The Art-Music Forum

Little-known music of all eras => Downloads discussion => Topic started by: Neil McGowan on August 14, 2012, 06:03:14 pm



Title: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 14, 2012, 06:03:14 pm
Thank you indeed for sharing these rare recordings :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Caostotale on August 14, 2012, 09:47:38 pm
Though I may respectfully disagree with the stylistic tastes of the people at 'Unsung Composers', I did like the way they partitioned discussion and download links. In the spirit of that arrangement...

Thank you Holger for the Rakov pieces. I don't know much of his work aside from several piano sonatinas that he composed. The only work of his that I've heard is a short piano concerto (no. 2) that Fyrexianoff has posted on Youtube. That work is pretty much the definition of lightness, clarity and is well-described by the comment that suggests a 'Russian Poulenc.'

After reading his bio on Wikipedia and noting the strict conservatism of his style, I find it rather interesting that Edison Denisov was one of his students, as he's one of the more boldly avant-garde composers to work in Russia during that time.

http://youtu.be/nkffZGyGStk (http://youtu.be/nkffZGyGStk)

Bio at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolai_Rakov

His music (including LPs) has also been cataloged at the following site:
http://home.wanadoo.nl/ovar/rakov.htm



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on August 16, 2012, 06:54:31 pm
Thanks for your feedback, both of you. I now finally come round to reply.

Rakov was quite a conservative composer indeed, even by Soviet standards. He had a short more advanced period in the early 1970s (though even then, his music was still not that modern - some neoclassicist influences, a freer approach to tonality but not really more), but later works indicate he finally returned to his roots.

Indeed, Denisov was one of his students, and so was Schnittke (and others like Boris Tchaikovsky, Andrei Eshpai, Nikolai Peiko or Karen Khatchaturian). As far as I know, Rakov was mainly busy with his music, I mean he was not really a public figure but just did his work, which was composing, teaching and conducting. Most probably, the conservativism of his style was due to his personal preferences, which doesn't necessarily imply consequences for his teaching activities.

I wouldn't call his music too distinctive, but it is definitely very nice, with strong Russian flavour, often rather memorable and always well-written. His First Symphony is one of his finest pieces in my view. Its key is D Major but Rakov really seems to be keen to avoid it. Actually, the first movement is mainly in B Minor, creating an elegiac mood. Also, the slow introduction of the finale is in D Minor - Major is only achieved when the fast main part is reached, though the coda challenges this a little again.

I have many more pieces by him and might provide one or the other for download in the future.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: jowcol on August 18, 2012, 01:59:21 pm
Holger-- thanks for your reposting of :

Çary Nurymow (Chary Nurymov, 1941–1993)
Symphony No. 2 (1984)
USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony Orchestra / Gennady Rozhdestvensky

This is a great work, and I've listened to it many times.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on August 19, 2012, 01:26:11 am
Thanks from me too for the Nurymov which I have enjoyed since you posted it on UC. The Chalayev is new to me but it is outstanding. Thank you for both of these great symphonies.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on August 22, 2012, 10:06:09 pm
Thanks, Sicmu, for the Akhiyan 1st Symphony. Do you have his Symphony No.2?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Sicmu on August 22, 2012, 11:34:55 pm
Thanks, Sicmu, for the Akhiyan 1st Symphony. Do you have his Symphony No.2?

It's on UC.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on August 23, 2012, 12:17:14 am
Thanks, Sicmu, for the Akhiyan 1st Symphony. Do you have his Symphony No.2?

It's on UC.

Thank you very much. The first time I read your post I read it as Symphony No.2 "Trombone Symphony" and completely missed the ";" inbetween.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 23, 2012, 11:27:33 am
I read it as Symphony No.2 "Trombone Symphony"

Wishful thinking? ;)

(http://www.uwec.edu/Mus-The/events/images/TromboneEnsF08_3.jpg)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 25, 2012, 02:23:29 pm
Vladimir Vladimirovich Shcherbachov (1887 to 1952) - his Nonet for flute, harp, pianoforte, string quartet., female voice, and mime-dancer (textless, 1919)

What a very fine piece this is indeed! I listened to it immediately a second time.

Do we know anything of the recording - who the performers are, particularly the pianist (who has the lion's share of the slow movement)?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: guest54 on August 25, 2012, 07:37:03 pm
You need a Swede I think. Or I seem to remember that at the time - around 2007 - the same concert was also broadcast on BBC "Through the Night." Perhaps there is still a "play-list" of that somewhere?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on August 25, 2012, 07:54:07 pm
I haven't downloaded this performance because I think I have the same: German Deutschlandradio has broadcast this concert, too. It took place 18 October 2004 in the Estonia Concert Hall, Tallin. Anu Komsi was the soprano and the NYDD Ensemble was directed by Olari Elts. The performance took 32 minutes. But if you like I will download the file later. My Swedish isn't perfect but it works.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 25, 2012, 10:21:56 pm
I'd be greatly in your debt, if you happen to find the time :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on August 26, 2012, 01:00:34 am
Yes, it was from the same concert. This is from the website of the NYYD Ensemble:

18. oktoober 2004 kell 19.00 Estonia Kontserdisaal
EBU kontserdisari DISCOVERIES
PRE-BRAINWASH
NYYD Ensemble. Dirigent Olari Elts, solist Anu Komsi (sopran, Soome)

Sergei Prokofjev           - Overture on Hebrew Themes op 34
Vladimir Štšerbatšov    - Nonett
Mihhail Gnessin            - Adõgeja sekstett
Aleksander Mossolov/
Edisson Denissov         - Three Children’s Scenes op 18
                                     - Four Newspaper Ads op21
Nikolai Roslavets          - Chamber Symphony

The Swedish announcer gives the following soloist:

Anu Komsi, soprano
Mihkel Peäske, flute
Marrit Gerretz-Traksman, piano
Eda Peäske, harp

He gives 1920 as the date of composition.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 26, 2012, 09:09:32 am
Thank you very kindly for uploading that information :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 28, 2012, 12:26:48 pm
Bogoslovsky - new & very welcome name; bit concerned on seeing the dates that the music would be too 'challenging', but it's delightful, thanks !


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: SBookman on August 28, 2012, 06:54:59 pm
Sir,

Cannot find Akhiyan here, (where the search feature seems imperfect), nor on UC.

SBookman


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: peeknocker on August 29, 2012, 12:07:07 am
You need a Swede I think. 

Evidently I am not the only one seeking help from a Swede!

http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,628.msg3414.html#msg3414 (http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,628.msg3414.html#msg3414)

 ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on August 29, 2012, 04:11:47 am
Sir,

Cannot find Akhiyan here, (where the search feature seems imperfect), nor on UC.

SBookman

Here you must first click on "Downloads" then type Akhinyan in search block. Be sure to spell it as I just did. On UC you can search from the home page but be sure you select "Search entire forum" and you must spell it Akhinian. Both of these spelling are different than the one you used in the quote above.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: SBookman on August 29, 2012, 10:57:15 am
Sir,

Thankyou; my spelling error.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 31, 2012, 10:30:58 am
We were recently discussing soviet-era music, and whether music written in praise of the prevailing Soviet Government between 1917 and 1990 deserves the label of 'soiled goods'?

I was thinking of that this morning when Mr Dundonnell posted a request for a piece by Schedrin. The Schedrin work in question is from 2000. Yet I find Schedrin's music, if anything, more offensive than Knipper's, and I asked myself why that was?  I think it's because I find the vacuity of Schedrin's music annoying. He has become famous due to two extra-musical circumstances. The first is his former toadying support of the Communist Party - whose ex-leaders continue to govern post-soviet Russia. The second is by dint of being the husband of legendary Bolshoi Theatre ballerina Maya Plisetskaya. [This second merits some explanation. In many countries elsewhere, few people along a shopping street could name a ballerina of any nationality, let alone their own. But in Russia, ballet has been prized to such a degree that ballet stars are household names - even among those who hate the genre. Not only are their performances endlessly televised, but they turn up on daytime tv, promoting everything from their autobiographies, to ranges of dancewear or cranky diets.]

I struggle in vain to applaud or enjoy Schedrin's music... and his latter compositions I find especially bare of interest. I heard his opera LOLITA a few years ago (in fact I saw the only Moscow performance, in which a friend of mine played the title role) and I was looking at my watch after the first hour... to find that only 19 minutes had actually passed. The second act consists of a sequence of clusters, which I found remarkable only because the soloists managed to pick their cue-note out of them.

We can blame Knipper all we please...  but I find music written upon the cynically voyeuristic and vicarious theme of Lolita considerably more suspect than anything written in praise of the Red Army in 1945 ;)

But don't just take my word for it... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8y9oBNBrOk)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Gerard on August 31, 2012, 10:57:22 am
. . . in Russia, ballet has been prized to such a degree that ballet stars are household names - even among those who hate the genre. Not only are their performances endlessly televised, but they turn up on daytime tv, promoting everything from their autobiographies, to ranges of dancewear or cranky diets. . . .

Whereas in Britain it is ice-skaters and snooker players who perform that function, is it not.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 31, 2012, 11:02:38 am
Whereas in Britain it is ice-skaters and snooker players who perform that function, is it not.

 ;)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on August 31, 2012, 01:26:26 pm
Very interesting, because my feelings regarding Shchedrin's music do not differ much.

In fact, I really like Shchedrin's earliest pieces a lot, e.g. the Humpbacked Horse or the First Piano Concerto. These may be conformist pieces and examples of Socialist Realism, but for me, this music is very charming and attractive, nothing sophisticated at all but just nice, tuneful and pleasant.

However, Shchedrin's music written after 1960 fails to leave a lasting impression on me at all. Though the reasons may differ from piece to piece, a main feature is that in many Shchedrin pieces, I miss a sort of clear intention, an inner drive within the music. It somehow starts, takes a while, some things may happen but when it's over I fail to remember much of it, not do I have the feeling of any consequence or organic process. It's somehow empty.

Other pieces are too glaring for my taste (I am thinking of the Seagull, for example). Also, when Shchedrin intends to create tension it often sounds a little strained, anyway not very attractive in my view.

In any case, I have not found any piece in Shchedrin's later output so far which really impressed me.

Of course, these are only personal statements, but I found it remarkable to read Neil's statement in comparison to my own experiences.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cilgwyn on August 31, 2012, 01:35:26 pm
I don't know anything about ballet dancing,but I know who Darcey Bussell is & I've seen enough newspaper & glossy photos of her,over the last few years,to paper my wall....if I wanted to! ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on August 31, 2012, 03:12:21 pm
I miss a sort of clear intention, an inner drive within the music. It somehow starts, takes a while, some things may happen but when it's over I fail to remember much of it

I recognise that feeling very well :)

He's clearly a well-schooled composer, and he has the technical facility at his disposal to write well - his orchestration is imagninative. But he appears to have lost the creative spark that enlivened his early work... as though he's just 'going through the motions'?  The score for LOLITA is very peculiar in that regard. Apparently he wrote the second act much later than the first, having put it in a drawer for a while in the interim. A completely different style dominates in the second act, and it appears to be going nowhere.

I wonder if it is too fanciful to imagine that he was brought up and trained during the soviet period - which then rapidly and rather unexpectedly ended, leaving him unequipped to write for a post-soviet age?  Or perhaps just unsure what kind of music that age might want or need?  I'm reminded of the hero of Viktor Pelevin's novel "Generation P" [mysteriously released under different titles in English translation, where it's been called both "Homo Zapiens" (Penguin) and "Babylon" (Faber & Faber). The "P" in the title stands for "Pepsi" - the text tells us explicitly - so I can't understand why that title couldn't be used?]. "Vavilen Tatarsky" is trained and schooled from his earliest years in the finest elite soviet schools and universities as a "Soviet Poet". On the day of his graduation from University, the Soviet Union falls to pieces, and he is a Soviet Poet without a Soviet Union to write for. Thus begins his nightmarish journey....

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/e2/Generation_P.jpg/200px-Generation_P.jpg)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on September 03, 2012, 06:40:24 pm
Any chance of adding to your Peiko uploads, Holger ???

Symphonies Nos. 3, 5 and 6 are not available on classical-music online.net for download so if you........... ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on September 03, 2012, 07:17:56 pm
Colin,

I'll see what I can do. :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: MVS on September 16, 2012, 03:05:52 am
Wellll, now... as for Shchedrin, I would suggest that his "Russian Photographs" is a wonderful, deeply felt, work... and The Lady with the Lapdog is a fine work too. 


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Malito on September 16, 2012, 05:22:41 pm
I have always been a big fan of his Symphony No. 1 which, as far as I know has not been on CD...it should be.  I agree that most of the music of Shchedrin is not that memorable byut the 1st symphony and his "Anna Karenina" ballet are my favorites by him.  Malito


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Tartini on September 17, 2012, 01:21:39 pm
There is one, maybe hard to find CD: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shchedrin-Orchestral-Choral-Rodion-Konstantinovich/dp/B000023ZSA/ref=sr_1_16?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1347884358&sr=1-16


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: MVS on September 24, 2012, 09:34:04 pm
Re:  Arthur Lourie

I was really looking forward to the broadcast of the Lourie Symphony, but it turned out to be a somewhat of a disappointment.  The local FM station at the time used such  heavy-handed compression, that really, there is no difference between the loud and soft passages dynamically - and they were plagued with hiss on some of their broadcasts. ( I suppose with a little work that could be improved.) It blunts the effect of the performance which I don't find as affecting as the Vis performance anyway.  I miss the trumpet clams!  ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on October 03, 2012, 09:25:02 am
I haven't heard  Rakov's name in ages. I knew him (not personally of course) and his music was played somewhat. At least his name was known by teachers and students. I looked for him on the youtube (my favourite place):

http://youtu.be/8cdKFLYH_dY (http://youtu.be/8cdKFLYH_dY)

Our teachers liked us to play concert studies (whatever they were called). I don't  remember playing Rakov, but it sounds typical of that period. He was a really neglected composer.

Thank you for the information and for thread. It is like going back memory lanes for me.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on October 03, 2012, 09:36:22 am
This thread sent me into far away places in my memory. Peiko was a known composer. I think I  probably played his music.

I found this violin and piano phantasy on youtube and there are many other things available.

http://youtu.be/hXOgKzunYVc (http://youtu.be/hXOgKzunYVc)

It is strange to listen to this music after so many years and changes. A lot of it sounds good and interesting to me at the moment. Thanks once again for reminding me about Soviet composers.

I have someone here who can play balalaika.  There are people who can play dombra too.  They are a big help to their children who are learning piano (too bad they don't know bass clef).

I just remembered Myaskovsky... There is some interest in him now. He was amazing figure of course and great composer really. There is a new book coming out written by Zuk. He is from Cork and very good pianist too, studied in Cork and Durham and maybe in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

Here is information on Patrick Zuk. http://www.dur.ac.uk/music/staff/?id=4460 I don't know when his book is going to come out but am told that it is very significant book with much information unavailable or not known before. Myaskovsky was in the centre of musical life in Moscow for a very long time and friends with many interesting and significant people of that period. I am waiting for the book too.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on October 03, 2012, 11:11:00 am
Great to see you back posting with us, t-p   :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on October 04, 2012, 09:11:13 am
Great to be back! This thread made me go back into my memory and also to start looking what happened to some of the composers we used to play. Also one learns a lot by listening and watching how people play. For me it is especially interesting to hear string and other instrumentalists play (and also singers of course).

Also it puts me back in contact with my school so to say (I  do have many influences in my musical development and I did leave Russia rather early). There was an interesting article in the International Piano magazine, called 'Teaching at the top'. There was an interesting panel of pianists discussing different schools and they represented many different schools if I may say so. Now days people of different nationalities are teaching all over the  world and it is pointless to talk about pure schools etc. Never the less one can see and hear differences sometimes.

I was also listening to this Peiko piano Quintet:

http://youtu.be/wL1rK_Ni-os (http://youtu.be/wL1rK_Ni-os)

Here are some highlights from the article - Hong Kong is a highly commercial society, and many of the students seem to approach piano-playing in the same way, as if they were buying stocks  (Li MIng-Quang).

I have young kids playing repertoire that in my generation very few people could ever master .Eleven-year-olds playing Feux follets in a way that once only Ashkenazy and Berman and Richter could play it (Alexander Barginsky).

If I have to send a student to study abroad, I'd rather send them to Hong Kong than to Moscow . I remember a young pianist from Hong Kong who played Scriabin for me. hers was playing in the old Russian tradition. (Braginsky).

A Peiko symphony is available on youtube (I think it is number one).  It was interesting to hear the Prokofieff and Shostakovich influences there (and how one can combine both).


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Caostotale on October 23, 2012, 06:28:10 am
Thank you Sicmu for the Georgi Nyaga symphony. It's not that common to run across Moldovan music of any kind. Here's a stitch of biographical detail:

Born in Bucharest, Romania, the son of composer Stefan Nyaga (1900-1951). He studied violin at the Moscow Conservatory and composition with Leonid Gurov at the Kishinev (now Chisinau) Conservatory, remaining at the latter school as a teacher and administrator. His catalogue covers varied genres from opera to solo instrumental pieces. He wrote 2 other Symphonies, Nos. 1 (1957) and 3 (1983) as well as a Chamber Symphony for Solo Violin, Violins, Piano, Clarinet and Soprano (1982).

A works list is available at:
http://russiancomposers.org.uk/page903.html

A search through Worldcat suggests that his compositions featuring violin were pretty well-received. Aside from that, there's not much info to be found.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on October 23, 2012, 01:27:33 pm
Thank you Sicmu from me too. I enjoyed Nyaga symphony very much.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: ttle on October 23, 2012, 10:07:34 pm
Thank you Sicmu for the Georgi Nyaga symphony. It's not that common to run across Moldovan music of any kind. Here's a stitch of biographical detail:

Born in Bucharest, Romania, the son of composer Stefan Nyaga (1900-1951). He studied violin at the Moscow Conservatory and composition with Leonid Gurov at the Kishinev (now Chisinau) Conservatory, remaining at the latter school as a teacher and administrator. His catalogue covers varied genres from opera to solo instrumental pieces. He wrote 2 other Symphonies, Nos. 1 (1957) and 3 (1983) as well as a Chamber Symphony for Solo Violin, Violins, Piano, Clarinet and Soprano (1982).

A works list is available at:
http://russiancomposers.org.uk/page903.html

A search through Worldcat suggests that his compositions featuring violin were pretty well-received. Aside from that, there's not much info to be found.

Gheorghe Neaga ("Georgi Nyaga" is the standard reverse transliteration of the Russian transliteration...) passed away in 2003 in the USA. I recently found the score of his sonata for violin and piano in London, and shall let you know what I think once I have sight-read through it.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: ttle on October 23, 2012, 10:15:15 pm
I forgot to add that the conductor's full name is Timofei Gurtovoi (conducting the Orchestra simfonică a Filarmonica de Stat din Moldova).


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Elroel on October 23, 2012, 10:58:51 pm
Hi guys,

Let me join the chorus to hail Sicmu for this Neaga symphony.
And yes, I realised for the first time that Neaga is a Moldavian and they speak Romanian there. So we should use the Neaga.


Elroel


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on October 24, 2012, 10:22:30 am
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moldovan_language

It is probably safe to use Romanian spelling, but it is anyone's guess if his name will  remain with the same spelling. But for now it is ok I think. His name could have metamorphoses similar to Karakaraev. It is vagaries of history if you know what I mean.  ;)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Caostotale on October 24, 2012, 03:35:03 pm
I tend to go with whatever spelling most of their work is published under, so as to ease peoples' pains should they decide to seek out their works. This is probably a bit Russo-centric, but has always made things easier for me.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Elroel on October 24, 2012, 04:17:29 pm
Of course it is sometimes/most of the time (?) easier to use the "old" names. But they are all formed by transliteration to Russian and  from there to English, or whatever other language.
I feel, now that there are several independant countries, we should use the new forms, especially in the cases where the languages are written in Latin letters. Should the Moldavians  release a new cd, they  would use their way of writing the names, in case of Nyaga as Neaga.
We already found recordings from Armenian and Georgian composers in their 'non-russian' form. (Spendyarov is now Spendiarian, to name only one).
We'll see that in the near future more changing of names happen. F.i. the Ukrainian way of transliteration rules are different to the Russian methode.
But than again, it's no big issue.

Elroel



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Sicmu on October 24, 2012, 04:20:39 pm
I added the date of Nyaga's death to my post, to my knowledge besides his second symphony, Melodiya only recorded a Poem for orchestra and a string quartet by this very obscure composer. I only have his symphony and it shows once again that DSCH's influence was very strong among the composers of the soviet union.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Caostotale on October 24, 2012, 05:30:56 pm
Again, for me, the purpose is being able to find their scores, most of which were published in Moscow. If I were putting out a release, I would encourage using their native language name.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on October 24, 2012, 08:14:15 pm
Maybe it is good to give different spellings possible in parenthesis or something ?

I think it could help in some situations. Maybe in next edition one could use only one way or something?
It is difficult to presict the future, but there is great potential for confusion. Or may be it different spelling could be in the small script under?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: ttle on October 24, 2012, 09:08:39 pm
Maybe it is good to give different spellings possible in parenthesis or something ?

I think it could help in some situations. Maybe in next edition one could use only one way or something?
It is difficult to presict the future, but there is great potential for confusion. Or may be it different spelling could be in the small script under?

Indeed. I usually try to list spellings I encounter, as for instance here:
http://ttle.perso.neuf.fr/Symphonies/symphonistes_a-d.htm
and be consistent in the "preferred choice" (which should be self-evident when the language is originally written with Latin characters) but, to be honest, one cannot always keep track of all possible variants.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: ttle on November 01, 2012, 03:05:30 pm
Sergei Slonimsky:

Symphony No.32(2011)


http://www.mediafire.com/?y2ig8e07g8gi3f0 (http://www.mediafire.com/?y2ig8e07g8gi3f0)

The conductor is Vladimir Jurowski. I am not sure of the orchestra....perhaps you know ???

Radio Broadcast

If this is the premiere performance, then the orchestra must be the Symphony Orchestra of the Mikhailovsky Theatre:
http://www.worldconcerthall.com/en/schedule/slonimskys_80th_anniversary_with_a_world_premiere_from_st_petersburg/4579/


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: t-p on November 04, 2012, 03:43:59 pm
Thank you for Bortkewicz, sobral
http://youtu.be/oPXzTv-swnI


I am listening to the Rhapsody now.  It is interesting from historical point of view to know that composers were writing in such diverse styles  at approximately the same years .


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on November 04, 2012, 05:17:45 pm
Many thanks to sobral for his upload of Bortkiewicz's Russian Rhapsody :) :)! It is a piece I
have longed to hear for quite a while :).


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 05, 2012, 04:00:46 pm
Many thanks Sobral for Bortkiewicz's Russian Rhapsody! That piece has been number one on my wishlist ever since I heard Bhagwan Thadani's synthesized version.  It's a very exciting piece.

The Chernigiv Orchestra under Sukach tend to put out Bortkiewicz pieces in batches, so does this indicate that they have also released some other Bortkiewicz works?

I can't find any kind of website for them....


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on November 24, 2012, 09:08:25 pm
Thank you, Elroel, for Ovchinnikov's Symphony no. 1 and Suite no. 6 for orchestra :) :)!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on November 30, 2012, 08:41:37 pm
Thank you, rkhenderson, for the Shtoharenko Divertimento :) :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Sir-Disco on December 06, 2012, 11:52:06 pm
Thank you, Christopher.
Good job!
I was hunting this soundtrack past 2 weeks to no avail.

Could you please give me the description of the movie packaging itself, so I can identify the version with Nikolai Kryukov score?
The version available that can be identify with its score is the last version with the original score restore in 2011. But the other presiding versions don't tell much and I know that many just use three symphonies of Dmitri Shostakovich with No. 5 beginning and ending.
Any information in the cover of the movie you have ripped from could help me a lot.

Thank you very much for everything.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on December 07, 2012, 02:07:19 pm
Thank you, Christopher.
Good job!
I was hunting this soundtrack past 2 weeks to no avail.

Could you please give me the description of the movie packaging itself, so I can identify the version with Nikolai Kryukov score?
The version available that can be identify with its score is the last version with the original score restore in 2011. But the other presiding versions don't tell much and I know that many just use three symphonies of Dmitri Shostakovich with No. 5 beginning and ending.
Any information in the cover of the movie you have ripped from could help me a lot.

Thank you very much for everything.



I am glad you enjoy it - it's a great piece isn't it, very dramatic!   The cover looks like the one shown here - http://www.amazon.com/Battleship-Potemkin-The-Special-Edition/dp/B000V7HFL4/ref=pd_sim_sbs_m_1 (http://www.amazon.com/Battleship-Potemkin-The-Special-Edition/dp/B000V7HFL4/ref=pd_sim_sbs_m_1) - but you should still check it contains the Kryukov soundtrack and not just the Meisl.

See also  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0473053/ (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0473053/)

If you like Kryukov, do you know if there is an CD of his music?  I ripped the main tunes (Lullaby) from the Soviet movie Podkidysh and it's beautiful, so I am guessing his other music is worth exploration.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on January 08, 2013, 08:09:57 pm
Many thanks, Maris, for the three Brusilovsky pieces :) :)

FYI Symphony no. 6's full subtitle is On a Theme of Kurmangazy.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Latvian on January 08, 2013, 10:58:39 pm
Quote
Many thanks, Maris, for the three Brusilovsky pieces Smiley Smiley

I'll be interested to read what you think of them after listening!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Malito on January 10, 2013, 06:23:07 pm
I LOVED the Brusilovsky works.  Would love to have the 4th symphony if you can post it.  Also, would love to hear other works by him or anything else in that style.  These works made my day!  Thanks, Malito


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on January 10, 2013, 07:19:05 pm
Listening to the lovely ballet suite by  G. Grigorian - do we have a first name for him for my 'records' ? Googled without any obvious success !


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on January 10, 2013, 07:56:12 pm
Listening to the lovely ballet suite by  G. Grigorian - do we have a first name for him for my 'records' ? Googled without any obvious success !

"G." is "Grant", or sometimes in the Armenian version "Hrant". Born in 1919, died in 1961. The Suite dates from 1961, the Violin Concerto from 1954. Hope this helps!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 08:01:41 pm
I LOVED the Brusilovsky works.  Would love to have the 4th symphony if you can post it.  Also, would love to hear other works by him or anything else in that style.  These works made my day!  Thanks, Malito

Heartily seconded :)

Brusilovsky is emphatically NOT your average run-of-the-mill Soviet composer :)

...no, I'm not saying that most Soviet composers are run-of-the-mill, but there are a few who are (no names!) ;D

I also enjoyed the Grigorian works. Here's a (partial) worklist, which reveals that he composed a symphony as well: http://russiancomposers.org.uk/page522.html


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on January 10, 2013, 09:15:27 pm
Listening to the lovely ballet suite by  G. Grigorian - do we have a first name for him for my 'records' ? Googled without any obvious success !

"G." is "Grant", or sometimes in the Armenian version "Hrant". Born in 1919, died in 1961. The Suite dates from 1961, the Violin Concerto from 1954. Hope this helps!
Yup - ideal, thanks !


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on January 10, 2013, 10:06:40 pm
Listening to the lovely ballet suite by  G. Grigorian - do we have a first name for him for my 'records' ? Googled without any obvious success !

Adding to Holger's insightful comment, here is the link to Michael Herman's list of "RUSSIAN, SOVIET AND POST-SOVIET CONCERTOS" with some biographical information:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/Russian_and_Soviet_Discography/RUSSIAN_AND_SOVIET_CONCERTOS_1.htm#GRIGORIAN (http://www.musicweb-international.com/Russian_and_Soviet_Discography/RUSSIAN_AND_SOVIET_CONCERTOS_1.htm#GRIGORIAN)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Caostotale on January 10, 2013, 10:17:48 pm
Thanks for the Grigorian record (listening to the very 'wilderness-y' sounding concerto right now :) ). I don't know much of his work aside from a folksy set of 25 piano preludes he composed, but I like what I'm hearing here.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on January 12, 2013, 04:24:47 pm
Listening to the lovely ballet suite by  G. Grigorian - do we have a first name for him for my 'records' ? Googled without any obvious success !


and what are his dates?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on January 12, 2013, 05:38:07 pm
1919-1961.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Latvian on January 15, 2013, 06:40:30 pm
Quote
Yevgeni Stankovich(1942-):
Symphony No.6 "Dictum" for small orchestra(1987):
National Symphony Orchestra of the Ukraine(Volodymyr Sirenko)

Thanks, Colin, for uploading this!

The composer's name is more correctly transliterated as Yevhen Stankovych. During the years of the USSR, the Russian-speaking majority "Russified" all manner of names, places, etc., in the various constituent "republics." Some examples: in Latvia, "Kalnins" became Kalnin or Kalnyn. In Belarus, "Hlebau" became Glebov. In Azerbaijan "Hajibeyov" became Gadzhibekov. And on and on... What many folks don't realize is that when names such as these were transliterated into Russian, all too often these names were then further transliterated into English from the Russian, rather than going back to the original languages (Ukrainian, Latvian, etc.).

Anyway, I don't raise this issue to be petty or anal, and I don't fault you, Colin, or anyone else on this board. Goodness knows, it's taken me a while to catch on to some misspellings (or mistranslations, or mistransliterations, whatever the case may be) as well. I just feel the need to raise this issue periodically to keep everyone aware of the pitfalls of USSR-era nomenclature.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on January 15, 2013, 07:07:05 pm
Anyway, I don't raise this issue to be petty or anal, and I don't fault you, Colin, or anyone else on this board. Goodness knows, it's taken me a while to catch on to some misspellings (or mistranslations, or mistransliterations, whatever the case may be) as well. I just feel the need to raise this issue periodically to keep everyone aware of the pitfalls of USSR-era nomenclature.

Completely correct! Many errors have crept in over the years - it would be timely to catch and correct them when possible, without it becoming a witch-hunt ;)



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on January 15, 2013, 08:14:30 pm
Thanks from me as well, Colin, for the Stankovych piece :) His music is quite powerful, intense and haunting, especially the three symphonies on this Marco Polo disc, which I recommend highly:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Ex7XYc7lL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

 :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 16, 2013, 12:24:23 am
Thank you :)

I shall amend my catalogues accordingly.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 16, 2013, 04:21:41 pm
I have posted links to four symphonies by Alexander Lokshin-Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 8

These symphonies do not appear to have made it to cd.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on January 17, 2013, 11:48:49 pm
Thanks for the Stankovych Symphony but it is not the National Symphony Orchestra of the Ukraine but the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine. You would not say The National Symphony Orchestra of the France or the England, etc.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 18, 2013, 12:31:21 am
I stand corrected. The use of the term "The Ukraine" ceased when the republic ceased to be a constituent part of the USSR in 1991.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on January 18, 2013, 02:05:26 am
Thanks, Colin, I was unaware when the change took place.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on January 19, 2013, 12:21:56 am
I stand corrected. The use of the term "The Ukraine" ceased when the republic ceased to be a constituent part of the USSR in 1991.

It's way way more complicated than that!  Neil? Anyone? Care to explain?  I'm too tired!   :D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on January 19, 2013, 12:25:15 am
Quote
Yevgeni Stankovich(1942-):
Symphony No.6 "Dictum" for small orchestra(1987):
National Symphony Orchestra of the Ukraine(Volodymyr Sirenko)

Thanks, Colin, for uploading this!

The composer's name is more correctly transliterated as Yevhen Stankovych. During the years of the USSR, the Russian-speaking majority "Russified" all manner of names, places, etc., in the various constituent "republics." Some examples: in Latvia, "Kalnins" became Kalnin or Kalnyn. In Belarus, "Hlebau" became Glebov. In Azerbaijan "Hajibeyov" became Gadzhibekov. And on and on... What many folks don't realize is that when names such as these were transliterated into Russian, all too often these names were then further transliterated into English from the Russian, rather than going back to the original languages (Ukrainian, Latvian, etc.).

Anyway, I don't raise this issue to be petty or anal, and I don't fault you, Colin, or anyone else on this board. Goodness knows, it's taken me a while to catch on to some misspellings (or mistranslations, or mistransliterations, whatever the case may be) as well. I just feel the need to raise this issue periodically to keep everyone aware of the pitfalls of USSR-era nomenclature.


As an example of how this can cause confusion see my note in the thread http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,1593.0.html   (http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,1593.0.html) about the composer Belarusian composer Zalatarou (Belarusian transliteration) Zolotarev (Russian transliteration).



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on January 19, 2013, 12:38:38 am
Quote
Yevgeni Stankovich(1942-):
Symphony No.6 "Dictum" for small orchestra(1987):
National Symphony Orchestra of the Ukraine(Volodymyr Sirenko)

Thanks, Colin, for uploading this!

The composer's name is more correctly transliterated as Yevhen Stankovych. During the years of the USSR, the Russian-speaking majority "Russified" all manner of names, places, etc., in the various constituent "republics." Some examples: in Latvia, "Kalnins" became Kalnin or Kalnyn. In Belarus, "Hlebau" became Glebov. In Azerbaijan "Hajibeyov" became Gadzhibekov. And on and on... What many folks don't realize is that when names such as these were transliterated into Russian, all too often these names were then further transliterated into English from the Russian, rather than going back to the original languages (Ukrainian, Latvian, etc.).

Anyway, I don't raise this issue to be petty or anal, and I don't fault you, Colin, or anyone else on this board. Goodness knows, it's taken me a while to catch on to some misspellings (or mistranslations, or mistransliterations, whatever the case may be) as well. I just feel the need to raise this issue periodically to keep everyone aware of the pitfalls of USSR-era nomenclature.

I have a suggestion: when discussing a composer (or uploading his music) from a country that has a different alphabet, members should be encouraged to put both the standard (from Russian) transliteration of their name, and any other version of their name if the composer
is, say, Ukrainian/Belarusian/Armenian/Georgian etc. And maybe also copy in the Cyrillic version(s) - easy to do from Wikipedia.

One advantage of this is that it could draw in like-minded enthusiasts from Russia/Ukraine etc, if they have done a google search for Glebov/Hlebau they will come across our site.  Such users may know of all sorts of sources for information on, and recordings of, our beloved lesser known composers.

So, for example, if I was to upload a piece by the Belarusian composer Glebov, I might label it in the following way:

Glebov, Evgeniy Alexandrovich (transliteration from Russian)
Глебов, Евгеений Алексаандрович (Russian)
Hlebau, Yauhen Alyaksandravich (transliteration from Belarussian)
Глебаў, Яўген Аляксандравіч (Belarusian)



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on January 19, 2013, 02:36:24 am
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18233844 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18233844)

http://www.infoukes.com/faq/the_ukraine/ (http://www.infoukes.com/faq/the_ukraine/)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on January 19, 2013, 11:32:12 am
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18233844 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18233844)

http://www.infoukes.com/faq/the_ukraine/ (http://www.infoukes.com/faq/the_ukraine/)

Those partially address the issue. There is also the point that, in Russian, when they want to say "in" (eg: "in France") they use the word "v" - this applies to all countries except Ukraine, for which they use another word "na".  This has the effect of implying that Ukraine is not a country but a borderland (the Russian word "krai" means edge or borderland, so to say "na Ukraine" implies "at the edge" or "at the border area"). Russians sensitive to Ukrainian sensibilities now say "v Ukraine".   So in English to say "The Ukraine" is taken as analogous to that way of thinking.  It is also analogous to those (Brits) who still say "The Sudan" or pronounce Kenya as "Keenya"!

(It way well be the case that the name Ukraine arose from the word for borderland or edge. So what? That doesn't mean a whole culture or nation can't arise.  There is a theory that the name England has a similar history - Eng- from Angle, angle meaning corner or edge - the English were the people on the edge of Europe - but no one's going to tell me the English aren't a nation!)





Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Latvian on January 19, 2013, 01:36:26 pm
Quote
Those partially address the issue. There is also the point that, in Russian, when they want to say "in" (eg: "in France") they use the word "v" - this applies to all countries except Ukraine, for which they use another word "na".  This has the effect of implying that Ukraine is not a country but a borderland (the Russian word "krai" means edge or borderland). Russians sensitive to Ukrainian sensibilities now say "v Ukraine".   So in English to say "The Ukraine" is taken as analogous to that way of thinking.

A very important issue to keep in mind in all of this discussion is that in the former USSR, the various constituent "republics" were looked upon as an integral part of the country, despite exploiting their national characteristics when it suited the government, to give the illusion of multicultural freedom. Linguistically denying the validity of a country's or region's uniqueness, and therefore aspirations to independence, was just another subtle way of changing people's perceptions.

In my previous discussion, the Russification of names is just another aspect of this practice.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on February 25, 2013, 01:22:50 am
Thank you for the Peiko Symphony No.5, Holger :)

Hopefully you can add the Sixth when you have time :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on February 25, 2013, 01:31:16 am
Thank you for the Peiko Symphony No.5, Holger :)

Hopefully you can add the Sixth when you have time :)

Heartily seconded :) Peiko is one of the most underrated Soviet composers IMO.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: violinconcerto on March 11, 2013, 11:49:07 am
I am looking for a recording of teh work "Constanti" (or "Constants") by Leonid Hrabovsky (or Grabovsky) and found the following Ukrainian website that contains a huge compilation of chamber and orchestral music of him (and also the Constanti). I tried to register there to download, but for verification the site asks for "letters in a picture" (that did not show up on my computer) and the second letter of the Ukrainian alphabet (???). And maybe its all fake, so does anyone of you can register (or has the balls to register) and download?

Here's the link:

http://toloka.hurtom.com/viewtopic.php?t=20242

Best,
Tobias


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on March 12, 2013, 03:54:04 pm
Hello!

I had a quick look at the 'registration' page of this (very promising-looking!) Ukrainian website. I am not a Ukrainian speaker, but I speak pretty fluent Russian, and the differences - especially in the vocabulary of computer-sites, which is all new anyhow - are not too great :)

OK, if you go to the Registration page (you reach it by clicking "зарееструватися" on the topmost ribbon, it's the last-but-one command on that bar from the right)

The entry fields to register are as follows:

(top)
Login
E-mail (marked in English!)
password (ie you have to create one)
repeat the password
enter the numbers you see on the picture (nb there are only numbers, no Ukrainian letters!)
What is the second letter of the Ukrainian Alphabet?  (the answer is б - you can cut-paste it from here!)  (nb that's not the number six, but a Ukrainian letter 'b')


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Latvian on March 12, 2013, 07:20:49 pm
I tried a variety of passwords but it wouldn't accept any of them. Any thoughts?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: violinconcerto on March 12, 2013, 10:52:45 pm
I already received the file, so you don't have to download the files for me anymore. Just to say that.

Best,
Tobias


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: fr8nks on March 12, 2013, 11:34:16 pm
I was able to register without any problems. I chose a password that was six letters long without any capitals. Haven't tried to perform any searches yet but when I log in I see my user name.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Elroel on March 14, 2013, 09:36:10 am
Tried several times. But it did not work.
Followed Neil's advice, but that didn't do.

I gave up


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Latvian on March 14, 2013, 01:28:04 pm
I did succeed in registering, following Fr8nk's advice, but so far I haven't found anything of interest -- all pop music so far. Can anyone suggest a way to zero in on the meatier stuff?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on May 03, 2013, 10:16:50 pm
Many thanks for the Shchedrin Piano Concerto No.4-the only one of the five I did not have :)

(Now if only someone had the Symphony No.3 ;D)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dschfan on May 03, 2013, 10:44:46 pm
How about Piano Concerto no.6 op.119 on Onno van Rijen's site?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on May 03, 2013, 11:23:06 pm
You are quite correct, of course :-[

There is the Piano Concerto No.6 "Concerto lontano" for piano and string orchestra..........of which I do not possess a recording :(


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on July 06, 2013, 03:14:42 pm
Does anyone know anything about Gelmer Sinisalo  (1920–1989) ?

He seems to be of Finnish origin from the Karelian SSR area.

Dave



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on July 06, 2013, 03:23:14 pm
Here's a bio: http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/_/dict.aspx?rd=1&word=Sinisalo%2C+Gelmer-Rainer
And a worklist: http://www.russiancomposers.org.uk/page1078.html
His Symphony Heroes of the Forest is on YouTube and his Flute Concerto is on classical-music-online.net.

 :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on July 06, 2013, 03:36:40 pm
excellent  thanks!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Elroel on July 06, 2013, 05:28:20 pm
His Ballet 'Kizhi Legend'  is also on YT


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Elroel on July 06, 2013, 05:35:20 pm
I checked for the ballet and am sorry to say that it isn't there anymore.
It was a radio recording, so I'll upload it shortly to the forum.



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on July 16, 2013, 02:34:17 am
Yurasovsky, Aleksander Ivanovich (1890-1922) wrote an opera called Trilby, after George du Maurier's novel. I believe it hasn't been recorded in full, but in the Downloads section I have posted Svengali's Monologue, recorded by Alexander Pirogov (bass) with A. Orlov conducting. Orchestra unknown. Recorded in 1946. From a Melodiya LP collection of various Pirogov recordings.

Those (such as myself) who love Boris's Death Scene from Boris Godunov will love this also.  There is another recording from this opera (Billy's Aria) - which has been mentioned on this forum here - http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,2426.0.html (http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,2426.0.html) - I think they are both wonderfully dramatic pieces and give a tantalizing taste of what could be an amazing opera.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on July 31, 2013, 02:52:40 pm
Many thanks to Holger for the Peiko Symphony No.6 :) :)

I know that this was a piece I had been hoping that he would upload for quite some time and I am delighted to see it at last ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on July 31, 2013, 03:05:03 pm
Many thanks to Holger for the Peiko Symphony No.6 :) :)

I know that this was a piece I had been hoping that he would upload for quite some time and I am delighted to see it at last ;D

Colin, fine to hear that. With some more free time at the moment, fulfilling requests is much easier at present (as you probably already saw in case of Eklund's symphonies!). :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on July 31, 2013, 05:12:08 pm
Indeed, many thanks for the Peiko! He is among the most talented lesser-known Soviet symphonists.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on July 31, 2013, 10:06:39 pm
Wonderful, rkhenderson :)

Three more Peiko works :)

Christmas in July indeed ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Malito on August 02, 2013, 03:53:47 am
Yes, indeed!  My thanks for the Peiko works as well.  The symphony no. 5, symphony no. 6 and the symphony-concerto made for a nice almost 70-minute disc.  Thank you!!
Malito


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on September 02, 2013, 05:05:35 pm
The Goedicke Symphony upload has no link to allow downloading.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on September 02, 2013, 05:11:45 pm
The Goedicke Symphony upload has no link to allow downloading.

its now there.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on September 02, 2013, 05:23:54 pm
Thanks :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on September 02, 2013, 05:34:49 pm
Many, many thanks for the Goedicke :) I have always longed to hear one of his symphonies :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on September 02, 2013, 05:36:47 pm
Note:  I put some Soviet era Georgian music under the downloads for Country of Georgia. 

Enjoy...
Dave


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: rkhenderson on September 04, 2013, 08:35:36 pm
Thanks so much for the Goedicke symphony, I'd been looking for the piece for ages! It's
not quite as I expected, his musical style seems to have evolved from the pre-1900 pieces that
I have.
  Robert


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on September 05, 2013, 02:31:03 am
Thanks so much for the Goedicke symphony, I'd been looking for the piece for ages! It's
not quite as I expected, his musical style seems to have evolved from the pre-1900 pieces that
I have.
  Robert

you are welcome...its on the old CCCP label.. which is pre-melodiya and pre-MK


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: jowcol on September 12, 2013, 11:15:56 am
Many thanks for the Murad Kazhlayev Gorianka ("Daughter of the Mountains"), The First Suite from the Ballet,
This is a wonderful work, and I found myself listening to it five times yesterday while I was working.  I did some searching on him, and noticed he had a strong interest in Jazz. 
Then  I found this oddity.

http://youtu.be/gYpSI0zIDas (http://youtu.be/gYpSI0zIDas)

I don't read cyrillic, but is this the same composer?

I can say in all honesty, I've never heard a big band/funk/psychedelic Bossa Nova album before.  It's almost as if Antonio Carlos Jobim and Funkadelic have teamed up for a Big Band album, but it works in its own way.  (Or maybe I have poor taste...) The person that posted it has also posted some soviet era surf albums----






Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on September 12, 2013, 08:15:00 pm
yes in fact I have a jazz album on Melodiya of his.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on September 13, 2013, 01:26:42 pm
Since this discussion has branched out into Latin-influenced Azerbaijani jazz, here's a little bit of Rafiq Babaev:

http://youtu.be/PnifNIExxVQ (http://youtu.be/PnifNIExxVQ)  (youtube)

I was recently asked to translate the 'biographies' section of the new Dictionary of Azerbaijani Jazz
(not yet published).  Here's the section (reproduced with the permission of the publishers) on Babaev:

(NB this is NOT my text, and I can't take responsibility for its content or pedestrian style). I only translated the original material.

RAFIQ BABAEV
(1936 – 1994)

Rafiq Babaev was an outstanding leader in the world of Azeri jazz. He was a pianist, arranger and composer, whose name is inextricably linked with the rise of a national jazz style in Azerbaijan. He was a player who created a modern tradition, and encouraged a great number of young players. He always kept abreast of the times.

Even when people hadn't even thought of the idea of jazz-mugham as a genre of Azeri jazz, Rafiq had played his own composition “In The Bayaty-Kiurd Mode” in 1967 at the Tallinn International Jazz Festival – a piece in which he attempted to meld the declamatory style of mugham with jazz improvisation and structure. The radio jazz boffin Willis Conover gave this piece a glowing write-up, noting its mugham roots from the outset.
In the early 1970s, when there was no jazz-rock in Azerbaijan, and musicians all over the USSR were only just beginning to hear it, Babaev produced two amazing jazz-rock reworkings of Azeri folk melodies - “Gara gashyn vesmesi”, which translates roughly as “Dark eyebrows”, and “Dur gyal'”, approximating to “Come to me”. These experiments in jazz-rock prompted young musicians to go off in search of their own ideas for jazz-rock.

In the 1980s, when the role of soloists in the Baku Jazz Festival was becoming so prominent that the other instruments were just chugging away in the background, Rafiq tried the opposite, with a kind of ensemble-based jazz, with all the instruments contributing to the final result in their own significant way. This kind of jazz polyphony was used to great effect by the next generation of musicians – especially those who had taken composition courses.

In his final years, in the 1990s, Babaev experimented extensively with ethno-jazz, trying in each composition to combine jazz not only with mugham, but with all the other musical genres in Azerbaijani folklore. The result was a fascinating multi-layered synthesis, with astonishing freshness of colours – which laid down the basis for the kind of jazz that has followed it until the present day.
During his career Babaev wrote music for films, and for every possible combination of instruments with every kind of sound result.
Rafiq Babaev was born on 31st March 1936 in a family of a Party official called Farzi Babaev, and his wife Shakhbeinim Khanum. However, his father was remembered only anecdotally, since he had been arrested in 1937 for “anti-Party activities” and was shot as an “Enemy Of The People”.

Babaev began his artistic career with the stigma of being a “Son Of An Enemy Of The People”1 over his head.  A musical atmosphere reigned at home – in addition to Rafiq himself, three of his sisters and his elder brother all studied music. It was something that helped make up for their grief, and the extreme privations of their financial situation. Their mother did all she could to give the children the best kind of education and cultural upringing she could manage.

It was Babaev's older brother Oktai who first caught the jazz bug – a quite decent sax-player. An even greater influence were the radio broadcasts of Willis Conover on Voice Of America, in his program of jazz records. Yet even before Conover the brothers had already got their jazz fingers wet. At school in 1950 Rafiq had already formed a tiny jazz group, and played an American jazz piece for his exam at the strictly academic Music Academy in 1954. The culmination of this amusing academic background came in his Graduation Examination in 1959, when he was required to play the First Piano Concerto of Franz Liszt. When he reached the cadenza, instead of playing Liszt's solo passage, he played his own jazz improvisation. Professor Raouph Atakishev turned white on hearing it, declaring that “those notes aren't in Liszt's concerto!”.

While still a student at the conservatoire, Babaev began playing jazz programs in different nightclubs in Baku during the 1950s. In 1957 he gained notice throughout the USSR when he made a triumphant debut in the the World Youth & Student Festival in Moscow.
Overall, his performance in this Festival was a milestone in his career. After the festival, where he'd been heard by both Soviet and foreign musicians, Babaev gave more serious thought to what direction his own musical expression should take.  He began to be less interested in playing covers of Thelonius Monk, Bill Evans and Oscar Peterson, and was increasingly attracted in developing a musical language of his own.

He didn't have to search for long. The ancient strains of Azerbaijan's mugham music were beckoning him already.  After the festival, their moment had arrived. The search for an organic synthesis of jazz and mugham would henceforth occupy the rest of Rafiq's creative career.

This was especially so in the period during which he collaborated closely with the singer Rashid Behbudhov and his theatre songs, as musical director – a role he held, with small gaps, from 1966 to 1983.  He was also involved with mugham during his performances with the vocal group Gaya.

Finally in 1982 Babaev broke the jinx of being a “Son Of An Enemy Of The People” in 1982, and became a member of the Composer's Union of Azerbaijan. He added the job of artistic director and chief conductor of the Radio & Television Variety Symphony Orchestra in 1983.  He carried on his mugham-jazz synthesis exploration in his group Djangi, from 1991 onwards.

Babaev began his searches for this style by trying it out on the strictest festival juries. Everywhere – from Tallinn, Moscow, Kuibyshev to Tbilisi, in addition to walking off with the title of winner, he was showered in plaudits for the distinctive Babaev style. Occasionally it happened that the sounds of Babaev's jazz pieces was so very unusual that even professionals, gathering after the shows, began asking how it was actually possible? The highly-respected Moscow critic Alex Batashev, when Babaev's composition “Held Prisoner By Mugham”, was performed at the XII Moscow International Festival of Youth and Students in 1985, rushed backstage to find Babaev, and embrace him, saying “That was amazing! Fantastic! But tell me – how did you do it?”.

In fact it was done with daily rounds of working like a convict labourer. Babaev came from a background where nothing fell into his hands easily. He had to try things over and over again before they began sounding right. He hated coincidences, even in improvisation, and instead preferred endless thought and rehearsal. This is probably the reason why his music has a logical and intellectual feel.
Rafiq's musicians were as careful and thoughtful as he was himself. The composer and keyboardist Jamil Amirov said that Babaev didn't just work, or rehearse, but most of all, he TAUGHT.  He left behind him a real jazz 'school', whose members list-off as some of the most famous jazz-men in Azerbaijan - J. Amirov, S. Karimi, G. Stepanishev, A. Abbasov, EK Hasanov and Rauf Rain Sultanov, P. Adip, T. Dzhabbarov, B. Aliev, Cafaro, F. Ismailov.

Rafiq put out quite a few disks during his career. In 1966, the State All-Soviet Corporation Melodiya released “Jazz compositions based on melodies of George Gershwin, Louis Bonfil, Antony Hegarty, and Duke Ellington”. They also released Babaev's 1967 performance at the Tallinn Jazz Festival.  In 1970 they put out “Improvisations on tunes in Raouph Gajiev's operetta Cuba, Mon Amour”.  Melodiya also released a posthumous album called “Nostalgia”, put together by Amirov and Kerim.

After his death a number of further discs and records of Babaev's work were issued. The most complete of these was a set of eight cds, issued in 2008 by the Heydar Aliyev Foundation.

Babaev's death was tragic, sudden, and terrifying. He was blown up in a metro train that was bombed by Armenian terrorists on 19th March 1994.
Rafiq Babaev was a People's Artiste of Azerbaijan.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: jowcol on October 06, 2013, 07:34:04 pm
Music of Igor Stravinsky
(http://qph.is.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-60e782dd1c60c6c82784b9675717e2e0)

From the collection of Karl Miller

These are two large collections of works by Stravinsky here, totaling more than 25 CDs worth of music.  Rather than reproduce the contents here, I'll suggest you hurry over to the downloads section ASAP!!  I've listed him under Russian composers, but if there ever was an international composer, this was the man.


  • Stravinsky, the Man and the Music, the complete radio series.
  • Music of Stravinsky from Karl's Collection. 


 To my knowledge none of these works have been made commercially available in digital form.


In terms of extra information, let me offer the following. The infamous "mug shot" above is really Stravinsky's visa photo, as his contraversial arrangement of the Star spangled banner occurred in 1944- and it was not clear that he was ever arrested. So the notion that this was his mug shot is clearly an urban legend.   

ALso, a little more about the Jim Svedja radio series-- it is divided into 10 programs, and a set of LPs was pressed for each of the radio stations.  The world Cat listing for this collection is below:

On cover: Educational Broadcasting Associates presents ...
Complete transcriptions of radio broadcasts, featuring various interviews, narrative text, and musical examples by various performers; narrated by Jim Svejda.

14 sound discs : analog, 33 1/3 rpm, stereo. ; 12 in.

  • Program 1: Stravinsky the man (3 sides) --
  • Program 2: The character of the music (3 sides) --
  • Program 3: The Swiss years (3 sides) --
  • Program 4: The French years (3 sides) --
  • Program 5: The creative process (3 sides) --
  • Program 6: Stravinsky in America (3 sides) --
  • Program 7: Stravinsky the conductor (3 sides) --
  • Program 8: The serial years (3 sides) --
  • Program 9: Russian retrospective (3 sides) --
  • Program 10: The final years (3 sides).


This is listed out of stock at http://www.shugarecords.com (http://www.shugarecords.com), but the price for a used version is $1125.


Format 12" LP - 33 rpm
Year Pressed 1977
Record Label Educational Media Associates
Catalog # EMA 103
Country United States

(http://www.shugarecords.com/images/products/thumb/d807aff3-d43a-4787-b897-c3e1ece8b867-0.JPG)

(http://www.shugarecords.com/images/products/thumb/d807aff3-d43a-4787-b897-c3e1ece8b867-1.JPG)
(http://www.shugarecords.com/images/products/thumb/d807aff3-d43a-4787-b897-c3e1ece8b867-2.JPG)


Coming up next-- a staggering 22 disc compilation of works by a very prolific, underrecorded American composer-- two months in the making!!









Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Bobyor on October 15, 2013, 10:12:41 pm
Just listening to the Concerto-Symphony by Alexandrov. Thank you so much for this!
It is a great pleasure to hear my friend the brilliant VIKTOR BUNIN play this. He knew Alexandrov well, having met him through his teacher FEINBERG, whose music Viktor Vladimirovich has done much to promote. He invited me several times to Moscow to play in concerts in the Conservatoire in his teacher's memory. Once Merzhanov came to congratulate me. I have played a few of Alexandrov' pieces. There is one live recording on Danacord of a Nocturne.
A real pleasure to be amongst such generous and learned music-lovers!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on October 15, 2013, 10:17:39 pm
Just listening to the Concerto-Symphony by Alexandrov. Thank you so much for this!
It is a great pleasure to hear my friend the brilliant VIKTOR BUNIN play this. He knew Alexandrov well, having met him through his teacher FEINBERG, whose music Viktor Vladimirovich has done much to promote. He invited me several times to Moscow to play in concerts in the Conservatoire in his teacher's memory. Once Merzhanov came to congratulate me. I have played a few of Alexandrov' pieces. There is one live recording on Danacord of a Nocturne.
A real pleasure to be amongst such generous and learned music-lovers!

Bobyor, you might be interested to know that many of Alexandrov's piano pieces have been uploaded to YouTube (with score) on the channel of "fyrexianoff". Also, another channel uploaded a recording of his Piano Concerto, op. 174.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Bobyor on October 15, 2013, 10:24:36 pm
Hamish Milne recordings? But there's also Yakov Zak! I'll post my first sonata here (not perfect, but acceptable ...)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on October 15, 2013, 11:12:53 pm
Hamish Milne recordings? But there's also Yakov Zak! I'll post my first sonata here (not perfect, but acceptable ...)

Yes, but there's also non-commercially-available recordings on YT played by the composer, among others.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on October 16, 2013, 05:13:54 am
Just listening to the Concerto-Symphony by Alexandrov. Thank you so much for this!
It is a great pleasure to hear my friend the brilliant VIKTOR BUNIN play this. He knew Alexandrov well, having met him through his teacher FEINBERG, whose music Viktor Vladimirovich has done much to promote. He invited me several times to Moscow to play in concerts in the Conservatoire in his teacher's memory. Once Merzhanov came to congratulate me. I have played a few of Alexandrov' pieces. There is one live recording on Danacord of a Nocturne.
A real pleasure to be amongst such generous and learned music-lovers!

Yes, and another happy of Viktor Bunin from me - an extraordinary teacher, a wonderful pianist, and a charming man.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Gerard on October 16, 2013, 08:08:50 am
Obukhov and Protopopov - delight - indeed welcome Bobyor!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 30, 2013, 06:34:07 pm
Anatoi Alexandrov.... the Concerto-Symphony is marked as Op 102 on the LP and Op 101 on the score?  (see the score I posted).

I remember something being discussed about this on the Unsung Composers forum before they kicked me off for "not be romantic music"
but does anybody have any insight on this?  Such a lovely piece of music.  Naxos or Hyperion needs to record this again.
BTW I had some email exchanges between myself and Klaus Heymann .. he said it costs from  $8k-15k to record a symphonic work (probably depending on where you go... Uk or Ukraine)


Dave


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on December 08, 2013, 08:08:40 pm
note to Admin:   please move the discussion in the Download file for Russian and Soviet Music to this file... there is discussion in the last post.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cilgwyn on December 09, 2013, 12:33:21 pm
Anton Rubinstein: La Russie,morceaux symphonique

Thanks for this. Just had to download this after seeing the rave reviews at the other place! I must admit I do actually like some Rubinstein. What's wrong with a Russian composer who doesn't sound specifically Russian and who seeks his muse from German composers? It seems it's okay for Parry and Stanford and some other British composers who history has deemed of a lower rank,but not okay if you're a Russian! And if you are a Russian composer who is deemed to be of a lower order of inspiration,at least have the decency to sound like another Russian composer! IMHO Rubinstein is no worse than Parry and Stanford at their least inspired,if not better,and from what I've heard composed more interesting Piano concertos. Also,while I would hesitate to compare him with a composer as individual and of as obvious mastery as Tchaikovsky,whose music I do like;he's often allot less noisy and hectoring.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: kyjo on December 12, 2013, 02:55:31 am
Many thanks to rkhenderson for his upload of an interesting rarity, the Sokalsky symphony!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on December 12, 2013, 03:23:38 am
Anton Rubinstein: La Russie,morceaux symphonique

Thanks for this. Just had to download this after seeing the rave reviews at the other place! I must admit I do actually like some Rubinstein. What's wrong with a Russian composer who doesn't sound specifically Russian and who seeks his muse from German composers? It seems it's okay for Parry and Stanford and some other British composers who history has deemed of a lower rank,but not okay if you're a Russian! And if you are a Russian composer who is deemed to be of a lower order of inspiration,at least have the decency to sound like another Russian composer! IMHO Rubinstein is no worse than Parry and Stanford at their least inspired,if not better,and from what I've heard composed more interesting Piano concertos. Also,while I would hesitate to compare him with a composer as individual and of as obvious mastery as Tchaikovsky,whose music I do like;he's often allot less noisy and hectoring.

There is nothing per se "wrong" with a Russian composer composing music which does not sound particularly "Russian". Whatever exactly that might mean is open to debate-use of Russian folk-themes ??? (I suppose one would have to ask Balakirev....and he is not answering his telephone ;D). Seriously, there is a considerable difference, I would have thought, between most of Rubinstein's symphonies (I am not qualified to speak about his operas) and those of Balakirev or Borodin or Tchaikovsky.

That does not make Rubinstein a "bad composer". Balakirev and the other members of "The Mighty Handful" sought to emphasise a more explicitly Russian idiom rather than the German influence of Mendelssohn and Schumann one can hear in Rubinstein. That lead to criticism-sometimes quite vicious-of Rubinstein.

My criticism of Rubinstein-if that is what it is-is that I simply don't find the music very memorable. I don't find it unattractive. I recognise that Rubinstein could construct a symphony. I also fully accept that others may find his music pleasant to listen to.  Excellent :) Good on you! Keep listening! I shall stick to other Russian composers but that is equally just my choice :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on December 12, 2013, 08:50:42 am
There is nothing per se "wrong" with a Russian composer composing music which does not sound particularly "Russian". Whatever exactly that might mean is open to debate-use of Russian folk-themes ??? (I suppose one would have to ask Balakirev....and he is not answering his telephone ;D). Seriously, there is a considerable difference, I would have thought, between most of Rubinstein's symphonies (I am not qualified to speak about his operas) and those of Balakirev or Borodin or Tchaikovsky.

Unpalatable as it might be to some, we can't really 'get inside' this unless we look at the political situation in Russia at the time.

As you've rightly said, the sharp divide between Tchaikovksy (along with his somewhat reticent protector, Rubinstein) and the "Five" was drawn along politicised lines. Balakirev - perhaps motivated by his very modest abilities as a composer? - became very involved in Russian nationalist politics, and he associated with the most conservative figures of the time. He fervently believed that music 'per se' was not enough - it had to serve patriotic ends.  (Here he was following every 2nd-rater's dream - to make himself useful to the powers that be, so that he would receive 'official' commissions...  whilst those he labelled fifth-columnists would be disgraced and removed from the scene).

The first major confrontation was the premiere of Tchaikovsky's early opera THE OPRICHNIK. What did Balakirev find so offensive in it?

Some words first about the subject of this opera. The "Oprichniks" were the predecessors of the Russian secret police, and they date back to the C16th or earlier. It was the Oprichniks who carried out the insane decrees that made made Ivan IV's reign so Terrible. The most notorious was the psychopathic maniac Maliuta Skuratov - Ivan the Terrible's most murderous henchman. Yet the teaching of Russian history (which had only recently passed into academic hands, and out of the control of religious seminaries) had previously held that these men were brave and glorious patriots who were seeing off Russia's enemies. By the 1870s, a different view was forming... that the oprichniks had been criminal thugs working in the service of a Tsar who was... at best...  mentally ill. In Tchaikovsky's opera - to a libretto based on a novel by a Russian liberal named Lazhechnikov, who had died in 1869 - the oprichniks are portrayed as criminals, and not as heroes. A young man with no prospects joins them, in the hope that a successful career would make him a suitable suitor for his beloved girl. Instead, membership of the Order of Oprichniks destroys him. Criticism of Russia's feudal political system was barely concealed.

It was a red rag to a bull.  And to present this traitorous, anti-patriotic heresy in the Mariinsky Theatre - in the nation's capital of St Petersburg, in 1874, and then again in Moscow at the Bolshoi in the same year -drove Balakirev nearly insane with righteous indignation and wrath.

But it wasn't just the libretto which had the red mist forming in front of the eyes of the ultra-conservative faction. The music, and its format, came in for Balakirev's especial ire.  Most particularly because by 1874 his own musical career had collapsed entirely. His political ravings had sent him insane, and he'd spent a period in a lunatic asylum. Persistent complaints about his behaviour had caused him to be dismissed from the Free School of Music (Rimsky replaced him there), and by the time of OPRICHNIK Balakirev was working as a clerk at the Ministry of Railways - the only job he could find. And meanwhile the hated Tchaikovsky - his erstwhile friend - was getting commissions from Imperial theatres. And who was promoting the career of this Tchaikovsky?  Anton Rubinstein - a Jew. Jews held officially inferior status in Tsarist Russia, and there was even a different criminal code which applied only to them. Arrears of taxes, or even taking snuff were not criminal offences for slavic Russians - but the Penal Codex made such activities grounds for Siberian exile... for Jews.  Russian passports listed the 'nationality' of the passport holder. Russians were described as "Russian" - but Jews were listed separately as "Jews", as though they had no place in their own country of birth.

The triumphant success of the premierer of OPRICHNIK was immediate, and its composer was the toast of St Petersburg. Yet soon all kinds of anonymous letters and pamphlets appeared - chiding the public for their support of this 'disgraceful' piece. Wasn't it true that the story mocked the rule of a Russian Tsar, and held his wisdom up to question? Hadn't the music been composed in the genre of the French Grand Opera? In which all the expectations - a mezzo-soprano 'breeches role' for the hero's friend (think of HOFFMAN or FAUST), tone-poem interludes, and... ballets were dutifully included?  The musical material itself... why, dammit... it just wasn't slavic in style, feeling, or conception! And it had been promoted by Jews. The work was an affront to every right-thinking Russian!!   And of course, the anonymous author of these pamphlets and articles was a railway clerk and Russian nationalist named Mily Balakirev.

Within a week, Modeste Tchaikovsky had brought this repellent whispering campaign to his brother's attention - initially as a joke. But Piotr Tchaikovksy was, in his way, a devout patriot too...  and he was horrifically offended by what he read. He took the stinging criticism bitterly to heart.  Within two weeks, he had fallen into a deep depression, and became convinced he'd produced a monster.  Within months, he was petitioning the Bolshoi Theatre to strike the piece from their repertoire (they didn't). When this failed, he went to his publisher Jurgenson, and asked Jurgenson to destroy the copperplates of the score and parts. 

For most of his future theatrical works, Tchaikovsky was careful to use story material only from Russian writers whose works were taught in every school in Russia - primarily Pushkin. He worked 'slavic' themes into his works. He re-used old Russian romances (notably in The Queen Of Spades) to assert his patriotic stand.

But the nationalists had won - and it wasn't going to end there.





Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on December 12, 2013, 01:29:29 pm
Many thanks to rkhenderson for his upload of an interesting rarity, the Sokalsky symphony!

dandelion it, was beaten to the mark!  I ordered this LP at huge price via an ebay dealer and it arrived yesterday, and was so looking forward to making a contribution to this site(((


 :D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on December 12, 2013, 02:50:07 pm
Many, many thanks to Neil for his extremely interesting and detailed account of the historical/political background to the musical situation in Russia in 1874 :)

The more I read about Anton Rubinstein's career and, specifically, the reasons behind his resignation as Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory in 1867 and again in 1891 (the latter leading to his self-imposed exile from Russia until shortly before his death in 1894) the greater the sympathy I have for him.

The whole sad and sorry saga-so well-described by Neil-points out the importance and indeed necessity to understand this sort of cultural background within which composers worked. Rubinstein was an important figure in 19th century Russian music (for a number of different reasons). I don't happen to think that he was a great symphonist....but ultimately his claims to be remembered do not depend on that :)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cilgwyn on December 12, 2013, 02:52:57 pm
Anton Rubinstein: La Russie,morceaux symphonique

Thanks for this. Just had to download this after seeing the rave reviews at the other place! I must admit I do actually like some Rubinstein. What's wrong with a Russian composer who doesn't sound specifically Russian and who seeks his muse from German composers? It seems it's okay for Parry and Stanford and some other British composers who history has deemed of a lower rank,but not okay if you're a Russian! And if you are a Russian composer who is deemed to be of a lower order of inspiration,at least have the decency to sound like another Russian composer! IMHO Rubinstein is no worse than Parry and Stanford at their least inspired,if not better,and from what I've heard composed more interesting Piano concertos. Also,while I would hesitate to compare him with a composer as individual and of as obvious mastery as Tchaikovsky,whose music I do like;he's often allot less noisy and hectoring.

There is nothing per se "wrong" with a Russian composer composing music which does not sound particularly "Russian". Whatever exactly that might mean is open to debate-use of Russian folk-themes ??? (I suppose one would have to ask Balakirev....and he is not answering his telephone ;D). Seriously, there is a considerable difference, I would have thought, between most of Rubinstein's symphonies (I am not qualified to speak about his operas) and those of Balakirev or Borodin or Tchaikovsky.

That does not make Rubinstein a "bad composer". Balakirev and the other members of "The Mighty Handful" sought to emphasise a more explicitly Russian idiom rather than the German influence of Mendelssohn and Schumann one can hear in Rubinstein. That lead to criticism-sometimes quite vicious-of Rubinstein.

My criticism of Rubinstein-if that is what it is-is that I simply don't find the music very memorable. I don't find it unattractive. I recognise that Rubinstein could construct a symphony. I also fully accept that others may find his music pleasant to listen to.  Excellent :) Good on you! Keep listening! I shall stick to other Russian composers but that is equally just my choice :)
Thank you Dundonnell,I will! ;D Someone's got to stick up for him (or his ghost,anyway)! (Now he's got about two fans!!) I've certainly heard worse (and allot better! ;D). Judging by No5,he might have benefited from being more consciously Russian,more often. But it's too late now. For my money anyway,IMO his symphonies are preferable to Stanford at his weakest;No's 1 & 2 (though,perhaps they don't count) and No7 (talk about looking back!!) Let's face it Stanford's under the influence of various foreign composers in most of his music,although,unlike,Rubinstein,he was presumably trying to escape from that! And then there's the case of Granville Bantock;not exactly the most forward looking composer! Okay,we might have a high opinion of Bantock here;but allot of critics would say the same things about him as we're saying about Rubinstein! (Not saying I agree with them) Let me see? Bits of Wagner,Strauss,Liszt and Scotch mist (or heather?),amongst other choice morsels,I've encountered!! And we're talking about music composed in the 30s and 40s!  Of course,we all know here that Bantock is a much finer and more original composer than Rubinstein,and it's alright for him to look backwards and not assimilate his influences quite as successfully as Elgar and Vaughan Williams!

And yes,I DO prefer Parry,Stanford,Bantock....(and Tchaikovsky ;D ) to Rubinstein!  I'm just making a point!
I have to say,some of the recordings of Rubinstein's music probably don't help (the Piano concertos aside). And if only they had invented recording technology a little earlier. If we could hear him playing we might have a higher opinion. Well,of his playing,anyway! ::) ;D

Typing all this,I can't help thinking of Arthur Rubinstein with a wry grin! ;D




Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on December 12, 2013, 10:50:27 pm
VLADMIR SOKALSKY
(1863-1919, UKRAINE)

Symphony in G minor (1892)
I. Allegro
II. Presto giocoso - Scherzo
III. Andante
IV. Vivace (Kazachok)

Natan Rakhlin/Ukrainian State Symphony Orchestra
MELODIYA 33ND-03696-7 (LP) (1957)

http://www.mediafire.com/download/0kyur2cvuvfi6h2/Sokalsky.m4a




Thank you very much for this!   Do you by any chance have the cover and the back notes?  The copy that I just bought off ebay (see above....!) unfortunately came without...


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on December 13, 2013, 04:50:11 am
Many, many thanks to Neil for his extremely interesting and detailed account of the historical/political background to the musical situation in Russia in 1874 :)

The more I read about Anton Rubinstein's career and, specifically, the reasons behind his resignation as Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory in 1867 and again in 1891 (the latter leading to his self-imposed exile from Russia until shortly before his death in 1894) the greater the sympathy I have for him.

The whole sad and sorry saga-so well-described by Neil-points out the importance and indeed necessity to understand this sort of cultural background within which composers worked. Rubinstein was an important figure in 19th century Russian music (for a number of different reasons). I don't happen to think that he was a great symphonist....but ultimately his claims to be remembered do not depend on that :)

I second that !!  Thanks Neil for your insight... I seem to remember reading about all of this years ago... the conflict between the Rubinstein-Tchaikovsky faction and the Nationalist faction.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: jowcol on March 13, 2014, 01:18:07 am
Boris Terentiev: Symphony 1
(http://www.russian-records.com/data/samples/350/Podolsk.jpg)

I have been able to find out very little about Terentiev, other than enough to think
he was known primarily being a writer of songs.

From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony 1
Latvian State SO/Vasili Smalsky


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on March 13, 2014, 04:49:39 am
Boris Terentiev: Symphony 1
(http://www.russian-records.com/data/samples/350/Podolsk.jpg)

I have been able to find out very little about Terentiev, other than enough to think
he was known primarily being a writer of songs.  I'm assuming this recording was a 78?   also the label is pre-Melodiya

From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony 1
Latvian State SO/Vasili Smalsky


Boris Terentiev   Grad from the Kiev Conservatory in 1931 and 1937 from the Moscow Conservatory. Studied with Gliere and Litinsky  Sym No 1 dated 1937 no 2 1987.  Born 1913 Odessa Ukraine.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on March 13, 2014, 04:53:47 am
by the way... who is Karl Miller?   


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on March 13, 2014, 09:33:58 am
Hi all,

if you do a Google search in Russian you will find more on Terentiev. There is this site, for instance:
http://www.kino-teatr.ru/kino/composer/sov/248532/bio/
It tells us Terentiev was born in 1913 and died in 1989. It just lists one symphony and gives 1985 as a date. I am pretty sure this will be the one we have - I am just giving it a listen and this doesn't sound like Soviet music from the 1930s or so, it rather has something filmic. By the way, this recording cannot come from an early 78 - it's clearly stereo!

As for who Karl Miller is, he is another collector of music with an extensive collection. I am also exchanging music with him myself, and in fact, I only recently asked him for quite a batch of music including symphonies by Eklund, Lundquist, Terentiev, Trojahn and others. I am still waiting for the parcel as the delivery from the US to Germany seems to take quite some time once again, however it seems he also forwarded copies to jowcol, so that I can already enjoy the music now (while still awaiting the arrival of my own copies)...


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on March 13, 2014, 11:33:15 am
One more remark about this recording: the conductor must by Vassily Sinaisky. He was chief conductor of the Latvian National Symphony Orchestra for quite a long time (1976–89).

I checked several Russian sources again. Actually, most of them do list only one symphony but some say it was composed in 1937, others say in 1985. Of course, there is no perfect evidence about what is correct after all. There might be two symphonies as Lee's Russian Composers site suggests (maybe a kind of early study symphony) or there might be just one symphony (one possibility would be a later revision of an early work) - but what I do believe is (as I already stated above) that the work we hear in our recording is not from 1937, it is just not in the overall spirit of Soviet symphonies of that time.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on March 13, 2014, 01:15:25 pm
my source was Dr Ho and Feofanov 


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Amphissa on May 11, 2014, 09:20:58 pm

Boris Terentiev is listed on Classical Music Archive as living 1913-1979. Obviously, if those dates are correct, the symphony could not possibly have been composed in 1985.

There are 7 additional pieces by him available there, including a couple of chamber music pieces. However, I'm not a paying member of the site, so I cannot comment on their quality.

http://classical-music-online.net/en/composer/Terentiev/4906 (http://classical-music-online.net/en/composer/Terentiev/4906)



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Holger on May 12, 2014, 07:49:18 am
Thanks for your hint, Amphissa, which lead me into some further research. I had never read the 1979 date anywhere before and actually, I have found out that it is definitely an error. Besides several articles / data base entries which always give 1989 as year of death, there is even a photo of Terentiev's tombstone online which finally proves 1989:
http://moscow-tombs.ru/1989/terentyev_bm.htm (http://moscow-tombs.ru/1989/terentyev_bm.htm)

So I remain pretty much convinced the symphony is from 1985. I am not a paying member of the Classical Music site either (yet), but I guess the pieces they offer should be quite small in scope. Actually, from all I read Terentiev should have composed quite a large amount of music of lighter fashion. He is certainly no major figure in Soviet music but I find it pretty interesting also to have the chance to check what more obscure composers like him did.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on May 12, 2014, 10:16:34 am
I am not a paying member of the Classical Music site either (yet), but I guess the pieces they offer should be quite small in scope.

Best $20-odd I've spent in a long time, gentlemen, with 500 or so downloads so far to show for it !


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Elroel on May 12, 2014, 03:03:14 pm
Fully agree with mr C. It is worth the money, and I may have told this before: they even answer some questions of mine.
So Holger, I think you should consider paying them. It's worth it.
No symphony of Terentiev there though. Listening to the sympphony now, it think Holger is right about the timing. Definitely no 1930's work, or a work of a 24 years old composer.

The tombstone is pretty much convincing to.

On 'Music online' site, the info is given by the uploader. He or she must have made a typing error. I'll ask Onno van Rijen (of Soviet Composers-site) if he perhaps has more info. He is reasonably well informed.
On ttle's listing (from earlier this year) no: Terentiev symphony is mentioned.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 29, 2014, 05:19:22 am
http://www.crotchet.co.uk/multibuy-5008.html?utm_source=1406e&utm_medium=email

expanded catalogue of Melodiya from Crotchet.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Amphissa on October 08, 2014, 04:46:29 am
Uploaded a new performance of Myaskovsky's 4th Symphony.



Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Gauk on October 09, 2014, 06:23:30 pm
Nice to know his symphonies aren't totally forgotten in the concert hall.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on October 09, 2014, 11:10:16 pm
Nice to know his symphonies aren't totally forgotten in the concert hall.
No 4 is a strange piece with a strange dissonant theme oft repeated..was a rarity till Svetlanov did it..Mia is my favorite composer..


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Gauk on October 10, 2014, 11:29:31 am
One of my favourites also. Back in the old days hearing any of his work was very difficult. Then I happened to be browsing a music shop in Sapporo and what should I see but a box set of the complete symphonies! This was exciting, but I was travelling light at the time and carrying it would be difficult. So, I reasoned, it was enough to know such a thing had been released; once I got home I could order it up. Then once I did get home, there was no sign of it! I could not find any trace of the set ever having been released, yet I had seen it.

Of course, eventually it did beome available in Europe, but that was some years later.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Greg K on October 12, 2014, 12:26:37 am
Anyone here yet acquired Gregor Tassie's recently issued 400+ page biography "Nikolay Myaskovsky: The Conscence of Russian Music"?  Wished for a work like this for many years, but so pricey I've delayed purchasing somewhat longer than I otherwise would have.  Unlike Shostakovich and Prokofiev,  Miaskovsky has always been a rather taciturn and mysterious figure, without a bold public profile, and about whose personal life little seemed apparently known.  Hoping Tassie's study might part the curtain a bit and offer insights.  It's rumored one of the photos even shows Miaskovsky with a smile.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Amphissa on October 12, 2014, 08:12:26 pm
Yes, Tassie's book really is expensive. I am hoping for a paperback edition that I can afford.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on October 14, 2014, 04:36:39 am
Nikolai Myaskovsky
Symphony No. 4 in E Minor, op. 17

Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra
Valery Gergiev, conductor

Doelen Concert Hall, Rotterdam

14 September 2014

https://www.mediafire.com/?v1tp9j76mrlxnxn (https://www.mediafire.com/?v1tp9j76mrlxnxn)

Mia's 4th was one of his most neglected pieces and for a long while was unavailable until Svetlanov did it as part of the entite cycle for Warner.
It has a simple, eerie recurring theme which will linger in the mind long after the music is done.
I'm very eager to hear how the Dutch in Rotterdam do it..


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: tapiola on October 14, 2014, 05:26:09 am
Shaporin's "The Battle for Russia" comes in at 79:56 and my CD-R will not take the whole download. Is there a way to shave a few seconds off so the work will fit on one CD or to divide it between two CDs?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on October 14, 2014, 09:28:08 am
Shaporin's "The Battle for Russia" comes in at 79:56 and my CD-R will not take the whole download. Is there a way to shave a few seconds off so the work will fit on one CD or to divide it between two CDs?


"Christopher, thank you so much for the Shaporin uploads. 'The Battle for Russia' comes in at 79:56 and my CD-R will not take the whole download. Is there a way to shave a few seconds off so the work will fit on one CD or to divide it between two CDs?"


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: tapiola on October 15, 2014, 04:08:17 am
So, I will not be able to download it.
Thank you for that.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on October 15, 2014, 12:25:17 pm
So, I will not be able to download it.
Thank you for that.


For real?!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on October 15, 2014, 12:31:14 pm
So, I will not be able to download it.
Thank you for that.

If you have the time and inclination, save the file on your computer.  Then open it in this free programme - http://mp3cut.net/ (http://mp3cut.net/) - you will see how to make the cuts.  The timings are:

Track 1:

  01 Prologue (4:57)
  02. I. Dmitry Donskoy and choir (9:33)
  03. II. Cavatina Bride (5:13)
  04. III. Choir 'At night, when my mother lay down a horde' (10:53)
  05. IV. Arioso Dmitry Donskoy (4:25)
  06. V. Ballad Knight 'Again with the age-old yearning' (6:34)
  07. VI. Choir Tatars 'Go century' (7:37)

Track 2:

  08. VII. Lullaby mother (11:04)
  09. VIII. Choir messengers with Vityaz (4:36)
  10. Epilogue (11:16)

Feel free to upload your cuts here!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: tapiola on October 15, 2014, 01:53:02 pm
Christopher, thank you very much!
I will give it a try.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: calyptorhynchus on November 05, 2014, 09:49:56 pm
Thanks BrianA for those Bunin symphonies. I enjoyed them very much, I like his concise, but not unemotional style. Russian and Soviet composers are/were not known for their concision, but Bunin is an exception.

I also found his first symphony on YouTube.

BTW there are two Bunins who composed, Revol Bunin (1924-76), the author of these symphonies, and a Vladimir Bunin (1908-70) who is represented by one disk in the catalogue (whose music I haven't heard).


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: BrianA on November 05, 2014, 10:26:09 pm
Calyptorhynchus, coincidentally I discovered Bunin's First on youtube within the last couple of days as well.  That happy accident is probably the highlight of my week so far...

I know of Vladimir but like you don't know his music.  I have, however, managed to embarrass myself once or twice by confusing Vladimir with Revol.

Brian


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: rkhenderson on November 06, 2014, 06:26:34 pm
The symphony on YouTube is by Vladimir Bunin.
Compare:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=WVnFtEMi624
and
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QhnFH99g3uA

I don't think Revol Bunin's symphonies have been recorded apart from 4,5,6 and 8


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: BrianA on November 06, 2014, 07:09:27 pm
Good catch, RK.  I was just coming back on the forum to point this out only to find out that you had beat me to it.  I thought it was too good to be true and I guess it was.

On the other hand it's oddly reassuring to know that I'm not the only one who's managed to confuse these two composers...


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: BrianA on November 06, 2014, 07:11:01 pm
PS:  Is there actually a recording of no 4 out there somewhere?  I only have 5, 6, and 8.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: rkhenderson on November 06, 2014, 08:25:00 pm
You're right, only 5, 6 and 8 have been recorded. I admire Revol Bunin's music very much too and
would greatly appreciate modern recordings of any of his works. However, I fear he has slipped into
obscurity. Revol Bunin, Nikolai Peiko and Veniamin Basner all have distinctive voices but as contemporaries of Shostakovich have been overshadowed and forgotten.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: calyptorhynchus on November 07, 2014, 08:31:10 am
How embarrassing to lecture evyone on the two Bunins and then confuse them myself.

Should have guessed, that symphony on YouTube is 38 minutes long, not concise at all.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Gauk on November 07, 2014, 08:48:42 am
My thanks also for the posting of those Bunin symphonies. The odd thing is, No 5 sounds extremely familiar, yet I cannot work out where I might have heard it. I don't have the LP, and I can't find any previous download of it.

Towards the end of the scherzo there is a passage that reminds me rather of Satie's "Parade".


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 07, 2014, 11:00:58 am
Revol Bunin's Concerto in G minor, for chamber orchestra, Op. 33 was part of the Historical Russian Archives series, along with his 5th symphony. Rudolf Barshai conducting. (Concerto for what I don't know....can one have simply a concerto? Am I revealing ignorance?!)  If you don't want to fork out a large sum of money for the HRA boxsets (and they are not cheap) you can buy the pieces individually on Itunes.  However, some pieces (Bunin's concerto included) have been split into multiple tracks even if they are a one movement piece, and even where on the CD they are one track.  So you pay more.  I've ranted about this previously I believe....!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on November 15, 2014, 11:45:46 pm
Thanks, Christopher, for uploading the excerpts from Dobrynya Nikitich. I have a similar selection of excerpts performed and broadcast around Grechaninovs 125th birthday. I didn't know about this recording.
You didn't upload the Dances (No 20). Did you miss it or have they probably been released commercially?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 16, 2014, 12:06:53 am
Thanks, Christopher, for uploading the excerpts from Dobrynya Nikitich. I have a similar selection of excerpts performed and broadcast around Grechaninovs 125th birthday. I didn't know about this recording.
You didn't upload the Dances (No 20). Did you miss it or have they probably been released commercially?



Have another look.... Which recording do you have?  Do you know if the complete opera has been recorded?


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on November 16, 2014, 12:33:01 am
Ah, thanks! You changed the whole contents of the folder?

My recording is from a live concert to celebrate the 125th birthday of the composer. The conductor was the same, Andropov, also the soloist Raisa Kotova.
It's a German broadcast of a Russian Concert, so the announcements are in German and it's difficult for me to transcribe the Russian names of the performers in written English.
Perhaps I can compare both recordings later this week. Probably these are the same excerpts. My recording takes nearly 39 minutes.

A while ago I listened to another version at classical-music-online.net but the orchestra consisted of some kind of folk instruments or so concducted by Georgy Doniyakh. It took nearly an hour.

Sorry, I don't know if a complete recording exists.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on November 16, 2014, 11:31:44 am
I have now compared our recordings. Apart from a re-ordering of the dances and the omission of the last number (III. Act Dobrynyas Song) my recording has the same excerpts as yours.
Also the tempi differ somewhat.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 16, 2014, 02:40:30 pm
Shaporin's "The Battle for Russia" comes in at 79:56 and my CD-R will not take the whole download. Is there a way to shave a few seconds off so the work will fit on one CD or to divide it between two CDs?

I have now split this into its 10 constituent tracks. Enjoy.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 17, 2014, 10:46:29 am
Some of the music from MELODIYA LPs which I have recently posted up is by the Soviet composer Isaak Dunayevsky (1900-1955).  Most of his music falls into the light music category.  Some however could fairly be regarded as crossing the line over into jazz.  But I decided to post the LPs as they are with all their pieces, whichever category the different pieces might fall into.

Given that he was writing in the USSR's darkest decades (20s, 30s, 40s and early 50s), it's a wonder that he was able to write such light music.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 19, 2014, 09:29:00 am
Some information on Gotfrid Hasanov, whose Piano Concerto No.1 I posted yesterday below.  He also has Wikipedia pages in English, Russian and German.

http://memim.com/gotfrid-hasanov.html (http://memim.com/gotfrid-hasanov.html)

Gotfrid Alidin chwa Gasanov (Russian Готфрид Алиевич Гасанов; born May 1, 1900 in Derbent, † May 28, 1965 in Moscow) was a Soviet musician and composer lesginischer origin.

Gasanov was born on 1 May 1900 in Derbent, his father was Lesgine, his mother German. In 1926 he joined the Leningrad Conservatory in piano and composition. In the same year he taught in Bujnaksk in Dagestan, the first music school. He taught piano in Makhachkala, Samara and Leningrad, and gave solo concerts. 1935 to 1938 and again from 1947 to 1953 he was artistic director of the Song and Dance Ensemble of the Republic of Dagestan; 1943-1947 he was head of the music division of the kumükischen musical theater.

Gasanov regarded as the founder of professional music in Dagestan, he composed numerous Dagestani operas, ballets and musical comedies. The music school in Makhachkala bears his name.




Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 19, 2014, 03:22:44 pm
Some information on Gotfrid Hasanov, whose Piano Concerto No.1 I posted yesterday below.  He also has Wikipedia pages in English, Russian and German.

http://memim.com/gotfrid-hasanov.html (http://memim.com/gotfrid-hasanov.html)

Gotfrid Alidin chwa Gasanov (Russian Готфрид Алиевич Гасанов; born May 1, 1900 in Derbent, † May 28, 1965 in Moscow) was a Soviet musician and composer lesginischer origin.

Gasanov was born on 1 May 1900 in Derbent, his father was Lesgine, his mother German. In 1926 he joined the Leningrad Conservatory in piano and composition. In the same year he taught in Bujnaksk in Dagestan, the first music school. He taught piano in Makhachkala, Samara and Leningrad, and gave solo concerts. 1935 to 1938 and again from 1947 to 1953 he was artistic director of the Song and Dance Ensemble of the Republic of Dagestan; 1943-1947 he was head of the music division of the kumükischen musical theater.

Gasanov regarded as the founder of professional music in Dagestan, he composed numerous Dagestani operas, ballets and musical comedies. The music school in Makhachkala bears his name.






His music is also on CD at http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories/music/AudioPages/CMA/cma_contents.html


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 19, 2014, 03:24:46 pm
Some information on Gotfrid Hasanov, whose Piano Concerto No.1 I posted yesterday below.  He also has Wikipedia pages in English, Russian and German.

http://memim.com/gotfrid-hasanov.html (http://memim.com/gotfrid-hasanov.html)

Gotfrid Alidin chwa Gasanov (Russian Готфрид Алиевич Гасанов; born May 1, 1900 in Derbent, † May 28, 1965 in Moscow) was a Soviet musician and composer lesginischer origin.

Gasanov was born on 1 May 1900 in Derbent, his father was Lesgine, his mother German. In 1926 he joined the Leningrad Conservatory in piano and composition. In the same year he taught in Bujnaksk in Dagestan, the first music school. He taught piano in Makhachkala, Samara and Leningrad, and gave solo concerts. 1935 to 1938 and again from 1947 to 1953 he was artistic director of the Song and Dance Ensemble of the Republic of Dagestan; 1943-1947 he was head of the music division of the kumükischen musical theater.

Gasanov regarded as the founder of professional music in Dagestan, he composed numerous Dagestani operas, ballets and musical comedies. The music school in Makhachkala bears his name.






His music is also on CD at http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories/music/AudioPages/CMA/cma_contents.html

This CD collection is a great survey of the music from Azerbaijan.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on November 19, 2014, 03:40:43 pm

His music is also on CD at http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories/music/AudioPages/CMA/cma_contents.html


Is it?  I don't see it on the list shown there....


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 19, 2014, 08:42:53 pm

His music is also on CD at http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories/music/AudioPages/CMA/cma_contents.html


Is it?  I don't see it on the list shown there....

uggh... let me find it.. I purchased a copy back in 2001 from this website.  It was a new recording of the Az Sym Orch.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Neil McGowan on November 19, 2014, 09:25:59 pm
Given that he was writing in the USSR's darkest decades (20s, 30s, 40s and early 50s), it's a wonder that he was able to write such light music.

Some would also see exactly the same scenario as being exactly the reason he wrote such light music ;)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 22, 2014, 07:53:55 pm

His music is also on CD at http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories/music/AudioPages/CMA/cma_contents.html


Is it?  I don't see it on the list shown there....

uggh... let me find it.. I purchased a copy back in 2001 from this website.  It was a new recording of the Az Sym Orch.


Here is the review of the CD:  http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/May03/Badalbeyli_piano.htm


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 22, 2014, 07:57:59 pm
This CD came out in 2004. I believe I bought it after reading this review in musicweb:


Gotfrid HASANOV
Piano Concerto [27.40]
Farhad Badalbeyli (piano)
BP&TV SO/Ramiz Melik-Aslanov

the jacket says it is printed by Sony in the EU.  Farhad Badalbeli "My Piano"


Read more: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/May03/Badalbeyli_piano.htm#ixzz3JpSqHdkb


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on November 22, 2014, 08:01:07 pm
This CD came out in 2004. I believe I bought it after reading this review in musicweb:


Gotfrid HASANOV
Piano Concerto [27.40]
Farhad Badalbeyli (piano)
BP&TV SO/Ramiz Melik-Aslanov

the jacket says it is printed by Sony in the EU.  Farhad Badalbeli "My Piano"


Read more: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/May03/Badalbeyli_piano.htm#ixzz3JpSqHdkb


Here is the link to buy the CD:
http://azer.com/aiweb/categories/music/AudioPages/Badalbeyli/badalbeyli.html






Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on December 26, 2014, 06:52:42 pm
Christopher, I am just listening to your uploads of the Grechaninov excerpts from Dobrynya Nikitich.
Something is wrong with the Act I introduction: after 45 seconds there is a big silent gap of about 1 min 40 sec.
I tried to cut the silence but the bits did not join, so the music must have been going on.
I have downloaded the file two times but the same problem occurs. Sorry.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Caostotale on January 16, 2015, 07:23:57 pm
Given that he was writing in the USSR's darkest decades (20s, 30s, 40s and early 50s), it's a wonder that he was able to write such light music.

Some would also see exactly the same scenario as being exactly the reason he wrote such light music ;)

Agreed. With quite a bit of the work from the 30s-50s, and especially works from the Soviet territories outside of Russia, the brisk writing style, emphases on unambiguous folk materials, unabashed virtuosity, etc.. was simply required if one wanted to maintain a music career. Soviet composers simply didn't have the Western luxury of being able to openly react to the mood of the times.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: jowcol on September 03, 2015, 03:47:14 pm
Under the "United States" composers downloads, I post a collection of Karl Miller's tracks of American Pianist Byron Janis's interpretations of Prokofiev's Third Piano concerto and Tchaikovsky's first.  Enjoy.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Gauk on October 14, 2015, 12:24:41 pm
Vano Muradeli: Symphony No 2 in D major

I have been spending some time lately sorting through a lot of files I have downloaded over the last couple of years or so; some of them are a bit mysterious now. Either I can't tell where I got them, or sometimes, even what they are.

I have a zip file for the above mentioned symphony, which I thought must come from here, but I can't find the posting of it. I did a little research into the piece itself, the results of which I post here for the benfit of anyone interested. The zip contains five files, but the symphony has only four movements. Files two and three need to be merged. Then you have::

1: Adagio-Allegro fervido
2: Adagio sostenuto
3: Allegro moderato
4: Allegro vivo

Hope this is useful to someone.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on March 08, 2016, 06:01:08 pm
Malcolm Henbury-Ballan (MHBallan on here) has been kind enough to send me his DAT-format cassette on which this Lyrical Intermezzo was recorded, together with a number of other Bortkiewicz works (see below).  I have transferred them to MP3 format and put in the Downloads section. According to Malcolm all come from the archives of Austrian Radio and were recorded in the 1940s and 1950s.  I hope you enjoy.  Many thanks to Malcolm! Both Ukraine and Russia can claim Bortkiewicz, so I have put these recordings in the downloads sections for both countries!

Des Frühlings und des Pans Erwachen - ein lyrisches Intermezzo nach Gemälden von Sandro Botticelli, Op.44

Aus der Kinderzeit, Op.39 - arr. string orchestra

Im 3/4 Takt

Overture to a Fairytale Opera, Op.53

Elegie, Op.46 arr. cello & piano

Berceuse for violin & piano

Piano Concerto No.1 in B♭ major, Op.16

Piano Sonata No.2 in C♯ minor, Op.60

Etude No.6, Op.15


The arrangements are the composer's own.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: rkhenderson on January 11, 2017, 10:46:50 am
There is quite a lot of music by Veniamin Basner here for download that I have never seen before e.g.

Symphony No. 2 "Blockade"
Symphony "Ekaterina Ismailova" after themes from Shostakovich
Sinfonietta for Flute and Strings
Complete Ballet "The Three Musketeers"
Suites of Film Music "Fate of Man" and "The White Guard"

http://basner.narod.ru/muz.htm


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: pianoconcerto on January 11, 2017, 04:12:38 pm
"Malcolm Henbury-Ballan (MHBallan on here) has been kind enough to send me his DAT-format cassette on which this Lyrical Intermezzo was recorded, together with a number of other Bortkiewicz works (see below).  I have transferred them to MP3 format and put in the Downloads section. According to Malcolm all come from the archives of Austrian Radio and were recorded in the 1940s and 1950s.  I hope you enjoy.  Many thanks to Malcolm! Both Ukraine and Russia can claim Bortkiewicz, so I have put these recordings in the downloads sections for both countries!"

Please note that this recording of Bortkiewicz's Piano Concerto No. 1 is heavily cut in the last movement, which runs only 4:33 vs. Hyperion's complete recording of 12:14.  Apparently, performers used to take a lot of liberties with the score; there are different cuts marked by hand in the score on IMSLP and Marjorie Mitchell's recording has various omissions, too.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on September 17, 2017, 09:51:33 pm
Just wondered if anyone had ever downloaded (I didn't find it)  these works by the Karelian-Soviet composer G. Sinisalo:  Sampo- Ballet, Karelia Pictures and Heroes of the Forest Symphony?    were released on Melodiya but very rare.    Thanks !!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Toby Esterhase on September 18, 2017, 12:23:19 am
Just wondered if anyone had ever downloaded (I didn't find it)  these works by the Karelian-Soviet composer G. Sinisalo:  Sampo- Ballet, Karelia Pictures and Heroes of the Forest Symphony?    were released on Melodiya but very rare.    Thanks !!
Dear Mr Hibbard
Here samples:
http://gov.karelia.ru/gov/Different/Kalevala/music/ballet_e.shtml
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=midPaH5-Dq0
Melodiya's lp was a suite
Best


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: rkhenderson on November 26, 2017, 06:09:52 pm
Shchedrin Concerto lontano. Concerto for Piano and String Orchestra №6 (2003)

http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/89023


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: BrianA on December 20, 2017, 04:45:47 am
Robert Henderson, many thanks for Dialogue and Fugue by Slonimsky.  Anything by Slonimsky is always gratefully received by me!

Brian


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: BrianA on December 22, 2017, 06:19:22 am
Robert,

Is there any further information about the Shostakovich - Rozhdestvensky "symphonic fragment" that you uploaded?  Is this fragment related to the putative sixteenth symphony, or is it something else altogether?

Brian


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: britishcomposer on December 22, 2017, 12:24:26 pm
No, it's the 1945 fragment. You can find more information here:
https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.572138 (https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.572138)
https://www.naxos.com/mainsite/blurbs_reviews.asp?item_code=8.572138&catNum=572138&filetype=About%20this%20Recording&language=English# (https://www.naxos.com/mainsite/blurbs_reviews.asp?item_code=8.572138&catNum=572138&filetype=About%20this%20Recording&language=English#)


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: BrianA on December 23, 2017, 03:50:32 am
Thanks, BC!   ;D


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: christopher on July 15, 2018, 03:07:37 pm
My contacts in Krasnoyarsk have come up trumps and sent me the recording of Cesar Cui's opera "The Prisoner of the Caucasus" which was performed there last year. It turns out the Russian Culture Ministry streamed it on a now obscure site ok.ru (kind of Russia's equivalent of myspace.com). 

It's advertised as in two acts - acc to wikipedia the first edition was in two acts, later revised to three.  The version here has been edited by someone called Vladimir Rylov.  The conductor is Alexandr Kosinsky with the Krasnoyarsk Opera and Balet Theatre, other performers aren't named. It was recorded/performed in 2017.

I've posted it in the downloads section.

From Wikipedia:

Prisoner of the Caucasus (Кавказский пленник in Cyrillic, Kavkazskij plennik in transliteration) is an opera in three acts, composed by César Cui. The libretto is credited to Viktor Krylov, and is based on Alexander Pushkin's poem The Prisoner of the Caucasus.

The English title has been rendered also as Prisoner in the Caucasus and The Captive in the Caucasus.

The opera was preceded on the Russian stage by choreographer Charles Didelot's ballet of 1825.

Composition
The opera was composed in three versions. The first, in 1857-1858, consisted of only two acts (which later became Acts I and III), but its staging was cancelled due to poor orchestration and insufficient length. Meanwhile the overture, orchestrated by Mily Balakirev, could be heard in concerts. Many years later, Cui decided to revise the two-act work: during 1881-1882 he added a new middle act (Act II) and another dance to Act III. This version constituted the score for the Russian premiere. In 1885, with the prospect of a Belgian production, he expanded the finale of Act II, creating the third version of the opera.

Performance history
Prisoner of the Caucasus was premiered on 4 February 1883 (Old Style), at the Mariinsky Theatre in Saint Petersburg under the conductorship of Eduard Nápravník. This opera became the most widely performed of the composer's full-length operas. Its production in Liège in 1886 — made possible in no small way by the enthusiastic support of Cui's friend, La Comtesse de Mercy-Argenteau — marked the first time that an opera by "The Mighty Handful" was performed in the West. Nevertheless, with this exception, the opera seems to have never been staged outside of Imperial Russia and to have fallen out of the repertory in Russia after the composer's death.

Roles
Kazenbek - bass
Fatima, his daughter - soprano 
Mar'iam, her friend - mezzo-soprano   
Abubeker, Fatima's bridegroom - baritoneI.
Fekherdin, a mullah - bass
A Russian prisoner - tenor
1st Circassian - tenor
2nd Circassian – baritone
2nd mullah - tenor

Synopsis

Place:Caucasus, in a mountain aoul

Act I. After the men of the aoul pray to Allah, Kazenbek tells his melancholy daughter, Fatima, that a bridegroom has been chosen for her. She meditates on her sorrow. Suddenly a crowd of highlanders arrive, bringing along a Russian Prisoner that Fatima's bridegroom has captured as a wedding gift. Fatima begins to sympathize and eventually to fall in love with the Prisoner.

The Prisoner is left alone until night, when Fatima secretly brings him some food. After they part, a highlander runs in to tell Kazenbek of a group of Russians raiding a nearby aoul. The people come out to join in the combat against the despised enemy.

Act II. A group of women congratulates Fatima on her impending nuptials. After they leave, Fatima reveals her sadness to her friend Mar'iam. Hearing the approaching steps of Kazenbek and Fekherdin, the two of them hide behind a curtain while overhearing the conversation. The mullah has had a dream revealing Fatima's love for the Russian Prisoner. The two men exit.

Then the bridegroom, Abubeker, arrives. He expresses his love for Fatima. She greets him, and gifts from the groom are presented. Abubeker gives the Prisoner to Kazenbek, who hates the Russian. The people condemn the Prisoner to death, which he welcomes to end his suffering.

Act III. At the wedding feast, the people praise the bridegroom. The women, then the men, perform dances. After Mar'iam sings a Circassian song, all exit except for the newlyweds. Fatima is still sad, and Abubeker asks the reason. When they exit, the shackled Prisoner enters. Then Fatima appears; she urges the Prisoner to escape and frees him. He tells her that he loves not her, but another in his homeland. She is devastated as he runs away.

Mar'iam appears and tells Fatima that the entire village is preparing to take revenge on the Russian. The people arrive and are horrified at the news of Fatima's actions. As they set out to kill her, Fatima stabs herself to death. [Note: According to the score, this is the method of Fatima's demise in the opera, not drowning, which is implied in Pushkin's original poem.]


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: dhibbard on July 15, 2018, 04:49:00 pm
Thanks !!


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Hattoff on July 16, 2018, 08:06:14 am
That's brilliant. Many Thanks.


Title: Re: Russian and Soviet Music
Post by: Dundonnell on July 16, 2018, 06:47:40 pm
As an administrator of this forum I would like to commend members who take the time to thank others for their contributions in this way

I sometimes forget to do this myself but I also know how gratifying it is to know that others appreciate a post or an upload