The Art-Music Forum

Little-known music of all eras => Downloads discussion => Topic started by: mjkFendrich on May 31, 2013, 06:12:53 pm



Title: Ukrainian Music
Post by: mjkFendrich on May 31, 2013, 06:12:53 pm
@dhibbard:

Thanks for the Maiboroda symphonies - a recording of his violin concerto (1977) would be welcome too!


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 01, 2013, 10:39:02 pm
ahhh.. changed plans... thought I would get some of the more important Ukrainian Soviet composers up on the download section.
there is really great symphonic works out there by Shtogarenko, Kolessa, Dankevich, Dominchen, Gubarenko, Kos Anatolsky, Lyatoshinksy (on Russian CD),   Lyudkevich,  Maiboroda, Nakhabin, Revutsky, Shamo,  Stankovich (on CD now naxos).

Dave


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: fr8nks on June 02, 2013, 03:35:20 am
I think I am speaking for all of us when I say we are definitely enjoying this. Christmas came early this year. Many thanks for all your uploads.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 02, 2013, 05:06:07 am
Sure.... its no fun having all of the music and no one listening to it... I've enjoyed it and as you can see I collect rare LPs and rare Soviet composers on Melodiya.   Thanks for the note !!


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Gauk on June 02, 2013, 08:11:21 am
I think I am speaking for all of us when I say we are definitely enjoying this. Christmas came early this year. Many thanks for all your uploads.

Same here! A treat to be sure. Remarkable that so much wonderful music is unknown.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 07, 2013, 04:28:41 am
Does anyone have Lyudkevich's Moisei - sym poem?



Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on June 15, 2013, 03:29:55 am
I think I am speaking for all of us when I say we are definitely enjoying this. Christmas came early this year. Many thanks for all your uploads.
[/quote

I second this - Dave thank you so much for all this Ukrainian music, I am really looking forward to working my way through it!  I'm sorry for my silence - I have been moving house these past few weeks, exhausting! So therefore a nice surprise to log back on after a long gap and find a wealth of new (to me) music.  And Dave, forgive the direct question, but I was wondering if it was on your list to upload the (Belarusian) Zolotarev LPs which you mentioned?  I just find myself really curious about this composer!
 I have got 3 classical music specialist shops in London searching for them on my behalf, but no luck so far!


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 23, 2013, 06:31:11 am
Andrei Shtoharenko

Symphony No. 3 "Memory of a Friend" for String Orchestra (1966)
I. Allegro moderato II. Andante doloroso III. Allegro con brio
Kiev Chamber Orchestra, A. Sharoev


http://www.mediafire.com/download/4xqog80s7282tee/ShtoharenkoS3.m4a

this is listed as Sym No 2 in D major for String Orchestra Kiev Chamber Orchestra  Sharoyev, conductor
in the Bennett guide.

Dave

sent from my can't-tell-you


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: rkhenderson on June 23, 2013, 09:01:28 am
Holger explained this to me as follows

'His Symphony No. 1 is "My Ukraine", but when he composed it he first called it "Symphony-Cantata" only. He even received a Stalin prize for this piece as I remember. However, for years, he did not count it as part of his official symphonic cycle.

Some years later, he composed an orchestral work in four movements which he called "Symphonic Tales". It was recorded on a Melodiya LP. However, it seems that at the end of the 1950s or so, he suddenly decided to call this piece "Symphony No. 1".

The String Symphony which came afterwards was then No. 2, the Kiev Symphony from 1972 No. 3 and so on.

However, as he got older, he finally decided to include "My Ukraine" in his cycle of numbered symphonies and counted it as No. 1 according to the chronology. Therefore, the number of all his other symphonies increased by 1.

Clearly, all this lead to an enormous chaos. So in fact, all his symphonies but No. 5 have been recorded on Melodiya LPs, but "My Ukraine" still doesn't have a number on the LP, the Kiev one is called No. 3 and the strings one No. 2. Moreover, the final No. 2 (the Fairy Tales Symphony) isn't even labled "symphony" on the Melodiya it was recorded on!'

No. 1 - My Ukraine
No. 2 - Fairy Tales (formerly "Symphony Tales" only)
No. 3 - To the Memory of a Friend, for Strings
No. 4 - Kiev
No. 5 - Komsomol
No. 6 - Biographical


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 23, 2013, 04:41:35 pm
Does anyone have Kos-Anatolsky's Wing of Jay- ballet suite? 

I'm still in Tallin and hope to cross over to St. Petersburg and go to the offices of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic SO.   
One of my friends there said at one time they had fresh recordings of the Zolotarev symphonies cycle, prob. recorded in 2002.

Dave


sent from my can't-tell-you


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 28, 2013, 02:42:31 am
Does anyone have Kos-Anatolsky's Wing of Jay- ballet suite? 

I'm still in Tallin and hope to cross over to St. Petersburg and go to the offices of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic SO.   
One of my friends there said at one time they had fresh recordings of the Zolotarev symphonies cycle, prob. recorded in 2002.

Dave


sent from my can't-tell-you

darn... no such luck...they only produced less than a hundred of that series....

sent from my can't-tell-you   


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on June 28, 2013, 04:44:49 pm
Does anyone have Kos-Anatolsky's Wing of Jay- ballet suite? 

I'm still in Tallin and hope to cross over to St. Petersburg and go to the offices of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic SO.   
One of my friends there said at one time they had fresh recordings of the Zolotarev symphonies cycle, prob. recorded in 2002.

Dave


sent from my can't-tell-you

darn... no such luck...they only produced less than a hundred of that series....

sent from my can't-tell-you   

Oh what a shame!  Did you get any details in terms of conductor name, orchestra name, catalogue number? I can search in Russian if so, as well as ask around my musical contacts in Moscow...


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 28, 2013, 08:01:02 pm
Does anyone have Kos-Anatolsky's Wing of Jay- ballet suite? 

I'm still in Tallin and hope to cross over to St. Petersburg and go to the offices of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic SO.   
One of my friends there said at one time they had fresh recordings of the Zolotarev symphonies cycle, prob. recorded in 2002.

Dave


sent from my can't-tell-you

darn... no such luck...they only produced less than a hundred of that series....

sent from my can't-tell-you   

Oh what a shame!  Did you get any details in terms of conductor name, orchestra name, catalogue number? I can search in Russian if so, as well as ask around my musical contacts in Moscow...


No.. sorry Chris... didn't think about that when I was there.   Its possible that someone in St. Petersburg might put them on ebay in the future?  idk.
I talked with the owner of Toccata Records btw and he indicated that the Zolotarev symphonies were also on his hit list.

Dave

sent from my can't-tell-you


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 28, 2013, 08:03:36 pm
Does anyone have Kos-Anatolsky's Wing of Jay- ballet suite? 

I'm still in Tallin and hope to cross over to St. Petersburg and go to the offices of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic SO.   
One of my friends there said at one time they had fresh recordings of the Zolotarev symphonies cycle, prob. recorded in 2002.

Dave


sent from my can't-tell-you

darn... no such luck...they only produced less than a hundred of that series....

sent from my can't-tell-you   

Oh what a shame!  Did you get any details in terms of conductor name, orchestra name, catalogue number? I can search in Russian if so, as well as ask around my musical contacts in Moscow...


No.. sorry Chris... didn't think about that when I was there.   Its possible that someone in St. Petersburg might put them on ebay in the future?  idk.
I talked with the owner of Toccata Records btw and he indicated that the Zolotarev symphonies were also on his hit list.

Dave

sent from my can't-tell-you

forgot to mention that the scores are all in the Jāzeps Vītols Latvian Academy of Music in Riga... I saw them there.

Dave

sent from my can't-tell-you 


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on July 01, 2013, 07:45:47 pm
Does anyone have Kos-Anatolsky's Wing of Jay- ballet suite? 

I'm still in Tallin and hope to cross over to St. Petersburg and go to the offices of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic SO.   
One of my friends there said at one time they had fresh recordings of the Zolotarev symphonies cycle, prob. recorded in 2002.

Dave


sent from my can't-tell-you

darn... no such luck...they only produced less than a hundred of that series....

sent from my can't-tell-you   

Oh what a shame!  Did you get any details in terms of conductor name, orchestra name, catalogue number? I can search in Russian if so, as well as ask around my musical contacts in Moscow...


No.. sorry Chris... didn't think about that when I was there.   Its possible that someone in St. Petersburg might put them on ebay in the future?  idk.
I talked with the owner of Toccata Records btw and he indicated that the Zolotarev symphonies were also on his hit list.

Dave

sent from my can't-tell-you


They're all on his hitlist with a view to re-releasing them under the Toccata label, or as private interest?


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: theqbar on August 20, 2013, 11:16:01 am
A. Shtogarenko
In Memory of the Ukrainian Forests (in five movements)


I think that the name of this suite is "In memory of Lesya Ukrainka". Lesya Ukrainka is the pseudonym of a poet from Ukraine, though if you translate literally her name it can mean "Ukrainian Forests"   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesya_Ukrainka


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on August 24, 2013, 02:50:20 pm
A. Shtogarenko
In Memory of the Ukrainian Forests (in five movements)


I think that the name of this suite is "In memory of Lesya Ukrainka". Lesya Ukrainka is the pseudonym of a poet from Ukraine, though if you translate literally her name it can mean "Ukrainian Forests"   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesya_Ukrainka


Is there a link to a download of this?


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Dundonnell on August 24, 2013, 03:04:22 pm
A. Shtogarenko
In Memory of the Ukrainian Forests (in five movements)


I think that the name of this suite is "In memory of Lesya Ukrainka". Lesya Ukrainka is the pseudonym of a poet from Ukraine, though if you translate literally her name it can mean "Ukrainian Forests"   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesya_Ukrainka


Is there a link to a download of this?

Yes....on Page 2 of the download thread.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on September 03, 2013, 11:46:49 pm
wow !!!   60 downloads so far on the Dominchen Sym No 1....!!  so far that is the most downloaded
Enjoy

Dave


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: ttle on December 14, 2013, 09:49:31 am
VLADIMIR ZOLOTUKHIN  (1936-1996, UKRAINE)
 
 Concert Overture
  Symphony No. 1 (1970)

     

    http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?gkp8zbimgzoez0i

   Vadim Gnedash (cond),  Ukrainian Radio Television Symphony Orchestra

   
  Soure: MELODIYA SM 03943-4 (LP) (1973)

Zolotukhin seems to have survived his distinction as People's Artist of Ukraine (1996) ;D He actually lived until 2010.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: kyjo on December 14, 2013, 11:05:10 pm
Ukrainian music is tragically unsung and should be promoted much more, there is a treasure trove to sample here:
http://classical-music-online.net/stat/?person_type=composer&type=country_persons&country=UKR
For one of the most aggregiously unsungs, try the fascinating cycle of symphonies by Levko Kolodub (B.1930), his french horn concerto is an unforgettable statement!
http://classical-music-online.net/en/composer/Kolodub/8079

Roger, have you heard any of Andrei Shtogarenko's (or Shtoharenko) music? He's composed some wonderful, tonal music in a lyrical/dramatic style rather akin to his fellow Ukrainian Lyatoshinsky (I assume you know his music). Lots of it is on YouTube.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Elroel on July 15, 2014, 02:32:43 pm
A moment ago I posted three concerti by:

Alëna Tomljonova (b 1981) is an Ukraine composer. You will also find her with Aliona as first name. This is how her name is pronounced.
The works are all taken from an all Tomlionova concert evening, broadcasted two years later (2007). For your  convenience I placed the concertos individually.
Miss Tomljonova had her 5th Symphony premiered this year.

Chamber Orchestra of the Odessa Philharmonic
Conductor Igor Shavryk
The soloists are unknown.
The concierto took place in the aula of the Museum for Literature in Odessa (2205).


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Holger on July 16, 2014, 07:42:38 pm
Thanks for all the links, Roelof. One little correction has to be made: Tomlionova is much older, she wasn't born in 1981 but in 1963. The conductor of the Fifth Symphony must also be Igor Shavruk. I checked the YouTube video of the symphony (which really shows orchestra and conductor in action) and compared it to pictures of Shavruk: that's him.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Elroel on July 16, 2014, 11:24:37 pm
Thanks, Holger


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: cjvinthechair on July 18, 2014, 04:48:23 pm
A moment ago I posted three concerti by:

Alëna Tomljonova (b 1981) is an Ukraine composer. You will also find her with Aliona as first name. This is how her name is pronounced.
The works are all taken from an all Tomlionova concert evening, broadcasted two years later (2007). For your  convenience I placed the concertos individually.
Miss Tomljonova had her 5th Symphony premiered this year.

Chamber Orchestra of the Odessa Philharmonic
Conductor Igor Shavryk
The soloists are unknown.
The concierto took place in the aula of the Museum for Literature in Odessa (2205).

Thank you , Mr. E. Another new name !


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 08, 2016, 06:01:48 pm
Malcolm Henbury-Ballan (MHBallan on here) has been kind enough to send me his DAT-format cassette on which this Lyrical Intermezzo was recorded, together with a number of other Bortkiewicz works (see below).  I have transferred them to MP3 format and put in the Downloads section. According to Malcolm all come from the archives of Austrian Radio and were recorded in the 1940s and 1950s.  I hope you enjoy.  Many thanks to Malcolm! Both Ukraine and Russia can claim Bortkiewicz, so I have put these recordings in the downloads sections for both countries!

Des Frühlings und des Pans Erwachen - ein lyrisches Intermezzo nach Gemälden von Sandro Botticelli, Op.44

Aus der Kinderzeit, Op.39 - arr. string orchestra

Im 3/4 Takt

Overture to a Fairytale Opera, Op.53

Elegie, Op.46 arr. cello & piano

Berceuse for violin & piano

Piano Concerto No.1 in B♭ major, Op.16

Piano Sonata No.2 in C♯ minor, Op.60

Etude No.6, Op.15


The arrangements are the composer's own.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Carpaccio.Espagnol on March 11, 2016, 06:43:46 pm
Hello everyone.  I am new to the forum (and just discovered it today).

I started a YouTube channel featuring works of composers from Ukraine which were not already on YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzGcjCdjL7Xaj8MoaAQi3IA
There are works by Yarovinsky (Symphony #2), Znosko-Borovsky (violin concerto and chamber works), Podvala (violin concerto and piano quartet), Filippenko (chamber works) and many others.  In addition, there are seemingly new works of significance posted every week on other channels, and I add them to the "Liked" section.  For example Simovych symphonies 4,5,7 have been added in last two weeks.

I have been uploading works from my own collection and others found online in the deep pockets of the Internet.  I am pleased to find new materials in this forum and thank everyone for their contribution.  I also have sheet music and access to a variety of sheet music through a local library which hosts a huge variety of Ukrainian works.  

Regards,
Stefan



Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on March 12, 2016, 04:55:50 am
Hello everyone.  I am new to the forum (and just discovered it today).

I started a YouTube channel featuring works of composers from Ukraine which were not already on YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzGcjCdjL7Xaj8MoaAQi3IA
There are works by Yarovinsky (Symphony #2), Znosko-Borovsky (violin concerto and chamber works), Podvala (violin concerto and piano quartet), Filippenko (chamber works) and many others.  In addition, there are seemingly new works of significance posted every week on other channels, and I add them to the "Liked" section.  For example Simovych symphonies 4,5,7 have been added in last two weeks.

I have been uploading works from my own collection and others found online in the deep pockets of the Internet.  I am pleased to find new materials in this forum and thank everyone for their contribution.  I also have sheet music and access to a variety of sheet music through a local library which hosts a huge variety of Ukrainian works.  

Regards,
Stefan



Welcome to the group !!!


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 12, 2016, 05:31:18 pm
I've posted up a complete recording of Viktor Kosenko's piano concerto, which he wrote in 1928.  A recording of the first movement of this piece was posted up here a few years ago I think (with Arthur Nikulin, and the Academic Symphonic Orchestra of Lviv Philharmonic Society under Dmytro Logvin) and quite a few people liked it as I recall, possibly as it's very Rachmaninovian. 

I have also posted up a concert recording of Kosenko's Dawn Poem (orchestrated by Levko Kolodub, a twentieth century Ukrainian composer).


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 13, 2016, 11:31:14 pm
I've posted up a recording of Mykola Lysenko's "Meni Odnakovo", a musical setting for tenor and orchestra of the poem of the same name, which means "It makes no difference to me", by Ukraine's greatest poet Taras Shevchenko.

It is a real cry from the heart, a howl of anguish and rage, at the state of his homeland Ukraine.  The sentiments expressed would not have been liked at all by the tsarist or communist regimes (and not by the current regime in the Kremlin one suspects). And in this performance the great Ivan Koslovsky, himself Ukrainian, gives it his all. It is beautiful and devastating.


It Makes No Difference To Me

It makes no difference to me,
If I shall live or not in Ukraine
Or whether any one shall think
Of me 'mid foreign snow and rain.
It makes no difference to me.

In slavery I grew 'mid strangers,
Unwept by any kin of mine;
In slavery I now will die
And vanish without any sign.
I shall not leave the slightest trace
Upon our glorious Ukraine,
Our land, but not as ours known.
No father will remind his son
Or say to him, "Repeat one prayer,
One prayer for him; for our Ukraine
They tortured him in their foul lair."

It makes no difference to me,
If that son says a prayer or not.
It makes great difference to me
That evil folk and wicked men
Attack our Ukraine, once so free,
And rob and plunder it at will.
That makes great difference to me.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 17, 2016, 08:50:10 pm
Thank you so much to Stefan (Carpaccio.Espagnol) for his youtube channel of Ukrainian music.  I particularly liked the recording by violinist Abram Shtern of the Adagio of Mavka and Lukash from Song of the Forest ballet by Mykhailo Skorulskyi (1887-1950). So I have converted it to mp3; and I also did some digging around and found some more youtube clips, all recordings of live performances of the ballets. I have also converted these to mp3 and put in the downloads section.  Lovely harmonious atmospheric music, with hints of Khachaturian (who was actually 17 years younger).


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 17, 2016, 09:12:10 pm
I've come across another Ukrainian composer on youtube whose piano concerto has Rachmaninovian movements, and is melodic, harmonious and late-romantic throughout. All the more surprising therefore when I found that his dates were 1926-1988 which lies well outside the date range of composers whose music I like.  His name is Yury Znatokov, from Odessa.  I have posted up his Piano Concerto No.1, Violin Concerto No.1 (in memory of Aram Khachaturian), and fragments from his ballets "The Triumph of Love" and "The Princess Volkonskaya".


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Toby Esterhase on March 18, 2016, 12:21:02 am
I've come across another Ukrainian composer on youtube whose piano concerto has Rachmaninovian movements, and is melodic, harmonious and late-romantic throughout. All the more surprising therefore when I found that his dates were 1926-1988 which lies well outside the date range of composers whose music I like.  His name is Yury Znatokov, from Odessa.  I have posted up his Piano Concerto No.1, Violin Concerto No.1 (in memory of Aram Khachaturian), and fragments from his ballets "The Triumph of Love" and "The Princess Volkonskaya".

Dear Christopher
You can contact conductor Znatokov Jr. here:
https://www.facebook.com/znatokov?fref=ts
Best


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: gpdlt2000 on March 19, 2016, 03:23:08 pm
Thank you so much to Stefan (Carpaccio.Espagnol) for his youtube channel of Ukrainian music.  I particularly liked the recording by violinist Abram Shtern of the Adagio of Mavka and Lukash from Song of the Forest ballet by Mykhailo Skorulskyi (1887-1950). So I have converted it to mp3; and I also did some digging around and found some more youtube clips, all recordings of live performances of the ballets. I have also converted these to mp3 and put in the downloads section.  Lovely harmonious atmospheric music, with hints of Khachaturian (who was actually 17 years younger).

Could you please indicate the right order for the complete Song of the Forests ballet?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks in advance!


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 19, 2016, 05:55:45 pm
Thank you so much to Stefan (Carpaccio.Espagnol) for his youtube channel of Ukrainian music.  I particularly liked the recording by violinist Abram Shtern of the Adagio of Mavka and Lukash from Song of the Forest ballet by Mykhailo Skorulskyi (1887-1950). So I have converted it to mp3; and I also did some digging around and found some more youtube clips, all recordings of live performances of the ballets. I have also converted these to mp3 and put in the downloads section.  Lovely harmonious atmospheric music, with hints of Khachaturian (who was actually 17 years younger).

Could you please indicate the right order for the complete Song of the Forests ballet?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks in advance!
 

It's a collection of clips taken from youtube, I don't know the order I'm afraid.  Do you enjoy the music?


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: gpdlt2000 on March 21, 2016, 02:38:47 pm
@Christopher

This is beautiful music indeed. Somehow, it reminded me of Gličre's ballet music.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 21, 2016, 09:42:38 pm
@Christopher

This is beautiful music indeed. Somehow, it reminded me of Gličre's ballet music.

It is beautiful isn't it.... I keep listening to it over and over.  Which Gliere music in particular does it remind you of? I would love to listen/   Of course, Gliere was a fellow Ukrainian.


There is actually a full(-ish) Melodiya-label recording om LP from 1971, with Boris Chistiakov conducting the Orchestra of the Kyiv Opera and Balet Theatre.  (Melodiya-D-029901—2)

If anyone has it, please do post up!  (If you are in London, I can do an LP to CD/mp3 transfer for you!)

The record cover looks like this:


(https://cdn.discogs.com/vmWog2K8uE-SEh-ddFc9_wwZm10=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb()/discogs-images/R-3462668-1331338660.jpeg.jpg)


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: gpdlt2000 on March 22, 2016, 01:39:02 pm
It does remind me of Gličre's ballet music, specifically The red poppy and The bronze horseman - at least in some numbers.
Thanks for your offering, but I'm afraid I am rather far from London (South America, as a matter of fact).


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 22, 2016, 07:21:40 pm
It does remind me of Gličre's ballet music, specifically The red poppy and The bronze horseman - at least in some numbers.
Thanks for your offering, but I'm afraid I am rather far from London (South America, as a matter of fact).



So you have this LP?


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Corentin Boissier on April 04, 2016, 01:42:58 pm
Hello everyone !
WARNING : The audio file of Vitaly Gubarenko's "Symphony No. 1" (posted on 1st June 2013) contains four times the last movement of this symphony "Allegro vivo" (8 minutes 25 seconds x 4) !!!
So the first three movements (1 Moderato ; 2 Allegretto ; 3 Andante) are missing !

Corentin Boissier (collectionCB, collectionCB2, collectionCB3 & collectionCB4)


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on April 04, 2016, 03:51:18 pm
I'll check that... I still have the recording on cassette tape from the original LP. 


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on April 05, 2016, 04:01:59 am
actually there are 4 movements.. Moderato; Allegretto; Andante;  and Allegro vivo

The conductor is Igor Blazhkov with the Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra..


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Corentin Boissier on April 05, 2016, 09:09:30 pm
actually there are 4 movements.. Moderato; Allegretto; Andante;  and Allegro vivo

The conductor is Igor Blazhkov with the Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra..
Yes, of course I know that this symphony is in four movements, and I know their titles, as well as the conductor and the orchestra !!! I just said that your audio file (which lasts 33:35) contains four times the 4th movement (8:24).
So please re-upload the symphony, with its four movements (total duration : 32 minutes).
Musically,
Corentin Boissier


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on April 08, 2016, 04:27:04 pm
Ok I see what I did.. forgot to flip the cassette while transferring to mediafire..    I'll redo it soon.

Thanks
Dave


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: Corentin Boissier on April 20, 2016, 05:18:53 pm
Ok I see what I did.. forgot to flip the cassette while transferring to mediafire..    I'll redo it soon.


I hope you'll soon re-upload this symphony with its four different movements :-)


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 08, 2017, 12:04:09 am
Skorulskyi, Mykhaylo Adamovych (1887-1950)

Adagio of Mavka and Lukash, from the ballet Song of the Forest

Orchestra of Donetsk National Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet named after A.B. Solovyanenko
(violin solo and conductor unknown)

I've posted up fragments from this ballet before (above).  This particular recording of its "climax" piece is "ripped" from a complete live performance by the Donetsk ballet which is posted up on youtube ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cT1hGNBnHdg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cT1hGNBnHdg)).

The Adagio is about 7 minutes long and is for violin and orchestra.  To me this version is a true encore piece, and hits the spot more than any of the several other versions out there, including the one released commercially with Abram Shtern on the violin and the Kyiv Opera Theatre Orchestra under Borys Chystyakov. I am embarrassed to say I have often had it on repeat for up to an hour at a time! I hope you like it as much as I do.




Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 30, 2018, 09:11:50 pm
Ryabov, Olexiy Panteleymonovych   (1899-1955)

I have just uploaded a recording of excerpts from his operetta Wedding in Malinovka.

Biographical info (from wikipedia and other sources, via google translate:

Alexei Panteleimonovich Ryabov (* 5 (17) March 1899, Kharkiv - † December 18, 1955, Kyiv) - Ukrainian composer, violinist and conductor, Honored Artist of the Ukrainian SSR (1951).
Life
Born on March 5 (March 17) in 1899 in Kharkiv. In 1918 he graduated from the Kharkiv Conservatory. From 1919 he worked as a violinist, concertmaster and conductor in various cities of the USSR.
In 1929-1941 he was the conductor of the First State Ukrainian Musical Comedy. Production: "Tsygan-Baron", "Zaporozhets the Danube", "Metis", "Natalka-Poltavka", "Oksana", "Three-fourth person", "Dry law", Specially for the Kharkov theater of musical comedy wrote music for the plays: "Friendly Hill", "Three Fourth Man", "Dry Law", "Sorochinsky Fair", "Wedding in Malinovka", "May Night", "Kolombina".
From 1941 - the conductor of the Kyiv Musical Comedy Theater, whose house on the Great Vasilkivska Street, 53, has a memorial plaque.
He died on December 18, 1955. Buried in Kiev at Baykovoye Cemetery.
Writings
He is the author of more than 20 operettas and musical comedies. Among others:
• "Screen Stars",
• "May Night",
• "Sorochinskaya Fair" (1936),
• "Dash the Dnipro",
• "Wonderland" (1950),
• "Chervona kalina" (1954),
• The most popular is «Wedding in Malinovka» (1938).
In addition, concert for violin and orchestra, symphony, string quartet.

Alexey Panteleymonovich Ryabov (1899-1955) is a Soviet and Ukrainian violinist, composer and conductor. Honored Art Worker of the Ukrainian SSR (1951).
Among his works there are more than 20 operettas; symphonic and chamber works; theatrical music. Some of his works were released on record.
Biography
He was born on March 5 (March 17 in a new style) in 1899 in Kharkov.
Early leaving without parents, being an orphan, graduated from school and continued studying music. In 1918 he graduated from the Kharkov Conservatory, where he was simultaneously engaged in violin and composition classes. After graduating from the conservatory, he worked as a concertmaster of the symphony orchestra in Kharkov. Since 1919 he worked as a violinist-accompanist and conductor in other cities of the USSR.
In 1929-1941, AP Ryabov - conductor of the First State Ukrainian Musical Comedy. Since 1941 - the conductor of the Kiev theater of musical comedy (in 1950-1955 - the art director).
He died on December 18, 1955 in Kiev. He was buried in the Baikovo cemetery.
Ukrainian poet Maxim Rylsky called Ryabov "the creator of music, in which the sunny soul and the irresistible power of the Ukrainians are revealed."
Memory
• On the building of the Kiev Theater of Musical Comedy (Bolshaya Vasilkovskaya Street, 53) September 21, 2007 Alexei Ryabov was installed memorial plaque.

"Wedding in Malinovka" - an operetta based on the same name of the libretto by Leonid Yukhvid and Mikhail Avach was first staged in the city of Kharkiv in the First State Ukrainian Musical Comedy in 1937. Her author was the main conductor of the theater composer Alexei Ryabov, whose creative work has more than 20 operettas and musical comedies.
Almost simultaneously, in 1937-1938, a Russian-language version of the composer Boris Oleksandrov appeared on the basis of the libretto by Leonid Yukhvid and Victor Lipot.
In 1967, at the film studio Lenfilm directed by Andrei Tutyshkin, the Russian version of the operetta was filmed.
Among the leaders of the Soviet-era hire (1940-1989), the comedy "The Wedding in Malinovka" occupies the honorable 5th place - 74.6 million spectators.



Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 30, 2018, 09:12:48 pm
Ryabov, Olexiy Panteleymonovych   (1899-1955)

Wedding in Malinovka - continued

Plot

The Ukrainian village of Malinovka spread freely in the steppe. In the greenery of the gardens are drowned white mud huts. But everything seemed to die out around, do not rustle over Malinovka in the evenings fervent girlish songs. There is a severe 1919 year. A lot of troubles had to be experienced by the villagers. And then there's the new attack - in the district there was a gang of Gritsko - the son of the local rich Balyasnoy, who appropriated a magnificent title - pan-ataman Gritsian Tavrichesky. However, no matter how much Gritsko did, his affairs were bad - a bandit gang was falling apart before his eyes. Feeling that he did not stay long ataman, Gritsko decides to the last villainy - he plans to forcibly take in his wives the beauty that attracted him Yarinka.
And Yarinka does not know anything about the impending disaster. She is happy in her soul, because she has long loved the young shepherd Andreika.
One morning, lifting up the pungent dust clouds, Gritsian's mounted gang appeared on a rural street. Next to the ataman is his rightful adjutant, Popandopulo. Looking at him, it's hard to keep from laughing. He wears a riding breeches of green billiard cloth, a cap with a pancake, and all of his small frail figure is hung with weapons. "Hey, Yarinka," Gritsian stops the girl, "prepare for the wedding!" Today at eight o'clock we'll be married. " In despair, Yarinka rushed out of the village. The only hope is the detachment of the Red Army, who, according to rumors, stopped somewhere in the woods beyond the yar.
Yarinka tracked down the Red Army men. With participation listened to the excited story of the girl commander of the detachment Nazar Dumas, a native of these places, who lost his family in the burnt village. The difficult task is facing Nazar, because he has only thirty fighters, and Gritsian in the gang has one hundred and fifty! And then he decides to go for the trick. The Duma advises Yarinka for visibility to agree to a wedding. The commander's plan is simple: when bandits get drunk, the detachment suddenly attacks them and smashes the whole gang. To prepare this operation, Nazar the Duma under the guise of a soldier returning from captivity, makes his way to Malinovka, where preparations are being made for the ataman wedding.
However, the planned plan is in jeopardy. At first, Nazar unexpectedly meets his long-lost wife, who almost reveals his incognito. Then the commander learns that, according to Gritsian's order, the wedding was decided to be played two hours before the deadline. Report about this the Red Army soldiers are taking Andreyka. Warned them fighters are at the wedding in Malinovka on time!
Gladly welcome the residents of their liberators. But the Red Cavalrymen are in a hurry - time does not wait. After a short rest, the detachment marches on a campaign. Next to the commander is the newly-arrived daughter Yarinka and happy Andreyka. A red banner rattles in the wind, the famous song of the First Cavalier flies loudly over Malinovka.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 30, 2018, 09:17:15 pm
Ryabov, Olexiy Panteleymonovych   (1899-1955)

More biographical info (using google translate):

http://www.belcanto.ru/ryabov_alexei.html (http://www.belcanto.ru/ryabov_alexei.html)

Ryabov was a Soviet composer, one of the oldest authors of the Soviet operetta.
Alexey Panteleymonovich Ryabov was born on March 5 (17), 1899 in Kharkiv, Ukraine. He received his musical education at the Kharkiv Conservatory, where he was simultaneously engaged in violin and composition classes. After graduating from the conservatory in 1918, he taught violin, worked as a concertmaster of the symphony orchestra in Kharkiv and other cities. In the early years he created the Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (1919), a number of chamber instrumental and vocal compositions.

1923 turned out to be a turning point in Ryabov's creative destiny: he wrote the operetta "Colombina", which premiered in Rostov-on-Don. Since then, the composer firmly linked his work with the operetta. In 1929 in Kharkov, in place of the Russian operetta company that existed for many years, the first operetta theater in Ukrainian was formed. In the repertoire of the theater along with Western operettas were Ukrainian musical comedies. For many years Ryabov was his conductor, and in 1941 he became the chief conductor of the Kiev Musical Comedy Theater, where he worked until the end of his days.

Creative legacy of Ryabov has more than twenty operettas and musical comedies. Among them - "Sorochinskaya Fair" (1936) and "May Night" (1937) on the stories of Gogol's novels from the book "Evenings on a Farm near Dikanka". Widely known in Ukraine was his operetta on L. Yukhvid's libretto "The Wedding in Malinovka" (outside the republic, the operetta of B. Aleksandrov was distributed to the same plot). Not being endowed with a bright compositional personality, AP Ryabov possessed undoubted professionalism, knew the laws of the genre well. His operettas were staged all over the Soviet Union.

"Sorochinskaya Fair" was a repertoire of many Soviet theaters. In 1975, it was placed in the GDR (Berlin, "Metropol-Theater").




Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on December 11, 2018, 08:20:03 pm
I have just uploaded the first movement of the 1st piano concerto of Volodymyr Pukhalsky (1848-1933).

A couple of online bios list him as Belarusian or Polish or Russian as well as Ukrainian.

A few bios:

http://www.encyclopediaofukraine.com/display.asp?linkpath=pages%5CP%5CU%5CPukhalskyVolodymyr.htm (http://www.encyclopediaofukraine.com/display.asp?linkpath=pages%5CP%5CU%5CPukhalskyVolodymyr.htm)

Pukhalsky, Volodymyr [Пухальський, Володимир; Puxal’s’kyj], b 2 April 1848 in Minsk, d 23 February 1933 in Kyiv. Teacher, pianist, and composer. In 1874 he graduated from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, and in 1876 he was appointed director of the Russian Music Society’s school in Kyiv. From 1913 he was a professor of piano at the Kyiv Conservatory (in 1913–14 its first director) and (from 1925) at the Lysenko Music and Drama Institute. He also performed as a pianist in Saint Petersburg, Kyiv, and Odesa. His students included Vladimir Horowitz, A. Brailowsky, and Kostiantyn Mykhailov. Among his main works are the opera Valeria (1923), the symphonic Little Russian Fantasy (1882), a piano concerto (1881; the first such work for modern piano in Ukrainian music), works for piano solo, and the Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom for choir.




https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q438450 (https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q438450)3

https://uk.wikipedia.org/wiki/Пухальський_Володимир_В'ячеславович (https://uk.wikipedia.org/wiki/Пухальський_Володимир_В'ячеславович)   (in Ukrainian)

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wladimir_Puchalsk (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wladimir_Puchalsk)i  (in German - calls him "Polish/Ukrainian/Russian")

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Władimir_Puchalski (https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Władimir_Puchalski) (in Polish - calles him Russian and Ukrainain)

https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Пухальский,_Владимир_Вячеславович (https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Пухальский,_Владимир_Вячеславович)  - (in Russian - calls him Russian and Soviet!)


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: britishcomposer on March 03, 2019, 05:54:07 pm
I have uploaded a short suite from Boris Lyatoshinsky's opera "The Golden Tire". (Also called The Golden Ring. I am not sure about this.)
The young Ukrainian conductor Oksana Lyniv programmed this for her concert with the Düsselforfer Symphoniker.
As far as I know there is no commercial recording of this suite so perhaps the Lyatoshinsky enthusiasts will be delighted.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 04, 2019, 02:21:18 pm
I saw it translated as "The Golden Crown" on a youtube link where the same conductor was conducting the Odessa National Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: britishcomposer on March 04, 2019, 05:11:37 pm
Thank you, Christopher!
This seems to be correct. The German title was given as „Der goldene Reif“, an old, formal word for crown or ring. Maybe someone translated this into English as „tire“ without exactly knowing about this old meaning of „Reif“. The similar German word „Reifen“ means „tire“.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on March 05, 2019, 01:20:07 pm
Thank you, Christopher!
This seems to be correct. The German title was given as „Der goldene Reif“, an old, formal word for crown or ring. Maybe someone translated this into English as „tire“ without exactly knowing about this old meaning of „Reif“. The similar German word „Reifen“ means „tire“.

How about "halo"?

Google Translate renders the title "Zolotiy Obruch" (Золотий Обруч)  as "Golden Hoop"!

When I type "Золотий Обруч" into the Yandex search engine (which is good for Ukrainian, Russian, etc) and search for images - I get this - https://yandex.ua/images/search?text=Золотий%20Обруч (https://yandex.ua/images/search?text=Золотий%20Обруч) - from which one might decide that "Golden Bracelet" could be the best translation.


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: britishcomposer on March 05, 2019, 07:14:20 pm
Bracelet is a fine word for the German Reif I think. But shall I now rename everything again.. ;)


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: christopher on July 04, 2019, 01:35:03 am
I've been passed a few Ukrainian orchestral pieces from the archives of Ukraine Radio by late-romantic composers and have put in the downloads section.

Mykhaylo Adamovych Skorulskyi - 1887-1950 - Mykyta Kozhumiaka - symphonic poem (translates as Mykita the Tanner - an East Slavic legend which is summarised here - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikita_the_Tanner (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikita_the_Tanner)   (unfortunately the first couple of bars are missing).

Stanyslav Pylypovych Lyudkevych (1879-1979) - Melancholic Waltz

Lysenko, Mykola Vitaliyovych (1842-1912) - Ukrainian Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra, Op.34



Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: dhibbard on July 04, 2019, 02:17:18 am
Thank you Christopher for the downloads from Ukrainian Radio.. esp. the  Melancholic Waltz !!


Title: Re: Ukrainian Music
Post by: rkhenderson on July 04, 2019, 07:39:25 am
I noticed a few updates to this site of Ukrainian music:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzGcjCdjL7Xaj8MoaAQi3IA/videos (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzGcjCdjL7Xaj8MoaAQi3IA/videos)

Including D. Kaminsky Violin Concerto No. 2 and Hubarenko Liebestod, Symphony-ballet.