieces were performed at the Aspen Music Festival in Colorado, by the Paganini and Juilliard Quartet.[5]

The jazz pianist Dave Brubeck became one of Milhaud's most famous students when Brubeck furthered his music studies at Mills College in the late 1940s (he named his eldest son Darius). In a February 2010 interview with Jazzwax, Brubeck said he attended Mills, a women's college (men were allowed in graduate programs), specifically to study with Milhaud, saying "Milhaud was an enormously gifted classical composer and teacher who loved jazz and incorporated it into his work. My older brother Howard was his assistant and had taken all of his classes."[this quote needs a citation]

Milhaud's former students also include popular songwriter Burt Bacharach.[6] Milhaud told Bacharach, "Don't be afraid of writing something people can remember and whistle. Don't ever feel discomfited by a melody".[7]

Milhaud (like his contemporaries Paul Hindemith, Gian Francesco Malipiero, Alan Hovhaness, Bohuslav Martinů and Heitor Villa-Lobos) was an extremely rapid creator, for whom the art of writing music seemed almost as natural as breathing. His most popular works include Le bœuf sur le toit (a ballet which lent its name to the legendary cabaret frequented by Milhaud and other members of Les Six), La création du monde (a ballet for small orchestra with solo saxophone, influenced by jazz), Scaramouche (for saxophone and piano, also for two pianos), and Saudades do Brasil (dance suite). His autobiography is titled Notes sans musique (Notes Without Music), later revised as Ma vie heureuse (My Happy Life).

From 1947 to 1971 he taught alternate years at Mills and the Paris Conservatoire, until poor health, which caused him to use a wheelchair during his later years (beginning sometime before 1947), compelled him to retire. He died in Geneva, aged 81.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 16, 2012, 04:12:12 pm
Cello Concerto by Claude Pascal

Andre Navarra (soloist)
Office de Radiodiffusion-Télévision Française (ORTF), Conducted by  R. Boutry
Radio Broadcast, May 5, 1967

From the collection of Karl Miller


Brief Bio from "Last-FM"
Claude Pascal: French composer, singer, and a critic. His formal name is Claude René Georges Pascal. He was born in Paris on 19th of Feb. 1921. In 1931 (then he was only 10 years old), he entered the Paris Conservatory of Music where he won the first prize for four times in 1937, 1940, 1942, and 1944. As a composer, he won the first prize of Prix de Rome in 1945 by his cantata ‘jokes of bootstrapping marchant’.

He was very active as a performer such that he was selected as a cast of Yniold in Debussy’s opera Pelleas and Melisande and appeared on the stage of the Champs d’Elysees opera house when he was only 12 years old, as well as he was appointed as a chorus master of the opera comic theatre of Paris in 1944-1945. In addition, he obtained a success as a educator such as becoming a professor in reed instruments at Paris conservatory in 1952, where he also became the head in 1966. He wielded his pen as a critic on a journal Le Figgaro from 1970.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 16, 2012, 04:41:51 pm
Roger Calmel, Concerto pour Orgue(incomplete)
(http://www.leducation-musicale.com/newsletters/Varia0108_fichiers/image006.jpg)
P. Cochereau (Orgue)
ORtF, Conducted by G. Tzipine
Feb, 18, 1970

From the collection of Karl Miller


I would characterize this as a fairly "rugged" work- reminding me in some ways of Copeland's Symphony for Organ. Unfortunately, the recording is incomplete, but is sounds like nearly all of it is here.


Wikipedia  Bio for Calmel

Roger Calmel (13 May 1920 - 4 July 1998) was a French composer. His nearly 400 works span every genre, from chamber music to opera.

Originally from the Languedoc, he undertook his first musical studies in Béziers, in particular with Paul Fouquet.

In 1944, he moved to Paris to study composition at the César Franck school, before entering the Paris conservatory and winning first prize in several classes as of Counterpoint and Fugue (Plé-Claussade Class), Aesthetic class (Oliveir Messiaen class) and Composition class (Darius Milhaud class). His training benefited also from Pierre Shaeffer's influence.
The next few years witness the birth of his first major works. His personal musicality stood up through an atonal essence language that renounces neither polytonality nor tonal pivot usage.

He won the Musical Grand Prize of Paris (1958), the First Prize of the Concerts-Réferendum-Pasdeloup, the First Prize of the French musical confederation (1959), the Grand Prize of the Divonne Composition International Competition (1960), and the Grand Prize of the French Institute of chamber music (1976).

For many years Roger Calmel taught at French Radio and Television children's choir school, before becoming the head of the Darius Milhaud music conservatory in the XIVth arrondissement in Paris.

From 1991 to 1998, he worked as an inspector in Ateliers Musicaux for the Paris council. Those pedagogic activities had, without any doubts, an influence on the musician's career. Since then, and following the requests made by the "A Coeur joie" movement, Pueri Cantores and many other festivals and choirs, he spent a large part of his time writing several works based on vocal music.

Over many years, he also acted as artistic director of the Côte Languedocienne festival, a festival that he set up in Sérignan.





Title: Re: French music
Post by: Christo on August 17, 2012, 12:18:34 am
So many new pieces and new composers! Really too interesting, too convincing, too much (for me)!  ;) I'll download them all and do my best.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 17, 2012, 03:33:05 am
So many new pieces and new composers! Really too interesting, too convincing, too much (for me)!  ;) I'll download them all and do my best.

Fasten your seatbelt.  We're still in low gear....


Title: Re: French music
Post by: kyjo on August 17, 2012, 03:38:06 am
If this means there are going to be lots of unsung downloads on the way, my seatbelt's fastened ;D ;D!


Title: Details about the performers for the string quartets of d'Indy / Schmitt
Post by: mjkFendrich on August 17, 2012, 09:08:03 am
Thanks to the intro for the Schmitt quartet I've been able to find out some details about the
performances of this neglected work and for the d'Indy - they originate from broadcasts of
a series of fascinating concerts at the Musée d'Orsay, Paris from 2008:


Quatuor Renoir
Vincent d'Indy
Quatuor n° 3 op. 96
Henri Dutilleux
Quatuor "Ainsi la nuit"
 
sam. 29 mars 2008 - 11h00
Musée d'Orsay
Auditorium niveau -2


Quatuor Debussy
Florent Schmitt
Quatuor en sol dièse mineur op. 112
 
sam. 12 avril 2008 - 14h00
Musée d'Orsay
Auditorium niveau -2



see http://www.musee-orsay.fr/fr/evenements/musique/presentation-generale/article/radio-france-9537.html?cHash=c992108e0b (http://www.musee-orsay.fr/fr/evenements/musique/presentation-generale/article/radio-france-9537.html?cHash=c992108e0b)
for the full programme.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 17, 2012, 01:40:13 pm
Music of Maurice Thiriet
(http://claude.torres1.perso.sfr.fr/GhettosCamps/Stalags/Thiriet/ThirietMaurice1.jpg)

1-4: Oedipe Roi (1940-41)
Orchestre National de l'ORTF
Choeurs de l'ORTF (Jean Paul Kreder)
Conducted by Manuel Rosenthal
Christiane Eda Pierre, soprano
Franz Pietri, baryton
André Falcon, récitant
Radio Broadcast, January 31, 1972


5. Poem for Orchestra (1936)
ORTF, Conducted by Andre Girard
Radio broadcast, March 12, 1971


From the collection of Karl Miller


Wikipedia Bio
Born in Meulan, Yvelines, he entered the Paris conservatory in 1925 to study counterpoint and fugue with Charles Koechlin and orchestration and arrangement under Alexis Roland-Manuel. He graduated in 1931. During the forties Thiriet carved his career within film music, inspired by fellow composer Maurice Jaubert (who died in World War II), and wrote something like twenty scores from 1942 to 1960. Apart from his film work, Thiriet also composed several concert works, including a Flute concerto, ten ballets and two operas. His style, which was influenced by Jaubert and Roland-Manuel, is characterized by taught construction and modest, nearly impressionistic harmonization and often bears a classical grace not unlike that of Francis Poulenc and Jean Françaix.


Bio blurb from: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCkQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fclaude.torres1.perso.sfr.fr%2FGhettosCamps%2FStalags%2FThiriet%2FThirietMaurice.html&ei=MzsuUJqBI-f5ygG0zYBo&usg=AFQjCNEAbqkTxl2_b16jd7PFcCJmRNd2mQ&sig2=xOnDLIvp1xVQvJjFrr6SaA (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCkQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fclaude.torres1.perso.sfr.fr%2FGhettosCamps%2FStalags%2FThiriet%2FThirietMaurice.html&ei=MzsuUJqBI-f5ygG0zYBo&usg=AFQjCNEAbqkTxl2_b16jd7PFcCJmRNd2mQ&sig2=xOnDLIvp1xVQvJjFrr6SaA)

A French composer (especially in music for films). He was born in Meulan (Île-de-France, Yvelinnes) on 2 of May 1906. He entered Paris Conservatory in 1925 to study counterpoint and fugue under Charles Koechlin, orchestration, arrengement and aesthetics under Alexis Roland-Manuel whereas studying solfege under Schwartz, harmony under Silver. He graduated there in 1931. He admired Maurice Jaubert (frontier of movie music) highly, and devoted himself to the genre with influence of Jaubert. In the years 1941-42, he was prisonnier in Stalag IX A. His first success in the genre started from 1942. He composed the film music of 'Les Visiteurs du Soir' which was directed by Marcel Carné in 1942, with the collaboration of Joseph Kosma (composer of a famous jazz standard 'autumn leaves') . That obtained a great success. He and the director's next collaborattion 'Les Enfants du Paradis' in 1945 also achieved a successful outcome. Although he was largely recognized as one of the most distinguished composers of movie music in the era, he left many composition in regular classical music format. His compositional diction can be characterized as firm and tight construction in form with modest, colorful and somewhat impressionistic harmonization. He died in Puys at 66 years old on 28th of September, 1972.


Title: Re: Details about the performers for the string quartets of d'Indy / Schmitt
Post by: Caostotale on August 17, 2012, 06:07:58 pm
Vincent d'Indy
Quatuor n° 3 op. 96

More than 30 years separate d'Indy's Second String Quartet (1897) from his Third, composed over 1928-1929 as he passed his 78th birthday. Between the Violin Sonata (1903-1904) and the Piano Quintet (1924), apart from a few small pieces and arrangements, d'Indy composed no chamber music, being preoccupied with administrative duties at his music school, the Schola Cantorum -- funded with his fortune and for which he wrote the course -- and composition of his musical testament, La Légende de Saint Christophe (1908-1915), into which he crammed his medievalism, his Catholicism, his enormous erudition, his bigotry and anti-Semitism, and his loathing for the rising tide of Modernism. The preceding quartets, challenged by the prestige the form commanded owing to Beethoven's spate of masterpieces, evinced a preoccupation with form, compensating for a habitual absence of melodic afflatus, constricting the unusual lyricism of the First and generating a curious aridity in the monothematic Second. With the death of his wife in 1905, d'Indy's already highly organized approach to composition took on a systematic rigidity and chef d'école self-consciousness as his general outlook soured. The attendant heaviness began to dissipate only toward the end of the Great War when a chance encounter with a sympathetic young woman, Caroline Janson, took a romantic turn leading to marriage in 1920 and that amazing series of late masterpieces attesting a puissant rejuvenation -- the scintillant Poème des ravages, its companion Diptyque méditerranéen for orchestra, and a half-dozen chamber works rife with joy, the Third Quartet among them. It is not that d'Indy has become a fetching melodist in his old age -- his themes are serviceable rather than memorable -- but supreme technique is animated by potent feeling, the return of his considerable charm, and a generally relaxed geniality. It was no longer necessary for every new work to be an audacious coup de maître, though the Third Quartet qualifies. From the opening bars there is lift, cordiality -- ecstasy, even -- managed by a master hand. The welcoming mien is confirmed by a two-page notice explicative prefacing the score in which the work's formal design is spelled out -- after a brief introduction a compact sonata first movement, passionate yet smiling; a candid Intermède set off by a trio of ravishing tendresse; a slender theme becoming ever more persuasive through seven brief but elaborate variations; and a rondo finale with five refrains leading through nostalgia-laced joy to a triumphant peroration. The Quatuor Calvet gave the premiere at a Société Nationale concert on April 12, 1930.  ~ Adrian Corleonis, allmusic.com

Florent Schmitt
Quatuor en sol dièse mineur op. 112

I could not find any dialogue on this work, outside of a brief (but nondescript) mention in a letter from Jean Roger-Ducasse to Nadia Boulanger that coincided with the work's premiere at the Strasbourg Festival on June 10, 1948. Elsewhere, Schmitt's quartet is mentioned in the same breath as Roger-Ducasse's second quartet, which was completed at around the same time as Schmitt's.

I don't speak French, otherwise I'd attempt translation of the radio introduction.

Like Roger-Ducasse's work, the Schmitt quartet is simply massive to behold. It's a shame that this work is so unknown. Based on the biographical information I've found, it would seem that, by the 1940s, Schmitt had managed to piss off almost everybody with thorny critical writings and bad behavior at performances. As none of that stuff matters anymore, I'm certainly going to spend some time examining this work, as its appeal to me is both immediate and delightfully mysterious (very much akin to the way I react to Faure's music). The 130-odd page score is unfortunately still under copyright restrictions at IMSLP.org, but it's probably not a very hard one to find.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 18, 2012, 11:14:33 am
Divertimento by Henri Barraud
(http://www.classical-composers.org/img/barraud.jpg)

ORTF, Cond. B Haitink
Radio Broadcast, Sept 13, 1964

From the collection of Karl Miller


Wikipedia Bio


Wikipedia
Henry Barraud (sometimes Henri) (23 April 1900 – 28 December 1997) was a French composer.

He was born in Bordeaux. He was a student of Louis Aubert at the Conservatoire de Paris, but in 1927 failed to graduate, apparently because of his refusal to follow orthodox methods. Along with Pierre-Octave Ferroud and Jean Rivier, he helped to form the society Triton for the wider distribution of contemporary music.

After the Liberation of Paris in 1944, he was named the Director of Paris Radio, and later, in 1948, of what later became ORTF, a position he held until his retirement in 1965.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 18, 2012, 11:42:35 am
12 Inventions for 12 Players by Andre Jolivet
(http://www.biografiasyvidas.com/biografia/j/fotos/jolivet.jpg)

Ars Nova, conducted by Composer
Radio Broadcast, date unknown.

From the collection of Karl Miller

DISSONANCE ALERT


Note-- this work is one that I'd consider more dissonant/atonal then some of the others I've posted, and more than some of Jolivet's other works.  I'm planning to mark this separately on this forum so those of you who don't care for more dissonant works can avoid it.



Wikipedia Bio

André Jolivet (pronounced: [andʁe ʒɔlivɛ], 8 August 1905 – 20 December 1974) was a French composer. Known for his devotion to French culture and musical thought, Jolivet's music draws on his interest in acoustics and atonality as well as both ancient and modern influences in music, particularly on instruments used in ancient times. He composed in a wide variety of forms for many different types of ensembles.


Life and career
Born in Paris to artistic parents (one a painter, one a pianist), Jolivet was encouraged by them to become a teacher, going to teachers' college and teaching primary school in Paris (taking three years in between to serve in the military). However, he eventually chose to instead follow his own artistic ambitions and take up first cello and then composition. He first studied with Paul Le Flem, who gave him a firm grounding in classical forms of harmony and counterpoint. After hearing his first concert of Arnold Schoenberg he became interested in atonal music, and then on Le Flem's recommendation became the only European student of Edgard Varèse, who passed on his knowledge of musical acoustics, atonal music, sound masses, and orchestration. In 1936 Jolivet founded the group La jeune France along with composers Olivier Messiaen, Daniel-Lesur and Yves Baudrier, who were attempting to re-establish a more human and less abstract form of composition. La jeune France developed from the avant-garde chamber music society La spirale, formed by Jolivet, Messiaen, and Lesur the previous year.

Jolivet's aesthetic ideals underwent many changes throughout his career. His initial desire as an adolescent was to write music for the theatre, which inspired his first compositions, including music for a ballet. Claude Debussy, Paul Dukas and Maurice Ravel were to be his next influences after hearing a concert of their work in 1919; he composed several piano pieces while training to become a teacher before going to study with Le Flem. Schoenberg and Varèse were strongly evident in his first period of maturity as a composer, during which his style drew heavily upon atonality and modernistic ideas. Mana (1933), the beginning of his "magic period", was a work in six parts for piano, with each part named after one of the six objects Varèse left with him before moving to the United States. Jolivet's intent as a composer throughout his career was to "give back to music its original, ancient meaning, when it was the magical, incantatory expression of the religious beliefs of human groups." Mana, even as one of his first mature works, is a reflection of this; Jolivet considered the sculptures as fetish objects. His further writing continues to seek the original meanings of music and its capacity for emotional, ritual, and celebratory expression.

In 1945 he published a paper declaring that "true French music owes nothing to Stravinsky", though both composers drew heavily upon themes of ancient music in their work; Jolivet and La jeune France rejected neoclassicism in favour of a less academic and more spiritual style of composition. Later, during World War II, Jolivet shifted away from atonality and toward a more tonal and lyrical style of composition. After a few years of working in this more simplistic style, during which time he wrote the comic opera Dolorès, ou Le miracle de la femme laide (1942) and the ballet Guignol et Pandore (1943), he arrived at a compromise between this and his earlier more experimental work. The First Piano Sonata, written in 1945, shows elements of both these styles.

Finally realizing his youthful ambition to write for the theatre, Jolivet became the musical director of the Comédie Française in 1945, a post he held until 1959. While there he composed for plays by Molière, Racine, Sophocles, Shakespeare and Claudel, scoring 14 works in total. He also continued to compose for the concert hall, often inspired by his frequent travels around the world, adapting texts and music from Egypt, the Middle East, Africa and Asia into his distinctly French style.
 
During the 1950s and 1960s, Jolivet wrote several concertos for a variety of instruments including trumpet, piano, flute, harp, bassoon, percussion, cello, and violin. These works, while highly regarded, all demand virtuosic technical skill from the performers. Jolivet is also one of the few composers to write for the Ondes Martenot, an early electronic instrument, completing a concerto for it in 1947, 19 years after the instrument's invention. Jolivet founded the Centre Français d'Humanisme Musical at Aix-en-Provence in 1959, and in 1961 went to teach composition at the Paris Conservatoire. He died in Paris in 1974 aged 69, leaving unfinished his opera Le soldat inconnu.

Private life
Jolivet married twice, firstly violinist Martine Barbillion [1] in 1929. She bore him a daughter, Francoise-Martine (1930 - 2004). He remarried in 1933 Hilda Ghuighui (also spelt Guigue) (1906 - 1996) [2], who bore him three children, Pierre-Alain (1935 - 2005), Christine (b. 1940), and Merri (b. 1943). [3]













Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 19, 2012, 02:54:15 pm
Divertimento by Henri Barraud
(http://www.classical-composers.org/img/barraud.jpg)

ORTF, Cond. B Haitink
Radio Broadcast, Sept 13, 1964

From the collection of Karl Miller


Wikipedia
Henry Barraud (sometimes Henri) (23 April 1900 – 28 December 1997) was a French composer.

He was born in Bordeaux. He was a student of Louis Aubert at the Conservatoire de Paris, but in 1927 failed to graduate, apparently because of his refusal to follow orthodox methods. Along with Pierre-Octave Ferroud and Jean Rivier, he helped to form the society Triton for the wider distribution of contemporary music.

After the Liberation of Paris in 1944, he was named the Director of Paris Radio, and later, in 1948, of what later became ORTF, a position he held until his retirement in 1965.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Elroel on August 20, 2012, 10:57:35 am
Jowcol,

For me: go on with the "dissonants". Jolivet is stil a composer who wrote many modern, but listenable/enjoyable music.
And as  stated before: not the method, but the sounds makes the music. My listening habit is from the romantics to the more modern composers and back.

So thanks

Elroel


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Caostotale on August 20, 2012, 08:05:38 pm
Indeed. Thanks very much for the Jolivet. He's an endlessly fascinating composer.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 20, 2012, 08:40:12 pm
Jowcol,

For me: go on with the "dissonants". Jolivet is stil a composer who wrote many modern, but listenable/enjoyable music.
And as  stated before: not the method, but the sounds makes the music. My listening habit is from the romantics to the more modern composers and back.

So thanks

Elroel

I don't plan on holding back on the "dissonant" composers- but I thought it may help to label those which some people may not want to download if they prefer more  tonal works.  (Actually, in some cases, I think it is more of a lack of melodic lines than dissonance or a lack of tonality that some don't care fore. )  My listening habits are all over the map, and much outside of "classical music.)  I just like instrumental music that accomplishes what it sets to to do.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on August 21, 2012, 01:30:52 am
Whilst I might be disposed to argue whether Arthur Honegger was actually French or Swiss  ;D ;D  can I express my profound thanks for the upload of the Oratorio "Nicolas de Flue"-a work which, in all honesty, I had never even heard of :-[

How wonderful to get a new and substantial piece by a particularly fine composer :) :)


Title: Re: French music
Post by: guest54 on August 21, 2012, 02:55:04 am
Yes Mr. Dundonnell - isn't the ending simply magnificent!


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Elroel on August 21, 2012, 04:12:45 pm
Never heard Honegger's "Nicolas de Flue". Just found its name in some book on French modern music. Quite unbelievable why is not (better) known. It's a georgeous work, and yes the ending is the absolute top!
Thanks for the upload

Elroel


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 23, 2012, 04:19:57 pm
Music of Marcel Mihalovici
(http://claude.torres1.perso.sfr.fr/GhettosCamps/Clandestinite/FrontNationalDeLaMusique/MihaloviciMarcel/MihaloviciMarcel1964.jpg)

1. Scenes de Thesee
OTRF, Cond. J. Komives
Radio broadcast May, 18, 1968

2-4: Sinfonia Contata
D. Richardson (bar)
Choeurs + ORTF, cond. S. Baudo
Radio Broadcast April 19, 1967

From the collection of Karl Miller


The following is a repost of another work by Mihalovici from Unsung Composers


Aubade for Strings (Op. 89)
ORTF, Andre Girard, Cond.
Radio Broadcast
From the collection of Karl Miller



Wikipedia Bio

Marcel Mihalovici (Bucharest, 22 October 1898 – Paris, 12 August 1985) was a French composer born in Romania. He was discovered by George Enescu in Bucharest. He moved to Paris in 1919 (at age 21) to study under Vincent d'Indy. His works include his Sonata number 1 for violin and piano (1920), Mélusine opera (1920, libretto by Yvan Goll), his 1st string quartet (1923), 2nd string quartet (1931), Sonata number 2 for violin and piano (1941), Sonata for violin and cello (1944), Phèdre Opera (1949), Étude in two parts for piano and instrumental ensemble (1951) and Esercizio per archi (1960). Many of his piano works were first performed by his wife and renown concert pianist Monique Haas.

Mihalovici was the original composer for the music of Samuel Beckett's Cascando (1962). His Fifth Symphony features a soprano singing a setting of a Beckett poem, and he used Krapp's Last Tape as the basis for a small opera, Krapp, ou, La dernière bande. His memories of their friendship are recounted in the collected work Beckett at Sixty A Festschrift by John Calder, Calder and Boyars (1967).


Title: Re: French music
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 23, 2012, 09:14:47 pm
Never heard Honegger's "Nicolas de Flue". Just found its name in some book on French modern music. Quite unbelievable why is not (better) known. It's a georgeous work, and yes the ending is the absolute top!
Thanks for the upload

Elroel
Yes, definitely a winner, thanks !


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Caostotale on August 24, 2012, 05:42:29 am
Thank you so much for the Mihalovici works. Recordings of his work are definitely few and far between. Thanks also for using the Wikipedia page I contributed to. I assembled that page's opus list a few years back and have slowly been trying to gather scores of his work ever since.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: sensemayya on August 24, 2012, 09:51:12 am
Thank you!Mihailovici is a really UC,and his music is modernistic  but in a more modal language-the Thesee remindes  me a lot Enescu's Oedipe.Hope you have more Mihailovici in the vaults.I don't know if this should be here or in the Romanian section.
J


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on August 24, 2012, 10:49:05 am
Thank you!Mihailovici is a really UC,and his music is modernistic  but in a more modal language-the Thesee remindes  me a lot Enescu's Oedipe.Hope you have more Mihailovici in the vaults.I don't know if this should be here or in the Romanian section.
J

The Wiki page (see above) called him a French composer although Romanian by birth. 

I classified Tansman as Polish, even though he lived in France since he said he considered himself Polish even though he spoke French at home.  If we ever get a tagging system set up, we can classify a composer by more than one nationality.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Amphissa on August 28, 2012, 11:44:48 pm

A few works by Poulenc. Not much dissonance here. Some charm, some humor, some beauty.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: kyjo on September 19, 2012, 08:13:40 pm
Many thanks to rbert12 for his upload of Witkowski's "Mon Lac" :)! Being impressed by the disc of his dramatic, Franckian chamber music, I've been wanting to hear his orchestral music, which includes two symphonies ;D!


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on January 09, 2013, 11:55:15 am
Jean Francaix:  Music for 15 Soloists, Strings and Tympani (1988)
(http://www.yvongenealogie.fr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/FRANCAIX-Jean-francetv-fr.jpg)

Vienna Symphony Orchestra
Georges Pretre, Conductor
Radio broadcast data unknown

From the collection of Karl Miller

Note- the third track has a IV in the title tag.  It should be a III.   


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 12, 2013, 04:11:00 am
I should indicate that in uploading a number of pieces by Olivier Messiaen, in (I hope) radio broadcasts, I am not suggesting that I actually like most of Messiaen's music.

I do like the earliest orchestral music and the organ music(the last part of "La Nativite du Seigneur" is just about the most exciting music for organ I know and I have had the privilege of sitting beside an organist performing the work :)).

Later Messiaen however I do find very taxing and complex. I admire the composer's artistic integrity and deep religious conviction. It is entirely because I was so unfamiliar with this later music that I have been listening to it recently and thought that others might want to share that experience.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Latvian on January 13, 2013, 01:35:55 am
Thank you, Colin. I adore Messiaen's music on the whole, though I do find some of his works from the 1950s somewhat tough going. I share your appreciation for the early works, and I think his last works are really quite easy to digest. As for the organ music -- as an organist myself, I consider them magnificent. Right now I'm learning "Le banquet celeste" for a performance sometime this spring. And yes, "Dieu parmi nous" from "Nativite" is indeed one of the most impressive things anyone can ever hope to hear from an organ. In a cathedral it will transport you! Again, though, some of the organ music from the 1960s and 1970s is not immediately comprehensible to the ear.

Personally, in addition to the works mentioned, probably my favorite piece of Messiaen's is "Visions de l'Amen," for 2 pianos. Also, I love his "Des canyons aux etoiles." I don't list to it so much for structure or comprehension, rather for the color, imagination and sheer beauty of sounds he evokes in it. Impressionistic in a way.

Finally, I should mention that one of the most memorable musical moments in my life was meeting Messiaen backstage at Tanglewood, along with his wife, after they performed together in a concert of his works. A lovely, gracious couple.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 13, 2013, 01:42:50 am
That is both interesting and informative. Thanks :)

I had (temporarily) forgotten that the movement I was referring to was "Dieu parmi nous" :-[  It was-alas-not in a cathedral but in a very small church that I was treated to a performance, about 40 years ago now. Sitting next to the organist, who was and still is a very good friend, I marvelled as he spread his feet along the organ pedals to produce those quite gloriously exciting and dramatic sounds you will know so well :)


Title: Re: French music
Post by: lescamil on January 23, 2013, 10:24:15 pm
Thank you for the Messiaen. Is there any information on dates, performances venues, soloists, etc?

Olivier Messiaen(1908-92):

"Les Offrandes oubliee"(1930):

Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra(Lukasz Borowicz)


Continuing the feast of music by Olivier Messiaen:

"Hymne au Saint Sacrement"(1932):

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam(Mariss Jansons)



"Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum" for wind, brass and percussion(1964):

London Symphony Orchestra(Sir Simon Rattle)



"La Transfiguration de Notre Seigneur Jesus-Christ" for solo instruments, chorus and orchestra(1969):

BBC National Orchestra of Wales(Thierry Fischer)



Quadruple Concerto for Piano, Flute, Oboe, Cello and Orchestra(1991):

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra(Ilan Volkov)



"Eclairs sur l'Au-Dela"(1992):

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra(Ilan Volkov)





Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 23, 2013, 11:17:48 pm
"Hymne au Saint Sacrement", 28 August 2008, Royal Concertgebouw, Amsterdam

"Et exspector resurrectionem mortuorum", 7 March 2011, Barbican, London

"La Transfiguration de Notre Seigneur Jesus-Christ", Gerard Bouwhuis - piano,Adam Walker - flute,Julian Bliss - clarinet,Sonia Wieder-Atherton - cello,Colin Currie - xylophone,Adrian Spillett - marimba,Richard Benjafield - vibraphone. Philharmonia Voices.BBC Symphony Chorus, BBC National Chorus of Wales

.....is all I can add.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: lescamil on January 24, 2013, 08:28:19 am
After some research, I have come up with some info that I am fairly positive about (turns out I already had some of these, too):

Les offrandes oubliées

Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Lukasz Borowicz, conductor
Polska Orkiestra Radiowa, 2008 - 2009 season
Tuesday 24 November 2008, Lutoslawski Concert Studio, Warsaw


Concert à quatre

Cédric Tiberghien, piano
Emily Beynon, flute
Alexei Ogrintchouk, oboe
Danjulo Ishizaka, cello
BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Ilan Volkov, conductor
Prom 45, 19 August 2008


Éclairs sur l'au-delà

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Ilan Volkov, conductor
Edinburgh International Festival 2008, August 10, 2008


Title: Olivier Greif
Post by: Latvian on January 24, 2013, 07:14:24 pm
Quote
He hasn't been totally neglected, several of his chamber works are on disc, as well as his Cello Concerto "Durch Adam's Fall" played by Henri Demarquette and which has an mp3 download available on French retailers. I had recorded it played with the Riga Kamermusiki, Normunds Sne and Demarquette, but it doesn't seem complete, nor could I verify it was a concert recording.

It is indeed a concert recording -- I streamed it from Latvian Radio, probably around the same time you did. I'm quite sure mine is complete -- I can upload it if you want to compare with yours. An excellent work, and a fine composer, indeed.


Title: Re: French music - Olivier Greif
Post by: mjkFendrich on January 24, 2013, 08:29:50 pm
I've just uploaded a different live recording of Greif's cello concerto
with Jean-Guihen Queyras as soloist & Marc Minkowski as conductor.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: kyjo on January 24, 2013, 09:14:55 pm
Thanks for Greif's Cello Concerto! It's especially nice to hear an orchestral work of his since he concentrated mainly on chamber/vocal/instrumental music. His music has a harrowing emotional intensity that is quite rarely found in French music (not to say French music isn't emotional, it's just usually not as dark as Greif's music). His music often recalls Shostakovich (again rare for a French composer) in its dark anguish, but has a unique sound-world nonetheless. I especially enjoyed his Piano Trio, String Quartet no. 4 Ulysses and Sonate de Requiem for cello and piano. Unfortunately, most of the CDs of his music are quite hard to find now :(


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Latvian on January 25, 2013, 03:38:41 am
Quote
I've just uploaded a different live recording of Greif's cello concerto
with Jean-Guihen Queyras as soloist & Marc Minkowski as conductor.

Thank you!


Title: Re: French music
Post by: shamus on January 25, 2013, 03:57:24 am
Thanks to both Latvian and mjkfendrich--if I got that wrong, I have short term memory problems--I will indeed enjoy hearing the complete Cello Concerto. I would like to hear some of Greif's Choral/Orchestral works, but that seems unlikely somehow, unless someone has archival recordings. Jim


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Latvian on August 05, 2013, 05:28:18 pm
Quote
Jehan Alain (1911-1940)

When Alain was killed in combat in 1940 the orchestral partition was not finished, it was completed by Raymond Gallois-Montbrun (1918-1994)

Trois Danses pour orchestre (1939, organ version)
http://www.mediafire.com/?azkxq0fgdzcvz64
Orchestre Philharmonique de L'ORTF, Georges Tzipine conducting

From the archives of Radio France

I believe the link is to another work, which appears to be in four movements. A quick comparison to an organ recording of the Danses doesn't match up, either.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: autoharp on August 06, 2013, 10:30:33 pm
It's definitely not Trois Danses, nor is it by Alain!


Title: Re: French music
Post by: rbert12 on August 07, 2013, 12:18:01 am
I am sorry for the mistake, but the link is correct, the intro of the French Radio is for the Trois Danses, so I have no more information about this work. I have removed it.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Latvian on August 07, 2013, 01:51:52 pm
Perhaps we should repost the clip as a "mystery" item and see if anyone can identify it. It's interesting music, even if not by Alain!


Title: Re: French music
Post by: rbert12 on August 07, 2013, 02:56:23 pm
This music was from a program dedied to Raymond Gallois-Montbrun, so perhaps this limits a Little the scope of the mystery.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on February 25, 2014, 03:57:35 pm
Three French Piano Concerti
(http://hnnblogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/groupe1-300x205.jpg)



From the collection of Karl Miller




Francis Poulenc: Piano Concerto
(http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Lib-BIG/Poulenc-Francis-02.jpg)
Composer, Piano
ORTF/Charles Munch
1st European Perfomance
Radio Broadcast
[6 January 1950]
1. Allegretto
2. Andante con moto
3. Rondeau à la française

Description from Allmusic.com
This was the last of Poulenc's five concertos. While in the first fifteen years of his career Poulenc had made a reputation as a light-hearted composer, personal crises in the late 1930s awakened a dormant religious sensibility. Thereafter, including the war years, he had written music of considerably more seriousness of purpose, but even in them retained his lightness of touch and his ability to charm. After the war ended, restoring communication between Paris and America, the Boston Symphony Orchestra commissioned this piano concerto from Poulenc. It was premiered by that orchestra, conducted by Charles Munch on January 6, 1950, with the composer as soloist.

Now Poulenc returned, for this composition, to his earlier breezy style. The composition is in three movements, each smaller than the previous one; their lengths are about ten, five and a half, and four minutes. The piano is not treated as an individual protagonist against the orchestra, but as a part of the entire ensemble.

The concerto opens with the piano playing one of Poulenc's rhythmic ideas of faux gruffness, which is countered by a lovely tune on English horn. The slow second movement is tender, with a sense of some sadness, using a string melody introduced with softly marching rhythms in the horns. The finale is called Rondeau ˆ la Francaise and is in a very fast tempo. In one of the final episodes a tune appears which has been traced back to A la claire fontaine, an old sea chanty dating back to the time of Lafayette. Its first few notes are the same as that of Foster's song "Old Folks at Home" (or "Swanee River"), which some French commentators have mid-identified as a "Negro spiritual." Poulenc blends it, surprisingly, with a Brazilian maxixe rhythm.


Germaine Tailleferre: Piano Concerto in D (1924)
(http://www.organophon.de/images/Germaine-Tailleferre-Komponistin.jpg)
Penelope Thwaites, Piano
BBC Concerto Orchestra/Gregory Rose
Radio Broadcast.

1. Allegro
2. Adagio
3. Final. Allegro non troppo


Wikipedia Bio:

Germaine Tailleferre (French: [tɑjfɛʁ]; 19 April 1892 – 7 November 1983) was a French composer and the only female member of the group of composers known as Les Six.

She was born Marcelle Taillefesse at Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, Val-de-Marne, France, but as a young woman she changed her last name to "Tailleferre" to spite her father, who had refused to support her musical studies. She studied piano with her mother at home, composing short works of her own, after which she began studying at the Paris Conservatory where she met Louis Durey, Francis Poulenc, Darius Milhaud, Georges Auric and Arthur Honegger. At the Paris Conservatory her skills were rewarded with prizes in several categories. Most notably Tailleferre wrote 18 short works in the Petit livre de harpe de Madame Tardieu for Caroline Tardieu, the Conservatory’s Assistant Professor of Harp.

With her new friends, she soon was associating with the artistic crowd in the Paris districts of Montmartre and Montparnasse including the sculptor Emmanuel Centore who later married her sister Jeanne. It was in the Montparnasse atelier of one of her painter friends where the initial idea for Les Six began. The publication of Jean Cocteau's manifesto Le coq et l'Arlequin resulted in Henri Collet's media articles that led to instant fame for the group, of which Tailleferre was the only female member.

In 1923, Tailleferre began to spend a great deal of time with Maurice Ravel at his home in Monfort-L'Amaury. Ravel encouraged her to enter the Prix de Rome Competition. In 1925, she married Ralph Barton, an American caricaturist, and moved to Manhattan, New York. She remained in the United States until 1927 when she and her husband returned to France. They divorced shortly thereafter.

Tailleferre wrote many of her most important works during the 1920s, including her 1st Piano Concerto, the Harp Concertino, the ballets Le marchand d'oiseaux (the most frequently performed ballet in the repertoire of the Ballets suédois during the 1920s) and La nouvelle Cythère which was commissioned by Sergei Diaghilev for the ill-fated 1929 season of the famous Ballets Russes, and Sous les ramparts d'Athènes in collaboration with Paul Claudel, as well as several pioneering film scores, including B'anda, in which she used African themes.

The 1930s was even more fruitful, with the Concerto for Two Pianos, Choeurs, Saxophones and Orchestra, the Violin Concerto, the operas Zoulaïna and Le marin de Bolivar, and her masterwork, La cantate de Narcisse in collaboration with Paul Valéry. Her work in film music included Le petit chose by Maurice Cloche, and a series of documentaries.

At the outbreak of World War II, she was forced to leave the majority of her scores at her home in Grasse, with the exception of her recently completed Three Études for Piano and Orchestra. Escaping across Spain to Portugal, she found passage on a boat that brought her to the United States, where she lived the war years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After the war, in 1946, she returned to her home in France, where she composed orchestral and chamber music, plus numerous other works including the ballets Paris-Magie (with Lise Delarme) and Parisiana (for the Royal Ballet of Copenhaugen), the operas Il était un petit navire (with Henri Jeanson), Dolores, La petite sirène (with Philip Soupault, based on Hans Christian Andersen's story "The Little Mermaid") and Le maître (to a libretto by Ionesco), the musical comedy Parfums, the Concerto des vaines paroles, for baritone voice, piano and orchestra, the Concerto for Soprano and Orchestra, the Concertino for Flute, Piano and Orchestra, the Second Piano Concerto, the Concerto for Two Guitars and Orchestra, her Second Sonata for Violin and Piano, the Sonata for Harp, as well as an impressive number of film and television scores. The majority of this music was not published until after her death.

In 1976, she accepted the post of accompanist for a children's music and movement class at the École alsacienne, a private school in Paris. During the last period of her life, she concentrated mainly on smaller forms, due to increasing problems with arthritis in her hands. She nevertheless produced the Sonate champêtre for oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and piano, The Sonata for Two Pianos, Choral and Variations for Two Pianos or Orchestra, a series of children's songs (on texts by Jean Tardieu) and pieces for young pianists. Her last major work was the Concerto de la fidelité for coloratura soprano and orchestra, which was premièred at the Paris Opera the year before her death.

Germaine Tailleferre continued to compose right up until a few weeks before her death, on 7 November 1983 in Paris. She is buried in Quincy-Voisins, Seine-et-Marne, France.



Henri Barraud: Piano Concerto(1939)
(http://www.classical-composers.org/img/barraud.jpg)
1. Allegro
2. Andante
3. Finale
Alain Lefévre, Piano
ORTF/Manueal Rosenthal
Radio Broadcast


Wikipedia Bio:
Henry Barraud (sometimes Henri) (23 April 1900 – 28 December 1997) was a French composer.

He was born in Bordeaux. He was a student of Louis Aubert at the Conservatoire de Paris, but in 1927 failed to graduate, apparently because of his refusal to follow orthodox methods. Along with Pierre-Octave Ferroud and Jean Rivier, he helped to form the society Triton for the wider distribution of contemporary music.

After the Liberation of Paris in 1944, he was named the Director of Paris Radio, and later, in 1948, of what later became ORTF, a position he held until his retirement in 1965.
 




Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on February 26, 2014, 03:17:56 pm
Music of Jean-Michel Damase
(http://static.wixstatic.com/media/45b636_6175c7a3496aab8f4b65c15c12635549.jpg_srz_p_360_540_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srz)

From the collection of Karl Miller


Rameau Variations for Harpsichord and Orchestra(1966)
Robert Veyron-Lacroix, Harpsichord
ORTF/Andre Girard

Concertino for Harp and Strings (1951)

Performers and venue unknown

Serenade for Flute and Strings, Op. 36 (1956)
Composed at the Request of Jean-Pierre Rampal
James Dower, Flute
Langham Chamber Orchestra/Maurice Handford
Radio Broadcast


Introduction and Bio from www.chezdamase.com

 Born on 27 January 1928 and died 21 April 2013, Jean-Michel Damase composed in a style often compared to Fauré, Poulenc, Ravel, Françaix, Roussel, and Stravinsky; incorporating many of the rhythmic and harmonic complexities associated with twentieth-century French music. Throughout his career, Damase has remained a traditionalist, "continuing the post-tonal line of Debussy and Ravel without the modish interest in their deeper-seated implications."* Or, in the composers own words:​

Quote
"I prefer sincerity to forced innovation."

Damase's music is accessible without being lightweight; unapologetically melodic, with a penchant for repeating – some have even said "obsessive" – motifs; tonal, though paradoxically, harmonically complex; rhythmically surprising; sometimes playful, sometimes biting – but always resolving; respectful of tradition and form; often demanding virtuosic ability and endurance of the performer; and always superbly crafted.​


Born in 1928 in Bordeaux into a musical family, his mother being the renown harpist and musician Micheline Kahn, Jean-Michel Damase showed precocious musical talent. His studies began at an early age; when he was five he began the Samuel-Rousseau courses in piano and solfège.

Damase began composing at the age of nine. After Colette, his mother's friend, heard song settings of her poems, she wrote three "poèmes d'animaux" especially for him. When he was twelve, he became a pupil of Cortot at the École Normale de Musique de Paris, and in the next year he joined Armand Ferté’s piano classes at the Paris Conservatoire.

In 1943, he was unanimously awarded the Premier Prix in piano at the Conservatoire. Two years later he entered Henri Büsser's composition classes and began to study harmony and counterpoint with Dupré. At nineteen, he won the first prize in composition with his Quintet for flute, harp, violin , viola, and cello and his cantata Et la belle se réveilla won him the Prix de Rome. In the meantime, his career as a pianist was flourishing; he appeared as soloist in the Colonne and Conservatoire concerts and with the Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion et Télévision Française (l'ORTF).

Damase's youthful compositional maturity helped to foster a considerable technical facility and he has produced a great deal of music in a style that is attractive and elegant, remaining close to the traditions of the Conservatoire. All his works show deep knowledge of the possibilities of instruments, and his orchestration is rich, full and varied; evidenced most notably in the chamber and concertante works.

Damase has a great admiration for Fauré and Ravel. As a pianist, he has made award-winning recordings of many of their works. He is also great lover of ballet and a close friend of several leading choreographers. His first ballet score was La Croqueuse de diamants (The Gold Digger) written for Roland Petit and first produced at the Marigny Theatre in Paris. The complete ballet is also featured in the film Un, Deux, Trois, Quatre (1960)​.

After touring the world as a piano soloist and winning the Grand Prix du Disque for his recordings, Jean-Michel Damase has devoted his activities to composition and teaching. He serves on the boards of numerous international musical organizations and societies, judges competitions, and conducts master classes in Europe, the United States and Japan. He was awarded the Grand Prix Musical de la SACD (Société des Auteurs et Compositeurs Dramatiques) and the Grand Prix de la Ville de Paris.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on March 18, 2014, 04:17:07 pm
Paul Le Flem: Fantasie for Piano and Orchesta
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-abpv_UYmMY0/TuaNB_8rm6I/AAAAAAAAB1I/mNCqIeCPpK4/s400/le+flem.jpg)
From the collection of Karl Miller

Fantasie for Piano and Orchestra
Annie d'Arco, Piano
Rennes Theater Orchestra/Pierre Michel Le Conte


Paul Le Flem
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Paul Le Flem (18 March 1881 - 31 July 1984) was a French composer and music critic.


Biography

Born in Radon, Orne, and living most of his life in Lezardrieux, Le Flem studied at the Schola Cantorum under Vincent d'Indy and Albert Roussel, later teaching at the same establishment, where his pupils included Erik Satie and André Jolivet. His music is strongly influenced by his native Brittany, the landscape of which is reflected in most of his work.

Before World War I, Le Flem produced several major works, including his First Symphony, a Fantasy for Piano and Orchestra, and an opera. The war temporarily put an end to his compositional activities, and in its aftermath he devoted himself to music criticism and choral conducting. He wrote numerous articles for the periodical Comoedia.

In 1938, he began composing once again. Three additional symphonies and a second opera followed before he was finally forced to give up composition in 1976, at the age of 95, due to blindness. He died on 31 July 1984 at the age of 103.

Some of his dramatic works include the operas Le rossignol de St-Malo (The Nightingale of St Malo) and La magicienne de la mer (The Magician of the Sea), as well as a version of the chante-fable Aucassin et Nicolette. For the Dead and the seven Children's Pieces, both originally written in 1912, were orchestrated some years later. Two of the composer's children died young, and For the Dead is dedicated to their memory. In addition to his symphonies, Le Flem wrote evocative orchestral music such as En mer (At Sea) and La voix du large (The Voice of the Open Sea). Le Flem also composed the music for Jean Tedesco's short film The Great Gardener of France in 1942.
Personal life

Paul Le Flem, with his wife, Jeanne (Even), is the grandfather of actress Marika Green and great-grandfather of actress Eva Green by his daughter, Jeanne, who married Swedish journalist Lennart Green.[1][2][3]


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on December 04, 2014, 04:12:09 pm
20th Century French Piano Concerti
(https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQs4yb3HXmDzEbUqiZahFUeENKtrUikrcY0dVZHYiFW9n_9E9kMpQ)

From the collection of Karl Miller




Works:

Jacques Dupont (Jacque-Dupont) "Divertissment 1948" Concerto for Piano and Orchestra
(Premiere)
Composer, Piano
Paris Conservatory Orchestra
Pierre Le Conte, Conductor
Radio Broadcast



Jacques Casterede: Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Strings
Marie Claude Werchowski, piano
ORTF Chamber Orchestra/Pierre Monet, Conductor


Christian Manen: Piano Concerto, Op 30(1957)
Aline Von Berenson, piano
ORTF
Conducted by Pierre Dervaux


Claude Pascal: Piano Concerto (1958)
Genevieve Joy, Piano
ORTF Chamber Orchestra
Conducted by Andre Girad


Samsmon Francois: Piano Concerto
Societe des Concerts du Conservatoire
Samson Francois, Piano
Conducted by Georges Tzipine
Source LP: Pathe FCX 229



Rene Challan: Concerto Pastoral
Conducted by Georges Tzipine
Source LP: Pathe FCX 229






Title: Re: French music
Post by: cjvinthechair on December 04, 2014, 04:44:37 pm
Mr. Jowcol - delightful to hear from you; it's been a wee while. Thanks as always for taking the trouble to upload for us...bit of a rare event here nowadays !


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on December 05, 2014, 02:59:41 am
I have to confess I'm sitting on more goodies-  what is normally the slowest time of the year at work has turned into the busiest. But I'm glad to get the chance to share, and thank Karl for taking time our from his business for some volunteer work.

I'm holding a 15 hour collection of work by a little known American composer....  just to create a bit of excitement....


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on December 07, 2014, 10:30:49 pm
It's come to my attention that the first movement of the Francois is silent.   I'm looking into it.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Corentin Boissier on December 14, 2014, 01:22:25 pm
Warning : The recording of Jean-Michel Damase's "Concertino for Harp and Strings" (1951) is incomplete : the first four minutes are missing. This concertino lasts c. 13 minutes. Cf. this other performance on CD :
http://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/B00LCQAPAG/ref=dm_ws_sp_ps_dp


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on February 06, 2015, 07:26:39 pm
Music of Charles Koechlin
(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/composers/koechlin.jpg)(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4d/Charles_Koechlin_1.jpg)(http://www.francemusique.fr/sites/default/files/styles/image_ppale_full/public/asset/images/2013/12/koechlin.png?itok=S6zaW58R)
From the collection of Karl Miller



Works:


Volume 1:


Hymne au Soleil Op 127
(1st Movement Symphonie d'hymnes)
Edited break due to side change of cassette
BBC Concert Orchestra/Gary Brain


Hymne a la Nuit, Op. 48 no.1
(2nd Movement of Symphonie d'hymnes)
ORTF/Franz Andre


Symphonie No. 1, Op 57bis
ORTF/Manuel Rosenthal


Organ Chorale in F Minor Op. 90bis
Graham Barber organ

Le Jeu de la Nativite for small Orchestra
(Performers announced)

Volume 2:


Vers la Voute Etoilee
Berlin Philharmonic/ Zoltan Pesko

Liberte, Op. 153
From July 14th Incidental  Music for a play by Romain Rolland
Chorale de la Prefecture de Police
Musique des Gardiens de la Paix
Desire Dondeyne, Conductor
Chant du  Monde, LDX-M_8197


L'Abbaye
Chorus of Jeunesse Musicale de France
Organist Announced
Lyric Orchestra
Louis Martini, Conductor
Masterworks from France, Program 107


Classic Walpurgis Night Op. 38
ORTF/Andre Girard

Seven Stars Symphony, Op. 132
London Philharmonic/ Norman del Mar




Wikipedia Bio:
Charles Louis Eugène Koechlin (French: [ʃaʁl lwi øʒɛn keklɛ̃]; 27 November 1867 – 31 December 1950) was a French composer, teacher and writer on music. He was a political radical all his life and a passionate enthusiast for such diverse things as medieval music, The Jungle Book of Rudyard Kipling, Johann Sebastian Bach, film stars (especially Lilian Harvey and Ginger Rogers), traveling, stereoscopic photography and socialism. He once said: "The artist needs an ivory tower, not as an escape from the world, but as a place where he can view the world and be himself. This tower is for the artist like a lighthouse shining out across the world."[1]

Life
Koechlin was born in Paris, and was the youngest child of a large family. His mother's family came from Alsace and he identified with that region; his maternal grandfather had been the noted philanthropist and textile manufacturer Jean Dollfus, and Koechlin inherited his strongly developed social conscience. His father died when he was 14. Though he was early interested in music his family wanted him to become an engineer. He entered the École Polytechnique in 1887 but the following year was diagnosed with tuberculosis and had to spend six months recuperating in Algeria. He had to repeat his first year at the École and graduated with only mediocre grades. After a struggle with his family and private lessons with Charles Lefebvre he entered the Paris Conservatoire in 1890 studying first with Antoine Taudou for harmony. In 1892 he started studying with Massenet for composition, André Gedalge for fugue and counterpoint, and Louis Bourgault-Ducoudray for musical history. His fellow-pupils included George Enescu, Ernest Le Grand, Reynaldo Hahn, Max d'Ollone, Henri Rabaud, and Florent Schmitt. From 1896 he was a pupil of Gabriel Fauré, where his fellow-pupils now included Ravel and Jean Roger-Ducasse. Fauré had a major influence on Koechlin; in fact Koechlin wrote the first Fauré biography (1927), a work which is still of value. In 1898 a grateful Koechlin orchestrated the popular suite from Fauré's Pelléas et Mélisande and in 1900 assisted Fauré in the production of the huge open-air drama Promethée.

After his graduation Koechlin became a freelance composer and teacher. He married Suzanne Pierrard in 1903, but after 1921 regularly corresponded with his former student, composer Catherine Murphy Urner in California. In 1909 he began regular work as a critic for the Chronique des Arts and in 1910 was one of the founders, with Ravel, of the Société musicale indépendante, with whose activities he was intensely associated. From its inception in the early 1930s to his death he was a passionate supporter of the International Society for Contemporary Music, eventually becoming practitioner of its French section. From 1937 he was elected practitioner of the Fédération Musicale Populaire. At first comfortably off, he divided his time between Paris and country homes in Villers-sur-Mer and the Côte d'Azur, but after the onset of World War I his circumstances were progressively reduced, he was forced to sell one of his houses and, from 1915, took work lecturing and teaching. Partly due to his vigorous championing of younger composers and new styles, he was never successful in his attempts to gain a permanent teaching position for himself, though he was an examiner for many institutions (e.g. the Conservatoires of Brussels, Rheims and Marseilles). He was rejected for the post of Professor of counterpoint and fugue at the Paris Conservatoire in 1926 by 20 votes to two (the two being Albert Roussel and Maurice Emmanuel), but from 1935 to 1939 he was allowed to teach fugue and modal polyphony at the Schola Cantorum.

He visited the USA four times to lecture and teach in 1918-19, 1928, 1929 and 1937. On the second and third visits he taught at the University of California, Berkeley, through arrangements made by Catherine Urmer, who afterward lived with him until 1933.[2] On the 1929 visit his symphonic poem La Joie païenne won the Hollywood Bowl Prize for Composition and was performed there under the baton of Eugene Goossens. Even so, Koechlin had to pay for the preparation of orchestral parts, and in the 1930s he sank most of his savings into organizing performances of some of his orchestral works. In the 1940s, however, the music department of Belgian Radio took up his cause and broadcast several premieres of important scores including the first complete performance of the Jungle Book cycle. He died, and his body is buried, at his country home at Le Canadel, Var, aged 83. Some of his papers are housed at the University of California at Berkeley Library, donated by Catherine Urmer's husband Charles Rollins Shatto.[3] In 1940, the French government offered him the award of Chevalier de la Legion d'honneur, but he refused it.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on February 06, 2015, 07:28:51 pm
Continued Biography of Charles Koechlin from Wikipedia:

Style and compositions
Koechlin was enormously prolific, as the worklist below (by no means exhaustive) suggests. He was highly eclectic in inspiration (nature, the mysterious orient, French folksong, Bachian chorale, Hellenistic culture, astronomy, Hollywood movies, etc.) and musical technique, but the expressive core of his language remained distinct from his contemporaries. At the start of his career he concentrated on songs with orchestral accompaniment, few of which were performed as intended during his lifetime. A recent (2006) recording of a selection (Hänssler Classic CD93.159) shows he was already master of an individual impressionism deriving less from Debussy than from Berlioz and Fauré. Thereafter he concentrated on symphonic poems, chamber and instrumental works.

After World War I his continuing devotion to the symphonic poem and the large orchestra at a period when neoclassicism and small ensembles were more fashionable may have discouraged performance and acceptance of his works. His compositions include the four symphonic poems and three orchestral songs making up Livre de la jungle after Rudyard Kipling; many other symphonic poems including Le Buisson Ardent after Romain Rolland (this is a diptych of two orchestral poems, performable separately) and Le Docteur Fabricius after a novel by his uncle Charles Dollfus; three string quartets; five symphonies including a Seven Stars Symphony inspired by Hollywood; sonatas for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, violin, viola and cello, and much other chamber music; many songs, over two hundred opus numbers in all; and a vast number of monodies, fugal studies, chorale harmonizations and other educational pieces. Many works remain unpublished, however.

He wrote in several styles, sometimes severe Baroque counterpoint, as in the fugue that opens his Second Symphony (unrecorded as of 2005), sometimes "impressionistically" as in the tone poem Au Loin, or, as in the Symphony No. 2's scherzo, yet more astringently. He could go from extreme simplicity to extreme complexity of texture and harmony from work to work, or within the same work. Some of his most characteristic effects come from a very static treatment of harmony, savouring the effect of, for instance, a stacked-up series of fifths through the whole gamut of the instruments. His melodies are often long, asymmetrical and wide-ranging in tessitura. He was closely interested in the works of Schoenberg, some of which he quoted from memory in his treatise on Orchestration. The twelve tone technique is one of the several modern music styles parodied in the 'Jungle Book' symphonic poem Les Bandar-Log, but Koechlin also wrote a few pieces in what he described as the 'style atonal-sériel'. He was fascinated by the movies and wrote many 'imaginary' film scores and works dedicated to the Hollywood actress Lilian Harvey, on whom he had a crush.
(http://www.doctormacro.com/Images/Harvey,%20Lilian/Annex/NRFPT/Annex%20-%20Harvey,%20Lilian_NRFPT_01.jpg)
Lilian Harvey

His Seven Stars Symphony features movements inspired by Douglas Fairbanks, Lilian Harvey, Greta Garbo, Clara Bow, Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings and Charlie Chaplin in some of their most famous film roles. He also composed an Epitaph for Jean Harlow and a suite of dances for Ginger Rogers. He was interested in using unusual instruments, notably the saxophone and the early electronic instrument the Ondes Martenot. One movement of the Second Symphony requires four of them (and has not usually been included in the few performances of the work, for that reason). He also wrote several pieces for the hunting-horn, an instrument he himself played. Koechlin orchestrated several pieces by other composers. In addition to the Fauré Pelléas et Mélisande suite mentioned above he orchestrated the bulk of Claude Debussy's 'legende dansée' Khamma under the composer's direction, from the piano score [1], and orchestrated Cole Porter's ballet Within the Quota; other works he transcribed include Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy and Chabrier's Bourrée fantasque.

As educator and author
Koechlin began assisting Fauré in teaching fugue and counterpoint while he was still a student in the 1890s, but though he taught privately and was an external examiner for the Paris Conservatoire throughout his career, he never occupied a permanent salaried teaching position. Composers who studied with him included Germaine Tailleferre, Roger Désormière, Francis Poulenc and Henri Sauguet. Cole Porter studied orchestration with him in 1923-24. Darius Milhaud, though never a pupil, became a close friend and considered he learned more from Koechlin than any other pedagogue. Koechlin wrote three compendious textbooks: one on Harmony (3 vols, 1923-6), one on Music Theory (1932-4) and a huge treatise on the subject of orchestration (4 vols, 1935–43) which is a classic treatment of the subject. He also wrote a number of smaller didactic works, as well as the life of Fauré mentioned above.

Character
Despite his lack of worldly success Koechlin was apparently a loved and venerated figure in French music, his long flowing beard contributing to his patriarchal image. Following his 1888 illness the need to build up his strength led him to become an enthusiastic mountaineer, swimmer and tennis player. He was also an amateur astronomer and an accomplished photographer. He was one of the great nature-mystics among French composers, whose personal creed was pantheistic rather than Christian. Though never a member of the Communist Party he subscribed to its ideals, and in the later 1930s especially was much concerned with the idea of 'Music for the People'.




Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on February 10, 2015, 08:49:44 pm
July 14th Incidental Music for a play by Romain Rolland
(http://img.cdandlp.com/2013/03/imgL/115902678.jpg)

From the collection of Karl Miller

Overture /​ Jacques Ibert
Palais-Royal /​ Georges Auric
Introduction et marche funèbre /​ Darius Milhaud
Prélude /​ Albert Roussel
Liberté /​ Charles Koechlin
Marche sur la Bastille /​ Arthur Honegger
Fête de la liberté /​ Daniel Lazarus


Chorale de la Préfecture de police
Musique des Gardiens de la paix
Désiré Dondeyne, conductor
Source LP: LDX-M-8197


Curtain Designs for play by Picasso:
(http://web.org.uk/picasso/14July.jpg)
(http://www.abcgallery.com/P/picasso/picasso296.JPG)

Cover for second vinyl release in 1976:
(http://cdn.discogs.com/vWngEQ5enmfLunkXKSv0xwfYoGo=/fit-in/470x462/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(96)/discogs-images/R-2740898-1298913509.jpeg.jpg)

PDF of the play (in French) available here:
https://archive.org/download/le14juilletactio00roll/le14juilletactio00roll.pdf
 (https://archive.org/download/le14juilletactio00roll/le14juilletactio00roll.pdf)




Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on February 10, 2015, 09:43:25 pm
Corrected file from the Francois Piano Concerto

Courtesy of Karl Miller


For those of you who were puzzled by the silent first movement of the Francois piano concerto, Karl has sent me a replacement version.  If you go the the Collection of 20 Century French Piano Concerti in the Downloads section, you will see the new link.







Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on March 02, 2015, 08:40:20 pm
More Music of Charles Koechlin
(http://musictimeline.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/940koechlin.jpg)
From the collection of Karl Miller

This disc should have been with the last collection-- we had some problems with it, and Karl sent a replacement.  I've numbered and tagged these files as a continuation of the previous post. 

The Composer Speaks (in French, and English Translation)
Poem for Horn and Orchestra, Op 70

Performers, venue and date unknown
Symphony No 2 Op 196
I. Fugue on a subject by Ernest La Grand
II Scherzo: L'ame libre et Fantastique
III Andante( a suite of 6 chorales)
IV. Fugue modale sur un subject de Catherine Urner
V Final
London Philharmonic
Cond by Constantine Silvestri, 1967


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on March 11, 2015, 02:43:25 am
Corrected file from the Francois Piano Concerto

Courtesy of Karl Miller


For those of you who were puzzled by the silent first movement of the Francois piano concerto, Karl has sent me a replacement version.  If you go the the Collection of 20 Century French Piano Concerti in the Downloads section, you will see the new link.

Permission Denied by Mediafire :(








Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on April 04, 2015, 02:13:25 pm
Charles Koechlin was a remarkable composer. His music is somewhat uneven and his total ouput, with many works subject to extensive revision and produced over lengthy periods of time, difficult to easily categorise. There is however a visionary quality about the music which makes him a unique figure, always interesting and certainly deserving of much more attention. Hanssler seemed to have a mission to record Koechlin's music but that project appears to have run out of steam.

Splendid therefore to get more today in "La Cite nouvelle" :)


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on June 24, 2015, 04:17:42 pm
Explore the Crystal Clear S0und of Sonotape SW 1005
I've also posted this under Mexican and Russian nationalities! 

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTU3OVgxNjAw/z/iV4AAOSwpbJVSO90/$_57.JPG)
From the collection of Karl Miller



This is an interesting find- a transfer a commercial Reel to Reel Tape issued in the 1950s, with a lively cross section of 20th Century Music. Anything with Iron Foundry and Sensemaya has to be good! I'm pretty sure  the image above is of the source of  Karl's transfer.

If you paid 60 cents in November of 1956 for your new copy of High Fidelity, you would have found the following review.

(http://i722.photobucket.com/albums/ww230/Jowcol61/SonotapeReview_zpsyberjoh2.jpg) 

Not the friendliest review but with a 15 inch  per second source tape, as opposed to a worn LP, you will really get some very good sound from recordings that are more than 60 years old.    From what I  can guess, the "study in percussion" may have been something whipped up by the engineers to show off the speakers in your bachelor pad,  as it was not released on vinyl. It was probably created  to show off the "crystal clear" sound of tape, and maybe to rival your collection of Martin Denny Exotica albums.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5pE7fipv8AI/Tmxdg2BayII/AAAAAAAABIQ/NJ-I8F9YlZg/s1600/playboy+pad+2.jpg)
(http://www.josephholmes.io/spaceage/jpeg/xpercussion.jpg)



As you download this file, I'd suggest getting out your martini shaker, and pour drinks for two.








Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on September 01, 2015, 01:19:17 pm
I just posted Milhaud's Salade and a collection of works by Jean Michel Damase in the downloads section. Happy Hunting!


Title: Re: French music
Post by: Dundonnell on November 30, 2015, 02:59:00 pm
I am never very sure about downloading anything from a site with which I am not familiar but I was keen to hear the Jean Rivier Symphony No.5 and-of course-grateful for the link.

Rivier was a French composer of whom we hear too little.  Of his eight symphonies I was previously familiar with only No.3. Four of the eight are for string orchestra but No.5 is for full orchestra. Although the recording is from 1953 it does provide further evidence of the delicate good taste which is often mentioned in connection with the composer.


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on April 28, 2016, 02:15:58 am
Music of Francis Poulenc



(https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSV2sBfyo5Lt7UX9ahslIBGZUJafgO5_FJ7875Mp9tKWGL1wWuKDA)

From the collection of Karl Miller

Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra
Composer and Evelyne Crochet, pianos

Gloria (Premiere)
Adele Addison, Soprano
Chorus Pro Musica (Alfred Nash Patterson, conductor)

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Charles Munch, conductor
[21 January 1961]


Program Notes



Concerto For Two Pianos

by Ileen Zovluck

Francis Poulenc was a member of the French group of composers referred to as "Les Six." When the group was first formed, they stood in an open rebellion against the overt romanticism of César Franck and the impressionism of Claude Debussy. This group which also included Milhaud and Honnegger, established simplicity of thought and expressions as their program; their music was distinguished by succinctness and a flair for popular idioms. There is in Poulenc's music an ingenuity and freshness that seem always to have an undercurrent of folklore at its base.

Poulenc's catalog includes such diverse genres as ballets, opera, chamber music, sacred music, songs, choral works and piano pieces. The medium in which Poulenc distinguished himself the most was perhaps the concerto - a form which he renewed, broadened and diversified; his concertos indeed hold a very special place among his works. They include: the Concert champêtre (1927-8), for harpsichord and orchestra; Aubade (1929), a choreographic concerto for piano and eighteen instruments; this Concerto in D minor for Two Pianos and Orchestra (1932); the Concerto in G for Organ, Strings and Timpani (1938); and the Piano Concerto (1949). Each work differs from the others in its spirit, intentions and orchestral complement.

The Two-Piano Concerto was commissioned by the American patroness of the arts, Princess Edmond de Polignac, née Winnareta Singer. The princess - who was a friend to both Poulenc and his childhood friend, the pianist Jacques Février - asked for a piece that the two Frenchmen could play together; in 1932, during a period of two and a half months, Poulenc produced the D minor Concerto, a "gay and straightforward" work, full of fresh, spontaneous and well organized ideas.
With this piece, Poulenc took a new step in his evolution as a composer. Like the Concert champêtre, which harks back to the Baroque era, the Two-Piano Concerto looks back in time, in this case to the Classical era; however, although he used as a model the Double Concertos of Bach, Mozart and Mendelssohn before him, he breaks free of the Baroque and Classical conventions to which the early masters were tied, as he opts to follow the freer spirit of a divertissement. This Concerto is one of Poulenc's most typically inventive compositions.

The first movement, Allegro, ma non troppo, is marked by its sprightly dynamics and irrepresible, buoyant energy. Being thoroughly acquainted with pianistic resources, here the composer provides ingenious dialogue between the two soloists. Woven into the thematic and contrapuntal web are chansonettes and popular Parisian tunes from the café- concert circuit. Of note, as well, are the coloristic effects in the coda, where the composer admittedly evoked the Balinese gamelan music he had heard at the 1931 Colonial Exposition.

In an era of retrospective tributes, where Stravinsky was going back to Bach and Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev would write like a "twentieth century" Haydn, or Poulenc himself would pay tribute to Couperin in hisConcert champêtre, it is not surprising that the composer would chose to pay homage to the composer he preferred over all the rest - Mozart. The outlines of the Larghetto are quite classical, as the outer sections employ a theme that brings to mind Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21


Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on April 28, 2016, 02:17:54 am
Music of Francis Poulenc II



Gloria
by James Keller From the San Francisco Symphony Website

ancis Jean Marcel Poulenc was born January 7, 1899, in Paris, France, and died there January 30, 1963. He composed his Gloria from May 1959 through June 1960 on commission from the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation in the Library of Congress, and he dedicated it to the memory of Serge and Nathalie Koussevitzky. It received its first public performance January 20, 1961, at Boston’s Symphony Hall, with Charles Munch conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chorus Pro Musica (Alfred Nash Patterson, director), and soprano Adele Addison. The first San Francisco Symphony performances of Gloria, in April 1971, were led by Seiji Ozawa and featured soprano Lois Marshall, the Stanford University Choir, and the Stanford University Chorus. The most recent SFS performances, in September 1996, were conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas, with the SFS Chorus and soprano Heidi Grant Murphy. The score calls for piccolo and two flutes (second also doubling piccolo), two oboes and English horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, harp, strings, a four-part mixed chorus (sopranos, altos, tenors, and basses), and soprano soloist. Performance time: about twenty-five minutes.

Music lovers are accustomed to think of Francis Poulenc as a good-humored composer. Even so famous a work as his Gloria provides no impetus to revise that point of view, as the piece is largely ebullient rather than merely pious. It was this high-spirited aspect that defined Poulenc when he first gained public notice, at the moment when the deprivation of World War I was ceding to the buoyancy of the Roaring Twenties. That’s when he and five of his iconoclastic colleagues declared themselves to be a Société des nouveaux jeunes, a label that would give way to the more informal Groupe des Six. Though each of Les Six—Poulenc, Darius Milhaud, Arthur Honegger, Georges Auric, Germaine Tailleferre, and Louis Durey—ended up pursuing distinct paths, the jovial brashness they all shared in the early 1920s remained forever a part of Poulenc’s style.

But beginning in the 1930s, Poulenc also began to display a more introspective side. This development seemed to be sparked by the death, in 1930, of his close friend Raymonde Linossier, the only woman with whom he ever fell deeply in love. The sudden decease of another close friend, the composer Pierre-Octave Ferroud, sent Poulenc into a period of soul-searching and sparked his renewed interest in the Catholicism into which he had been born but which he had largely set aside. One result was his impulse to write religious music, an interest that would lead to a corpus of sacred choral music, both a cappella and accompanied, that includes his Litanies à la vierge noire (1936), Mass in G major (1937), Quatre motets pour un temps de pénitence (1938-39), Stabat Mater (1950-51), Gloria (1959-60), and finally his Sept répons des ténèbres (1962).

Certainly the sacred did not replace the secular in Poulenc’s output. Instead, we find him sometimes writing devoutly religious pieces, sometimes unabashedly worldly ones, and not infrequently allowing the aesthetics of those styles to intermingle. In a speech he delivered in 1962, he emphasized this cross-fertilization when describing how the character of his Gloria coalesced. Speaking of the work’s second movement (“Laudamus te”), he said: “The second movement caused a scandal. I wonder why? I was simply thinking, in writing it, of the Gozzoli frescoes in which the angels stick out their tongues; I was thinking also of the serious Benedictines whom I saw playing soccer one day.” He expanded on the fresco image, which relates to the decorations Benozzo Gozzoli painted circa 1460 in the Chapel of the Magi of the Palazzo Medici Riccardi in Florence: “If you go to Florence, if you go to the Riccardi Palace, if you go to admire the sublime Gozzoli frescoes of the angels, you will see a whole series of angels. And if you look at the angels very closely, there is one who is sticking out his tongue at his neighbor, right? I take the position that angels are not always well-behaved.” Whether this exact image actually exists may be open to question. Nonetheless, these angels are far from solemn. Instead, they resemble a children’s choir that has just returned to rehearsal and is still stoked up on recess. Inattention reins, and ones senses that the whole bunch of them could erupt into chaos at any moment. The important thing, though, is that Poulenc believed that one of them was sticking out its tongue at another, that it was real in his memory. In spirit, he was on the mark, and it is probably far from incidental that the golden halos of those very angels are inscribed with words plucked from the Gloria.

When the Koussevitzky Foundation first approached Poulenc about a commission, a wish was expressed that he might undertake a symphonic work. The idea didn’t appeal to him. After some back and forth, the foundation proposed that he write something entirely of his own choosing. Poulenc accepted, and in April 1959 his Gloria began to take form, even before the terms of the commission were formalized. That month, his devoted friend and musical partner Pierre Bernac sent him the Latin text of the Gloria along with a French translation. By the end of year the work was complete in piano score, and it reached it final, orchestrated state in June 1960.

It was decided that the Boston Symphony, the late Koussevitzky’s one-time orchestra, would perform the premiere, and that orchestra moved into action to put the piece on its schedule. In the ensuing flurry of correspondence, Poulenc expressed enthusiasm that the choral work would be entrusted to Boston’s Chorus Pro Musica, since its director, Alfred Nash Patterson, had previously conducted a number of the composer’s compositions. Apparently Leontyne Price was desired as the soloist, but when she proved unavailable the job went instead to Adele Addison; in the event, she magnificently fulfilled Poulenc’s admonition that “the soloist should have the exact voice of Desdemona, which is to say a warm but pianissimo high register.” Poulenc signed on to appear in the same concert as one of the two soloists in his Concerto for Two Pianos, and he agreed to attend and advise at the rehearsals for the Gloria, at which he was looking forward to crossing paths again with his old friend Charles Munch, who had succeeded Koussevitzky as the Boston Symphony’s conductor.

The reviews of the premiere were ecstatic, and they may have meant more to the composer than almost any others in his career. “Thank the Lord the Gloria was considered important,” he wrote to the French critic Henri Hell, who had recently published a Poulenc biography. “I know full well that I am not considered in vogue but at least I need to be recognized. And this has happened.”




Title: Re: French music
Post by: jowcol on April 28, 2016, 02:18:57 am
Music of Francis Poulenc III



Poulenc divides the liturgical text of the Gloria into six sections that are organized rather in pairs. The second and fourth movements reveal Poulenc in his lighthearted mood, while the third and fifth are pious in their bearing. These are framed by the first movement, in which a positive spirit is ennobled by a degree of monumentality, and the sixth, which makes use of both of these contrasting attitudes and recalls some music from the opening section, which provides a nice balance to what the composer described as “a large choral symphony.”

Not infrequently, the Gloria bespeaks Poulenc’s admiration of Stravinsky, who had been the lodestar for all the composers of Les Six when they came of age circa 1920. The opening movement has something of that earlier flavor, its forthright neo-classicism here extending to double-dotted, maestoso fanfare figures that summon up the idea of a French Baroque overture. The two measures (scored for winds alone) that conclude the orchestra’s introduction could almost have been plucked from Stravinsky’s Symphonies of Wind Instruments. These herald the entry of the chorus, which wends its way fluidly through a thicket of harmonic centers, always preserving a tone of jubilation.

Already in the first movement Poulenc has doled out his music in relatively short phrases. This tendency becomes even more pronounced in the playful “Laudamus te.” The brief phrases are constantly revisited and reassembled, though Poulenc often injects slight changes are they recur, which keeps performers on their toes and listeners on the alert.

Small cells of music continue to be the norm throughout the piece. In the “Domine Deus” movement, their material is perfectly in tune with the prayerful posture of the soprano soloist. If the music up to this point has reminded us of an earlier, somewhat obstreperous Poulenc, this movement could only be a work of his more sobering maturity. After this expanse of entreaty, the “Domine fili unigenite” breaks forth with vibrant buoyancy and passes by in a flash. Now the “pious Poulenc” returns, in “Domine Deus, Agnus Dei.” In its opening measures, the clarinet proposes an embellished octave leap that is one of Poulenc’s musical fingerprints, frequently encountered in his scores and soon to appear with heartbreaking purpose in his end-of-life sonatas for oboe and for clarinet. The soprano soloist also takes up a variant on the same, to haunting, mystical effect. The concluding section,” Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris”—again opening maestoso—includes not only references to music heard earlier, but also provides some new sounds. At the words “Quoniam tu solus sanctus” the choir sings a cappella in tight four-part harmony, much in the mode of Poulenc’s more severe choral compositions. In the work’s closing minutes, the soprano intones a fervent “Amen” and joins with the chorus to conclude in a spirit of harmonic luxury (reminiscent of Ravel), ardent sincerity, and transcendent calm.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: calyptorhynchus on May 16, 2017, 10:44:37 pm
Re the links to Nicolas Bacri's Symphonies 1 & 5

I can't get the download. If I click on it it takes me to the website main page, if I copy and paste the whole url the website tells me the link is invalid.



Title: Re: French music
Post by: calyptorhynchus on May 19, 2017, 07:57:30 am
Bacri's symphonies downloaded fine just now. Don't know what the problem was before.

Thanks