The Art-Music Forum

Little-known music of all eras => Downloads discussion => Topic started by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 04:07:37 pm



Title: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 04:07:37 pm
I am so happy to have another contributor in this string!!


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on May 13, 2013, 04:15:17 pm
Thanks Chris.... glad to contribute!! 


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 04:28:01 pm
I have Aladov's (or Aladau's) Sinfonietta, and a couple of his songs, but that's it I'm afraid. Has his Symph 10 been recorded?


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 04:47:06 pm
we GREATLY look forward to those!


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on May 13, 2013, 05:32:43 pm
Tikotsky's Sym No 6 is interesting.....probably the main problem in getting these works re-recorded on CD is that no one like Neeme Jarvi (for Estonia) or V. Sinaisky (or other Latvian conductors) is around to champion ( or "carry the torch") the symphonic works of Belarus.     


Dave


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on May 13, 2013, 05:34:57 pm
yes  I think someone has it on this list... it is very rare.

does Holger  have it?


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 05:38:45 pm
Tikotsky's Sym No 6 is interesting.....probably the main problem in getting these works re-recorded on CD is that no one like Neeme Jarvi (for Estonia) or V. Sinaisky (or other Latvian conductors) is around to champion ( or "carry the torch") the symphonic works of Belarus.     


Dave

I wonder if that's as much a reflection of the current political system in that country, where any kind of initiative is discouraged or outright squashed. 


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 11:33:02 pm
Most people in Belarus speak Russian by choice, but are quite particular that they are Belarusian thank you very much. There are two versions of Belarusian: the one modified and approved by the communists and the one that existed before! Very complicated.... The Soviet way of diminishing Ukrainian and Belarusian was to make the Russian language the one for urban successful educated types, so the other languages came to be seen as the languages of simple funny bumpkins. Even now, when Russians hear Ukrainian/Belarusian (the languages, or their accents in Russian), they often snigger!


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: georghann on May 13, 2013, 11:49:26 pm
More of that Belorussian music! Thank you!


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Dundonnell on May 14, 2013, 12:46:07 am
With the greatest of respect, the last dozen posts should really be located in the Downloads Discussion section.

As is stated quite clearly on the Home Page this section is for Downloads and announcements of downloads only. "NO comments or discussion here thank you"

Those members who go to the Downloads section expecting to find a piece of music for download are now encountering an extended discussion. That discussion is great and very welcome but it should be conducted in the Downloads Discussion section :)


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: the Administration on May 14, 2013, 09:41:45 am
With the greatest of respect, the last dozen posts should really be located in the Downloads Discussion section.

Thanks for drawing attention to this situation, Mr. D. As you suggest, I've transferred all the posts lacking download announcements to this discussion area.


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: rkhenderson on May 30, 2013, 07:53:04 pm
Thanks very much for the Tikotsky Symphony No. 4. I was looking for this piece for a long time!
I enjoy these sort of anachronistic works where if you were blindfolded and asked to guess the
date of composition you would guess 50 (or more) years earlier!


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on June 02, 2013, 04:50:16 pm
I can see by the # of downloads on my mediafire account these are a popular download.   Also,  May 14 (when these were posted) had the most people logged in ever.... wow!

Dave


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Gauk on July 08, 2013, 09:01:19 am
I see that Tikotsky's 6th has now appeared on YT in fyrexianoff's channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/fyrexianoff/videos (http://www.youtube.com/user/fyrexianoff/videos)


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on July 09, 2013, 01:13:19 am
excellent !!   I also subscribe to his channel.   Tikotsky and Vagner are composers that need  their works known.   Weinberg was only on Melodiya at one time, now Naxos and Chandos are recording the symphonic cycle.

Dave


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Gauk on July 09, 2013, 07:29:34 am
I remember the first UK issue on LP of what was then written Vainberg's 4th Symphony and Violin Concerto! That was a while ago. How different now ...


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Elroel on July 10, 2013, 06:47:57 pm
I think more of us are subscribers to Tony's blog. For a short time he was a member on the Unsung Composers forum as well.



Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 11, 2013, 10:42:09 am
Please can you provide a link to his blog?


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Elroel on July 12, 2013, 11:14:24 am
Here you find Tony's blog. MARVELOUS!!!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/feed/UCmYq0b8VKp61qD8EWE5K-wg


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 13, 2013, 08:34:41 am
Found this at
http://intoclassics.net/news/2010-09-05-18379

unfortunately the links no longer work..

Anthology of Belarusian Classical music (2 CD)
CD1.
1. Oleg Hodosko. Symphony № 4 "White Russia"
2. Viktor Voytik. Symphonic Suite "Fun." Part number 3 "Round Dance".
3. Part number 4. "Kolyadniki."
4. Dmitry Smolskiy. "Symphonic Variations."
5. Andrei Mdivani. "Ostinato". Concert Piece for large symphony orchestra.
6. Jury Semenyako. Svetlana Aria from the opera "Prickly Rose".
7. Sergei Cortez. Overture to the Spanish comedy.
8. Eugene Glebov. Adagio Rose and the Little Prince from the Ballet "The Little Prince".
9. Anatoly Bogatyrev. Waltz from the music to the drama by M. Lermontov "Masquerade".
CD2.
10. Andrei Mdivani. Symphony number 6 "Polotsk letters." Part 1. "Faces."
11. Vladimir grandmother. Symphony number 1, part 2.
12. Part 3.
13. Galina Gorelova. Concerto for Oboe and String Orchestra. Part 3, "quips."
14. Eugene Poplawski. "Dea Luna".
15. Vyacheslav Kuznetsov. Adagio from an imaginary ballet.
16. Igor Luchenok. Ave Maria.
17. Vladimir Soltan. Concert Waltz for large symphony orchestra.
Duration: 2:14:27
 
Performed by
the State Symphony Orchestra of Radio and Television of Russia. Soloists: Gregory Hunanyan, violin (1) Les Lute, soprano (6.16), Andrey Tkachev, oboe (13). Conductor: Mikhail Snitko. State Academic Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Belarus. Conductor: Mikhail Snitko. Recorded in 2002.

Glebov is the one I am most familiar with..esp the Little Prince ballet
A few of his works are on utube.
eg..
http://youtu.be/hQm2TXvoCmg


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on July 13, 2013, 03:51:30 pm
Its available on Ebay right now
http://www.ebay.com/itm/SNITKO-Khodosko-Voitik-Smolsky-Mdivani-Glebov-Bogatyrev-Poplavsky-So-2CD-RUS-NEW-/161010469346?pt=Music_CDs&hash=item257cf8c9e2

this is a limited production CD... once it is gone, it is gone.

Dave


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 15, 2013, 11:25:59 am
Found this at
http://intoclassics.net/news/2010-09-05-18379

unfortunately the links no longer work..

Anthology of Belarusian Classical music (2 CD)
CD1.
1. Oleg Hodosko. Symphony № 4 "White Russia"
2. Viktor Voytik. Symphonic Suite "Fun." Part number 3 "Round Dance".
3. Part number 4. "Kolyadniki."
4. Dmitry Smolskiy. "Symphonic Variations."
5. Andrei Mdivani. "Ostinato". Concert Piece for large symphony orchestra.
6. Jury Semenyako. Svetlana Aria from the opera "Prickly Rose".
7. Sergei Cortez. Overture to the Spanish comedy.
8. Eugene Glebov. Adagio Rose and the Little Prince from the Ballet "The Little Prince".
9. Anatoly Bogatyrev. Waltz from the music to the drama by M. Lermontov "Masquerade".
CD2.
10. Andrei Mdivani. Symphony number 6 "Polotsk letters." Part 1. "Faces."
11. Vladimir grandmother. Symphony number 1, part 2.
12. Part 3.
13. Galina Gorelova. Concerto for Oboe and String Orchestra. Part 3, "quips."
14. Eugene Poplawski. "Dea Luna".
15. Vyacheslav Kuznetsov. Adagio from an imaginary ballet.
16. Igor Luchenok. Ave Maria.
17. Vladimir Soltan. Concert Waltz for large symphony orchestra.
Duration: 2:14:27
 
Performed by
the State Symphony Orchestra of Radio and Television of Russia. Soloists: Gregory Hunanyan, violin (1) Les Lute, soprano (6.16), Andrey Tkachev, oboe (13). Conductor: Mikhail Snitko. State Academic Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Belarus. Conductor: Mikhail Snitko. Recorded in 2002.





I have this CD, bought it in Minsk. Number 11 is not Vladimir Grandmother - looks like google translate has translated his surname which is Babkov!



Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 15, 2013, 04:56:50 pm
Found this at
http://intoclassics.net/news/2010-09-05-18379

unfortunately the links no longer work..

Anthology of Belarusian Classical music (2 CD)
CD1.
1. Oleg Hodosko. Symphony № 4 "White Russia"
2. Viktor Voytik. Symphonic Suite "Fun." Part number 3 "Round Dance".
3. Part number 4. "Kolyadniki."
4. Dmitry Smolskiy. "Symphonic Variations."
5. Andrei Mdivani. "Ostinato". Concert Piece for large symphony orchestra.
6. Jury Semenyako. Svetlana Aria from the opera "Prickly Rose".
7. Sergei Cortez. Overture to the Spanish comedy.
8. Eugene Glebov. Adagio Rose and the Little Prince from the Ballet "The Little Prince".
9. Anatoly Bogatyrev. Waltz from the music to the drama by M. Lermontov "Masquerade".
CD2.
10. Andrei Mdivani. Symphony number 6 "Polotsk letters." Part 1. "Faces."
11. Vladimir grandmother. Symphony number 1, part 2.
12. Part 3.
13. Galina Gorelova. Concerto for Oboe and String Orchestra. Part 3, "quips."
14. Eugene Poplawski. "Dea Luna".
15. Vyacheslav Kuznetsov. Adagio from an imaginary ballet.
16. Igor Luchenok. Ave Maria.
17. Vladimir Soltan. Concert Waltz for large symphony orchestra.
Duration: 2:14:27
 
Performed by
the State Symphony Orchestra of Radio and Television of Russia. Soloists: Gregory Hunanyan, violin (1) Les Lute, soprano (6.16), Andrey Tkachev, oboe (13). Conductor: Mikhail Snitko. State Academic Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Belarus. Conductor: Mikhail Snitko. Recorded in 2002.





I have this CD, bought it in Minsk. Number 11 is not Vladimir Grandmother - looks like google translate has translated his surname which is Babkov!



so much for translations..It even translates Bogoslovsky to Theology as it does here:
http://intoclassics.net/news/2009-11-01-10447

Is Minsk in Bylorussia?
If so, there is this also gifted composer.

Abeliovich, Lew (1912 –1985 ) - Aria for Violin and Orchestra       
Minsk Chamber Orchestra
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/38218

Abeliovich, Lew (1912 –1985) - Symphony No.3   
Unknown performer
http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/45982



Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 16, 2013, 01:09:20 am
Yes, Minsk is the capital of BELARUS (one day this forum will get the name right....!  :) )


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 16, 2013, 04:29:59 am
Yes, Minsk is the capital of BELARUS (one day this forum will get the name right....!  :) )
don't expect much..America is in a very rapid decline intellectually..


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: kyjo on July 16, 2013, 04:47:19 am
Yes, Minsk is the capital of BELARUS (one day this forum will get the name right....!  :) )
don't expect much..America is in a very rapid decline intellectually..

Sad but very true :(


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 16, 2013, 10:10:01 am
I totally disagree!  Never liked lazy European reflex of America-bashing, it's just too easy.  Most ideas and inventions which power this world are American, and hurray to that.

Anyway, back to Belarus....!


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 27, 2013, 03:32:34 am
I totally disagree!  Never liked lazy European reflex of America-bashing, it's just too easy.  Most ideas and inventions which power this world are American, and hurray to that.

Anyway, back to Belarus....!
America was....our colleges are now the habitat of narcissistic drones, not intellectuals.
Now back to Belarus


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: dhibbard on December 16, 2013, 05:02:41 pm
Here is some info about Bogatyrev  (Wiki):


Anatoly Bogatyrev

Anatoly Vasilyevich Bogatyrev (Belarusian: Анатоль Васільевіч Багатыроў; August 13 [O.S. July 31] 1913 – 2003) was a Belarusian composer and music teacher, seen as one of the leaders of the national school of Belarusian music.

Bogatyrev was born in Vitebsk, the son of a language teacher. He studied at the Vitebsk Music School, the Minsk School of Music, and the Conservatory of Belarus where he was taught composition by Vasily Zolotarev, a pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov.  He came to prominence while still in his twenties, being appointed chairman of the board of the Belarusian Union of Composers in 1938, and receiving the Stalin Prize in 1941. In 1948 he began teaching composition at the National Conservatory, Minsk, where he later became a deputy director.  He joined the CPSU in 1954, and was made a People's Artist of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic in 1968. Bogatyrev died in 2003.




Selected works

Stage
In the Forests of Polesie, opera (28 August 1939, Minsk). After Yakub Kolas' "The Swamp".
Incidental music to Romashov's The Undimmed Stars (1941).
Nadezhda Durova, opera (22 December 1956, Minsk).
Incidental music to Lermontov's Masquerade.[3][5][6][7]


Vocal and choral
Poem on the Tale of a Bear, for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra (1937). After Pushkin's "Tale of the Female Bear".
The People of Leningrad, cantata (1941).
To the Belarusian Partisans, cantata (1943).
Belarus, cantata (1949).
Belarusian Songs, cantata (1967). Words: traditional and by Nil Gilevich.[3][4][7][8]

Orchestral
Symphony no. 1 (1946).
Symphony no. 2 (1947).
Concerto for Cello (1962).
Concerto for Double Bass (1964).
Chamber music[edit]Trio for violin, cello and piano (1935).
String Quartet (1941).
Variations and Suite on Byron's Manfred, for piano.



I'll post his Symphony No 1 shortly... interesting that an indirect student of Rimsky-Korsakov died as recently as 2003. 


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Jolly Roger on January 17, 2014, 03:28:24 am
this may be useful for Belorussian enthusiasts:

http://classical-music-online.net/stat/?person_type=composer&type=country_persons&country=BLR


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 01, 2016, 12:40:20 am
I have posted up two pieces by Yauhen Tsikotski (Evgeny Tikotsky in Russian, 1893-1958):

- The Song of the Stormy Petrel - heroic poem after Maxim Gorky (written 1920, revised in 1936)
- Lyavonikha

Lyavonikha is the name of a dance which is popular in Belarus, and this is Tsikotski's arrangement of it. According to (Russian) Wikipedia:

It is performed in pairs with solo variations also being performed under the same name. It has comic content, is dynamic and cheerful. A lively tempo in 2/4. The dance consists of traditional patterns (circle, asterisk, snake, gate), with different transition lines in pairs or with a change of partners and whirling in pairs, arm in arm. At weddings, "Lyavonikha" is the main dance and is often accompanied with rhyming playful couplets. In some areas of Belarus "Lyavonikha" is performed as a solo dance. Performers go one by one out in the middle of the circle and dance as best they can. Movements of the dancers are very different - the tramp, gallop,.... "Lyavonikha" has entered the repertoire of many professional and amateur groups, and is used in the ballet "The Nightingale" by Mikhail Kroshner, and "Prince-Lake" by Vassili Zolotarev.


The Song of the Stormy Petrel was a poem written by revolutionary Russian write Maxim Gorky in 1901 and is an important piece of Russian revolutionary literature. It was swiftly banned by the censors and Gorky was arrested.  It is halfway between prose and poetry, and was written in unrhymed trochaic tetrameter, which when read aloud gives its rhythm a powerful sense of urgency and something-dramatic-about-to-happen. Reportedly it was one of Lenin’s favourite works.

The Russian for stormy petrel is “burevestnik” which can be translated as “storm herald” or “storm bringer”.

From Wikipedia:
Maxim Gorky wrote "The Song of the Storm Petrel" in March 1901 in Nizhny Novgorod. It is believed that originally the text was part of a larger piece, called "Spring Melodies" and subtitled "Fantasy" . In this "fantasy", the author overhears a conversation of birds outside his window on a late-winter day: a crow, a raven, and a bullfinch representing the monarchist establishment; sparrows, "lesser people"; and anti-establishment siskins. As the birds discussing the approach of the spring, it is one of the siskins who sings to his comrades "the Song of the Stormy Petrel, which he had overheard somewhere", which appears as the "fantasy's" finale. In the "Song", the action takes place on an ocean coast, far from the streets of a central Russian town; the language calling for revolution is coded—the proud stormy petrel, unafraid of the storm (that is, revolution), as all other birds cower.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Song_of_the_Stormy_Petrel  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Song_of_the_Stormy_Petrel)

Text as follows (English translation):

    High above the silvery ocean winds are gathering the storm-clouds, and between the clouds and ocean proudly wheels the Stormy Petrel, like a streak of sable lightning.

Now his wing the wave caresses, now he rises like an arrow, cleaving clouds and crying fiercely, while the clouds detect a rapture in the bird's courageous crying.

In that crying sounds a craving for the tempest! Sounds the flaming of his passion, of his anger, of his confidence in triumph.

The gulls are moaning in their terror--moaning, darting o'er the waters, and would gladly hide their horror in the inky depths of ocean.

And the grebes are also moaning. Not for them the nameless rapture of the struggle. They are frightened by the crashing of the thunder.

And the foolish penguins cower in the crevices of rocks, while alone the Stormy Petrel proudly wheels above the ocean, o'er the silver-frothing waters.

Ever lower, ever blacker, sink the stormclouds to the sea, and the singing waves are mounting in their yearning toward the thunder.

Strikes the thunder. Now the waters fiercely battle with the winds. And the winds in fury seize them in unbreakable embrace, hurtling down the emerald masses to be shattered on the cliffs.

Like a streak of sable lightning wheels and cries the Stormy Petrel, piercing storm-clouds like an arrow, cutting swiftly through the waters.

He is coursing like a Demon, the black Demon of the tempest, ever laughing, ever sobbing--he is laughing at the storm-clouds, he is sobbing with his rapture.

In the crashing of the thunder the wise Demon hears a murmur of exhaustion. And he is knows the strom will die and the sun will be triumphant; the sun will always be triumphant!

The waters roar. The thunder crashes. Livid lightning flares in stormclouds high above the seething ocean, and the flaming darts are captured and extinguished by the waters, while the serpentine reflections writhe, expiring, in the deep.

It's the storm! The storm is breaking!

Still the valiant Stormy Petrel proudly wheels amond the lightning, o'er the roaring, raging ocean, and his cry resounds exultant, like a prophecy of triumph--

Let it break in all its fury!


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 06, 2016, 12:17:48 am
I've posted up a few pieces by Alyaksei Turankou (1886-1958 - Alexei Turenkov in Russian).  I'm particularly pleased to have found his "Doina - Moldavian Melody" - I've heard it played so often by street musicians all over Russia/Belarus/Ukraine and Moldova and always wondered what it is.  A version of it also featured in the black and white film "The Scarlet Empress" about Catherine the Great, in the wedding feast scene.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 08, 2016, 03:47:24 pm
Some biographical info on Turankou:

Information taken from both his Belarusian and Russian wikipedia pages.  Interestingly the Russian one completely omits that he was arrested, convicted by the NKVD and sent to the Gulag....

Born January 21, 1886 in St. Petersburg into a peasant family. From 1911 to1914 he studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory in composition, was a student of composer Alexey Liadov and Nikolai Sokolov.

From 1918 Turenkov lived and worked in Gomel in Belarus where he was in charge of the music section of the city department of public education. He also taught at the local music school, played a part in the Gomel Symphony Orchestra, directed the choral amateur groups, later headed the music section of the Gomel oblast department of education. In 1934 he moved to Minsk where he was a deputy of the Supreme Soviet of the Byelorussian SSR. During the Second World War, he remained in occupied territory. In 1941-1944, he was an employee at the publisher VSHPLM (Publisher of School Textbooks and Literature for Young People) in Minsk and at the publisher Konstantin Ezovitov in Riga.

He was arrested in Minsk on 22.07.1944 and convicted by the extrajudicial bodies of the NKVD on 06.23.1945 as a "helper of the German occupiers”. Sentenced to 10 year hard labour and 5 years in prison with confiscation of property rights. He was transported to one of the concentration camps of the Gulag, where, according to A. Tsarankov, he almost died of hunger. He was released by 1947 and rehabilitated by the judicial board for criminal cases of the Supreme Court of the BSSR on 10.21.1959.

Turenkov made a great contribution to the development of Belarusian musical art, and became one of the founders of the choir genres, romance and popular songs in the Belarusian music. He was the author of a large number of pieces of music, including operas, ballets, suites, cantatas, orchestral works, songs, (including poems by A. Prokofiev, L. Oshanin, M. Rilsky, V. Lebedev-Kumach, E. Dolmatovski, M. Matusovsky , A. Zharov, Ya. Kupala, M. Tank and other well-known Soviet poets). He was the composer of music to films "The Fire Years" and "The Janusz Family." In 1940 Turenkov was awarded the title of Honored Artist of the Belarusian SSR.

He wrote the opera "The Flower of Happiness" (libretto by V. Borisevich, P. Brovka and P. Glebka, 1939), "Clear Dawn", and the ballet "Forest Fairy Tale". He wrote music for many dramatic performances ("Pinsk gentry" and others.) and for movies. He arranged Belarusian folk songs. Of particular importance in his work is the opera "The Flower of Happiness", which is defined by poetry, lyricism, coupled with national folk music, and music performance precision in the depiction of images and witty folk humour

He died September 27, 1958 and is buried in the Military Cemetery in Minsk.


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Latvian on July 09, 2016, 02:01:08 pm
Quote
Interestingly the Russian one completely omits that he was arrested, convicted by the NKVD and sent to the Gulag....

I would say "typically" rather than "interestingly." Russian (particularly Soviet-era) sources seem to usually gloss over or omit this sort of information. One has to consult ethnic sources (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Latvian, etc.) to learn about these details.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on July 11, 2016, 01:05:05 am
Quote
Interestingly the Russian one completely omits that he was arrested, convicted by the NKVD and sent to the Gulag....

I would say "typically" rather than "interestingly." Russian (particularly Soviet-era) sources seem to usually gloss over or omit this sort of information. One has to consult ethnic sources (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Latvian, etc.) to learn about these details.

"Interestingly" was ironic...  ;)


Title: Re: Belorussian Music
Post by: Latvian on July 11, 2016, 02:28:41 am
Quote
"Interestingly" was ironic...  Wink

I should have realized!  :-[


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 02:41:49 pm
I have posted up some music by the Belarusian composer Ryhor Pukst (1900-1960).

Ryhor is Belarusian for Grigory.  Information taken from wikipedia in various languages, using google-translate:

Grigory Kanstantynavich Pukst (27 November 1900 in Gomel - November 11, 1960, in Minsk, Belarus) - Belarusian composer. Honoured worker of BSSR arts (1955).

He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 1928 where he was in the composition class of Julius Conyus. In 1929 he taught at the Omsk musical technical school, in 1932 moved to the Byelorussian SSR. Before World War II taught the Gomel musical college, then in 1945 - at the Belarusian State Conservatory, a music school and music school in Minsk. Since 1952 - choirmaster, then the artistic director of music broadcasting at Belarusian Radio.

Composer of operas "Masheka" opera (1945, on Kupala's poem "The Grave Lion"), "Marinka" (1955), "Svityazanka", 6 symphonies, choruses, songs. Author of famous "Perapёlachki" (1947). He wrote music for films and theater.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 02:55:55 pm
I have posted up some music by the Belarusian composer Mikalai Churkin (1869-1964).

From wikipedia:


Nikolai Churkin (May 21, 1869 Stsepanavan, Armenia - December 27, 1964) - Belarusian composer and folklorist, one of the founders of the Belarusian professional music. People's Artist of Belarus (1949).

He graduated from the musical vuchshishcha Russian Musical Society in Tiflis (1892, class of M. Ippolitova-Ivanov), St. Petersburg AM (1899). A teacher, he taught music and drawing, guided by amateur choirs in Baku, Kaunas (1903), Vilnius (1905). In Belarus, in 1914, a teacher and a teacher's seminary schools, Head of Music subsection county executive committee, the organizer of amateur in Mstislavl, from 1924 teacher of pedagogical college in Mogilev, 1935 in Minsk.

He collected more than 3 thousand. Tunes songs and dances of different nations (Belarusian, Georgian, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Polish, Lithuanian, Tajik). 53 Belarusian tunes in his record and placed in the processing of "Belarusian collection" E. Romanova (No. 7, 1910.); made collections of "Belarusian folk songs and dances" (1949) and "The Belarusian folk songs" (1959).

One of the founders of the Belarusian professional music, the founder of the national symphonic genre, music for children. His music is characterized by optimism, strict classical form, melody, based on the Belarusian musical folklore. Among the works: the opera "Emancipation of Labour" (pastes thousand nine hundred twenty-two.) "Adolescence" by Kupala (piano, 1959-64), radyёopera for children "mittens" (1948 pastes.); musical comedy "Kok sagyz" (1939 pastes.), "Song of the Berezina" (1947 pastes.); 3 Simfonetta (1 925, "Belarusian picture"; one thousand nine hundred forty-nine, 1955), 4 symphonic suites; 4 suites, and the overture "In memory of Yanka Kupala" (1952) for orchestra of Belarusian folk instruments; 11 string quartets, choirs, songs; music for dramatic performances; folk songs and dances, songs for children on the words of the Belarusian poets.


May 21, 1869 was born Nikolai Churkin. Soviet composer, folklorist graduated from the Tbilisi School of Music in composition. He worked as a music teacher (1892-1914) in Baku, Kaunas and Vilnius. Since 1914 - in Belarus. He collected folk music, including Belarus (more than 3000 records, and many are included in the collection of Belarusian folk songs and dances, published in 1910, 1949, 1959).

Churkin belongs to the first creators of Belarusian Soviet opera ( "Emancipation of Labour", 1922). He - the founder of the national symphony genre (Sinfonietta "Belarus pictures", 1925). Among the works Churkin also a children's radio opera "The Glove" (1940), the musical comedy "The Song of the Berezina" (1947), pieces for symphony and wind orchestra, orchestra of folk instruments, chamber and instrumental ensembles (in t. Ch. 11 quartets ), choruses and songs to the words of Soviet poets, and others.



Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 04:24:51 pm
I have posted up some works by Mikalai Aladau (1890-1972).

("Aladov" in Russian)

From Wikipedia (google translate):

Nikolai Aladov (9 December (21 December on the Gregorian calendar) 1890, St. Petersburg - 4 snezhnya 1972 Minsk, Belarus) - Belarusian composer and teacher. People's Artist of the Byelorussian SSR (1955).

In 1910 he graduated from the St. Petersburg Conservatory externally. During the Civil War, he worked in East Conservatory in Kazan, and in 1923 at the State Institute of Musical Sciences in Moscow. He was a song-Belarusian commission. He arrived in Minsk in 1924. One of the founders and first teachers of the Belarusian Music College and Conservatory. Since 1946 - Professor, and in the years 1944-1948 - Director of the Conservatory. In 1932 he participated in the creation of the Belarusian composers' organization. [1] During the war, in 1941-1944 he taught at the Saratov Conservatory.

He worked in many genres of music. His works of the 1920s and 1930s laid the foundation for many of the Belarusian professional music genres: processing folk songs, cantatas, vocal and symphonic poem, chamber and instrumental ensemble romance. He gave the first in the Belarusian music samples dramatic (first, 1930) and the lyric-psychological (fourth, 1953-54, and the fifth, 1956) Symphony. Comprehensive solutions distinctive genre opera "Taras on Parnassus" is defined by the author as music and drama joke in one act and written by Belarusian anonymous poem "Taras on Parnassus" and "Eneida inside out" and the poem V.Dunina-Marcinkiewicz "Hapon". [1 ]

Key shaped creative industries - lyric and dramatic. psychological and lyrical epic genre. An important place in the musical heritage occupy gumarystyyachnyya and satirical images. The composer characterized symfanichnasts musical thinking, extensive use of polyphony, proactive approach to folk material. Editor of many music publications (including works M.Churkina and R.Puksta), collector and researcher of Belarusian, Mari, Chuvash and Yakut folklore.

For the first time I met with the Yanka Kupala in September 1923, when Kupala with friends Inbelkult attended the All-Union Agricultural Exhibition in Moscow and became acquainted at that time with the literary and the musical community of the Russian capital. Domes Aladova interested in creativity, befriended him and helped move the composer in Minsk. Between the families of Kupala and Aladova established friendly relations. In 1923 he wrote his first songs on poems by Kupala "Byasputnasts", "C linden and birch broom", "summer", which is selected from the collection of the "Heritage", donated by the poet. Set to music many poems Kupala. [3]

The largest work on the words Kupala - vocal-symphonic poem for 5 soloists, choir and symphony arkestru "Over the River Aresay" (1933). The first work was performed by soloists, chorus and symphony arkestru Belarusian Radio under the direction of Aladova May 28, 1935 during the celebration of the 30th anniversary of the literary activity of Kupala.

Symphony (1921, 1930, 1951, 1953-54, 1956, 1960, 1963, 1965, 1967 1971)
Fortepiyanny Quintet (1925)
Cantata "10 Years" (1927)
Opera "Taras on Parnassus" (1927)
The vocal-symphonic poem "Over the River Aresay" (1933)
The collection of songs on poems by Kupala and Maxim Bogdanovich
Symphonic Poem "From the diary of a partisan" (1942)
Symphony-ballad "In the grim days" (1942)
Opera "Andrew Kosten" (1947)
Cantata "Forty Years" (1947)
Suites fantasy for symphony arkestru (1950)
Concert Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra (1950)


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 04:33:55 pm
I have posted up a piece by Karol Jelski (1780-1855).

Karol Jelski – Doctor of Medicine, talented amateur musician, received professional training from renowned musicians Kiefeling and Daschinsky. He was the composer of several instrumental chamber works, including Polonaise of 1837. He lived in the family estate of Dudzichny (now Pukhavichy district) and was a descendant of an old Belarusian family, which brought to the world many talented people, including musician-composers such as his sons Alyaksandr (1834-1916) and Mikhail (1831-1904).


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 04:40:28 pm
I have posted up a piece by Mikhail Yaukhimavich Kroshner (1900-1942).

From wikipedia:

Mikhail Yaukhimavich Kroshner (1900-1942) - Belarusian composer. Honoured Artist of the BSSR (1940).

In 1918-1931 he worked in concert organizations and theatres in Kiev and Moscow. He graduated in 1937 from the Belarusian Conservatory composition class of V.A. Zolotarev. In 1933-1938 he worked at the State Theatre of Opera and Ballet Theatre of Belarus.

The author of the first national Belarusian ballet "Nightingale" (based on the novel of S. Bedulev). In 1939, the ballet "The Nightingale" was staged at the Odessa Opera and Ballet Theater. He also wrote the music for the play "Tsvey kunimleh" ( "Two klutzes ") by A. Goldfadena in the State Jewish Theatre of the Byelorussian SSR (1940). Most of the creative heritage of the composer himself, and died during the German occupation of Belarus.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 05:09:01 pm
I have posted up some works by Mikalai Ravensky (1886-1953).

His piece "Mahutny Bozha" (Almighty God) is wildly popular in Belarus and is an unofficial national anthem. It exists in many forms - a capella, choir with organ, solo....

from Wikipedia:

Nikolay Ravensky (5 December 1886 Kaplantsy estate, Igumen county now Berezino district, Minsk region - March 9, 1953, Leuven, Belgium) - Belarusian composer, conductor, music critic.

He composed music to several poems of Belarusian poets, author of music for the hymn "Almighty God", and composed religious music.

Born 1886 on the Kaplantsy estate in Igumen County (now the Cherven District). His father was the gardener.

With five years of singing in the church choir, he studied at the village school. In 1895 he received the full content of the Minsk Cathedral Choir, where he received his initial musical education. In 1903 he was sent to the Minsk monastery as a conductor of the Gdańsk choir.

In 1905 he received from the bishop of the direction in Novogrudok, where he worked as conductor of the  church choir and taught music in schools. In 1912-1914 he took courses in a choir in Moscow. With the outbreak of World War II he was evacuated from Novogrudok, and worked as a clerk and storekeeper in military construction. From 1917 – he was a teacher of singing and music in Igumen.

In 1919 he moved to Minsk, worked as conductor in a  church choir, and as a school teacher. In 1920 he began to work as head of the choir of the Belarusian Labor Club (Social Revolutionary) in Minsk. At this time were his first compositions - songs on poems by Maxim Bogdanovich, Constance Buylo, introduction to the poem "Hapon" Vincent Dunin-Marcinkiewicz, the song "Oh, Neman River" to words by Tishka Gartnogo. In 1922 in Minsk came the peak of his choral repertoire - "Collection of Songs with notes." After the banning of the Socialist-Revolutionaries he was arrested: on release he for some time worked as choirmaster at the Belarusian State Academic Theatre (1923).

In 1923 he moved to Moscow to continue his musical education, where he lived for seven years, after graduating in 1927 from the music college named after Stasov in 1930, in the composer conservatory department. At the same time in 1924-1930 he was a corresponding member of the Belarusian Academy of Sciences. In Moscow, Ravensky wrote songs to the words by Vladimir Dubovka and Yanka Kupala. Under the influence of V. Dubovka he turned to music criticism and wrote two critical articles in "The Hill".

In March 1930 he taught at the College of Music, the Belarusian State Conservatory. In 1938, he was expelled from the Composers' Union after his brother Anton was shot by Stalinists. His brother Alexander was later shot by the Nazis at the beginning of the second world war). With his first wife he had daughters. One of them, Lola, was connected to Isaiah Kazinets (a Jewish-Belarusian engineer and a leader of the Minsk Underground Resistance) and was  shot by the Gestapo after his arrest.  Another, Olga (married surname - Alekseenko) – was a soloist of the choir of the Belarusian Radio and TV

 In 1940 he moved to Mogilov, but a year later returned to Minsk, which was under occupation. Here on 23 June 1941 all his manuscripts perished in a fire. 

From 1943 he was the regent of the church choir in Igumen. In 1944, he returned to Minsk. With the start of the Soviet offensive he emigrated to Germany, while his wife and children remained in the BSSR. He worked as a worker at a sawmill near Munich, and taught in the Belarusian Gymnasium in Regensburg and Osterhofene.

From 1950, in Belgium in Leuven university he created a student ensemble of the Belarusian music. He gave many concert in Western Europe. He recorded phonograph records with Belarusian secular and religious songs. In his last years he was ill with something. He is buried in Leuven.

He arranged Belarusian folk songs and songs on poems by Maxim Bogdanovich ( "The Chase", "Slutsk weavers" and others.), Yanka Kupala, Yakub Kolas ( "My country", "Edge of our poor" and others.) K. Buylo ( "I love our land", a historical suite "mound" poem of the same name), T. Gartnogo, Z. Bedulev, which partly included in his "songs from the notes" (1922), V. Dubovka ( "Oh Belarus my dog rose "); Belarusian opera "Bronislava" (libretto by Vladimir Dubovka, not completed); Belarusian operetta "aerial" (by V. Dunin-Marcinkiewicz); music on texts of church prayers, including "Almighty God" (to words by N. Arsenyev).

MAHUTNY BOZHA:

"Almighty God" (author's name - "Prayer") - a poem written by Natalia Arsenyev in 1943. In 1947, Ravensky put it to music, after which "Almighty God" for the Belarusian émigré movement has become a real religious hymn.The piece has also been proposed as the official national anthem. "Mahutny Bozha" became a religious anthem, which is played at church services and other events.  In the autocephalous churches of the Belarusian Diaspora of worship usually ends with the singing of Mahutny Bozha.

Mahutny Boža! Uladar susvietaŭ,
vialikich soncaŭ i serc malych!
Nad Bielarusiaj, cichaj i vietlaj,
rassyp pramienni svaje chvaly.
Daj spor u pracy štodzionnaj, šeraj,
na lustu chlieba, na rodny kraj,
pavahu, silu i vielič viery,
u našu praŭdu, u pryšlasć — daj!
Daj uradlivasć žytniovym nivam,
učynkam našym pašli ŭmalot!
Zrabi mahutnaj, zrabi ščaslivaj
krainu našu i naš narod!


My God! Lord of the Worlds,
More sun and toddlers heart!
Over Belarus, a quiet and friendly,
scattering rays of his praise.
Give the dispute in the daily, gray,
on a slice of bread, on the native land,
respect, power and greatness of the faith,
our truth, in the future - give!
Give fertility wheat nivam,
our act went umolote!
Make powerful, to make happy
our country and our people!




Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 05:21:52 pm
I have posted up a piece by Mikola Szczahłou-Kulikowicz (1893-1969).

It is a song (with orchestra) called Pahonia.  The pahonia is a symbol of Belarus - it's a mounted horseman holding a sword.    It was  the coat of arms of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the Belarusian Democratic Republic in 1918 and of the Republic of Belarus from 1991 to 1995. Image here - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pahonia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pahonia)

From various sources, using google-translate:

Nikolai Shcheglov-Kulikovich (4 April 1893 Smolensk - March 31, 1969, Chicago, USA) - Belarusian composer, musicologist.

He was born in the Belarusian Smolensk. Early left an orphan, often staying with his aunt, who was abbess of the convent in Tver. There the boy began to sing in the choir, and quickly attracted the attention of teachers of the Moscow Synodal Music School, searching the province for capable musicians.

He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory.

Introduced in 1936 in Minsk, he was one of the organizers of the Opera House and conductors of  its symphony orchestra. He worked as editor of the Belarusian Radio. In 1940 to the Belarusian arts decade he wrote a cantata in Moscow called "Stalin".

By the beginning of World War II, he was already a famous composer. He left under German occupation.

In 1944 he headed the music department of the Belarusian cultural cohesion. In the libretto Natalia Arsenyev wrote two operas: a lyrical-romantic "Forest Lake" and the historical "Vseslav the Wizard" and the operetta "in warmer climes." With music in the Minsk Shcheglova Drama Theatre was staged the play "sink ringing" on the play and was preparing G.Gavptmana "Kalinouski" A.Mirovicha, which banned by German censorship.

He left for the West during the advance of the Soviet army. Emigration continues to serve its inspiring muse. In 1946 Belarus will organize a traveling variety theater, which toured with concerts all West Germany. At this time, it is creating the music for the Holy Liturgy. Living from 1950 in the US, he published five collections of folk with melyasu and own songs, including "Russia, our mother-country" and "In the thickets" on poems by Natalia Arsenyev, "Pursuit" Maxim Bogdanovich.

Personal archive is stored in the Belarusian Library named after Francis Skaryna in London.

Nikolai Shcheglov-Kulikovich (4 April 1893 [1], Smolensk - March 31, 1969, Chicago) - Belarusian composer, muzykolag, ethnographer, poet and activist of Belarusian movement in exile.

He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory. From 1936 he lived in Minsk, worked as a music teacher, was one of the organizers of the Theatre of Opera and Ballet, the conductor of its symphony orchestra, since 1939 has been conductor of the Symphony Orchestra of the All-Belarusian Radio Committee, music editor of the Belarusian Radio. In doing creative work in Minsk during the German occupation. In 1943 he published "Collection midsummer and reaping Belarusian songs." Since 1944 in exile in Germany since 1950 - in the United States (Chicago). In 1950 founded in New York, the Belarusian choir then led the Belarusian choruses in Cleveland and Chicago. He left a legacy of great music; was the author of operas, symphonies, vocal pieces, arrangements of folk songs.

Works:
Dance with me, Tuka. - New York, Schirmer, Kawson Gould Music Publisher, 1972. - 14 p [2].
Belarusian music = The Whiteruthenian Music: A Short History of the Belarusian musical art. Part One. - Nu York: BINII edition, 1953. - 63 [3].
Belarusian musical culture / Nikolai Shcheglov. - Berlin: [b. etc.], 1944. -. 32. - (People's Library, number 6).
Belarusian folk song / Nikolai Shcheglov // Belarusian folk culture: Essays. - Vatenshtet, 1946. - 44 p. - S. 31 - 34.
Byelorussian Soviet opera / Nikolai Kulikovich. - Munich: Institute for the Study of the USSR, 1957. - 126 p. - (Research and Materials Series 2, Issue 60..).
Belarusian song collection. - Cleveland: Publisher Association of Belarusian youth, 1960. - 228 p. [4]
Belarusian song collection. Vol. 1: Ritual Belarusian songs and games, Christmas, spring and Kupala. - Cleveland: issued by the Association of Belarusian Youth in America, 1954. - 72 p.
Belarusian song collection [5]. Vol. 5: patriotic Belarusian songs for choir. - Cleveland: Association of Belarusian Youth in America, 1955. - 71 p.
Belarusian folk instruments / Nikolai Shcheglov // Belarusian folk culture: Essays. - Vatenshtet, 1946. - 44 p. - S. 12 - 17.
Costumed: Byelorussian Christmas Songs. - Clevland: Byelorussian Youth Assn. in Cleveland, 1961. - 17 [6].
Costumed: Christmas and Christmas songs with games / Processing circle Orthodox youth and Belarusian Students' Association. - Bialystok, 1989. - 17 p.
My book dovish = Book of the Dove. - New York: Galaxy Music Corporation, 1964. - 5. - (A Heritage of Folk songs).
Midsummer scene. - Chicago, 1966. - 2 [7].
Native motifs: Byelorussian songs and dances for accordion. - Cleveland: Byelorussian Youth Ass'n in Cleveland, 1967. - 54 p.
Soviet opera in the service of the party and government / AN Kulikovich. - Munich: Institute for the study of the history and culture of the USSR, 1955. - 149 p. - (Series II Research and materials, number 30.).
In collaboration [edit | edit source]
Fatherland: Installation / Natalia Arsenyev, Nikolai Kulikovich. - [Mihelsdorf Belarusian gymnasium named after Yanka Kupala, 1947]. - 2 s.

Goldfinches / Kulikovich Nikolai

04.11.1897, Smolensk, according to other sources in 1896 and 04.04.1893, Moscow - 31.03.1969, Chicago (USA)], the Belarusian composer, musicologist, musician Belarusian historian and professor. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory. One of the organizers of the Minsk Opera House, conductor of his orchestra. Since 1936, he worked as an editor at the Belarusian Radio. In the early 1940s up to the Decade of Belarusian Art I wrote a cantata in Moscow "Stalin". In the years 1941 -1944 in Minsk he headed the department of the Belarusian cultural cohesion. Since the end of June 1944 in Germany, the head of the live band at the Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories. Since 1947 director and artistic director of the Belarusian theater stage. Since 1950 in the United States, living in New York, Cleveland and Chicago. Prints critical articles and essays in publications Institute for the Study of the USSR (Munich) and the Belarusian Institute of Science and Art (Chicago, USA). In 1953, in New York, published his book "The Belarusian musician: A Short History of the Belarusian musical art." Cleveland has issued several Belarusian dictionary edited them. The theme of the historical past of the Belarusian people is in the "Katerina" based on his opera (written in 1941, libretto Klimkovich), "Forest Lake" (staged in 1942), "Vseslav Wizard" (staged in 1943, both the libretto N.A.Arsennevay) . Author operetta "in warmer climes", symphonies, symphonic suites, concertos, songs and romances on the words of Yanka Kupala ( "I'm far away from you, the parent whip"), M. Bogdanovich ( "Chase"), U.Dubovki ( "Oh, Belarus my dog rose "). Author extremely lyrical music to the songs "vasilechkami", "Drinking song", "Cornflowers" in the words of the composer. The author of music to drama performances, works of church music, treatment of Belarusian folk songs. Compiled by "Belarusian song collections" (1954, 1955, 1960), collections of "Kolyadovschiki" (1961), "Native motives" (1967), theatrical works "Belarusian Song" (1942, unpublished), "Belarusian musical culture" (1944 ), "Belarusian Soviet opera" (1957). M.M.Shchaglova archive is stored in the Belarusian Library and Museum named after Francis Skorina (London), where the director is working Alexander Nadson (Barrel).


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 05:38:15 pm
I have posted up some extracts from two operas by Yauhen Tsikotsky (Tikotsky in Russian) - "Alesia, Maiden of Polesia" and "Mikhas Padgorny".

From various wikipedia, via google-translate:

Evgeny Karlovich Tikotsky (December 26, 1893, St. Petersburg - November 23, 1970) - Belarusian composer, People's Artist of the Byelorussian SSR (1953), People's Artist of the USSR (1955).

After demobilization in 1920 he lived in Bobruisk, since 1934 - in Minsk. He wrote the music for the Belarusian Radio, taught at the music school. After World War II Tikotsky led the Belarusian Philharmonic, then for 13 years as head of the Union of Composers of the BSSR. One of the founders of the Belarusian Opera and Symphony in Byelorussia. In the 1970s, when the city authorities destroyed the historic center of Minsk, E. Tikotsky was one of the most active defenders of the architectural heritage. Father of literary figure M.E. Tikotskogo.

In his honour is named a street in Minsk. He was a People's Artist of the Byelorussian SSR.


Evgeny Karlovich Tikotsky (Belarus Yaўgen Karlavіch Tsіkotskі; 1893-1970.) - Belarusian Soviet composer, and teacher. People's Artist of the USSR (1955).

Eugene Tikotsky born 14 (26) December 1893 (according to other sources - 13 (25) December 1893) in St. Petersburg in a noble family of Captain 1st rank (from 1899 Rear-Admiral, then vice-admiral retired) the commander of the cruiser "Africa" battleships "Hanko" and "Poltava", the first mayor of Nikolaev (1900-02), then commander of the Baltic fleet mine detachment Tikotskogo Karl Mikhailovich (1845-after 1917). Father of the composer played the cello and flute.

In 1911 he graduated from the Tsarskoye Selo real school of Emperor Nicholas II. He entered the natural separation of the Psychoneurological Institute in St. Petersburg, at the same time engaging in private musical courses.

Music education was limited to two years of private piano lessons and music theory at the C-Volkova Bonch-compositions studied independently. He began to compose at the age of 14 years, in consultation with his friend VM Deshevov, who studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory.

In 1915 he went to the front, a member of the 1st World War (1914-1918). In 1919-1924 he served in the Red Army. He participated in the liberation of Belarus from the White Poles.

After the service in 1924 remained in Bobruisk, where entirely devoted himself to music, educational and creative activities. Since 1927 he taught at the music school. The first major work - Symphony (1927), written with Belarusian folk and revolutionary fact became one of the first works in this genre in the history of Belarusian music.

Since 1934, lived in Minsk, he taught at the School of Music, the composer worked on the Belarusian Radio. During this period, he wrote the music for a number of theatrical productions in Minsk. In 1939 he wrote one of the most famous of his works - the opera "Mihas Padgorny" (one of the first operas in the history of Belarus), in 1943 - another well-known patriotic opera - "Alesya, Maiden of Polesia".

During the Great Patriotic War, was evacuated first in Ufa, then in Gorky.

On his return to Belarus Tikotsky he worked as the artistic director of the Belarusian State Philharmonic (1944-1951), taught at the music school ten-year.

Member of the SC of the USSR since 1932, with the same time - a board member of the UK BSSR. Since 1948 - Member of the Board of the USSR SC. In 1950-1963 years - the chairman of the board SC BSSR.

Member of the CPSU (b) since 1948. BC Deputy Byelorussian SSR 4-5-th convocation.

Died November 24 (according to other sources - 23 November), 1970. Buried in Minsk in the Eastern Cemetery.

Awards and titles
People's Artist of the Byelorussian SSR (1953)
People's Artist of the USSR (1955)
BSSR State Prize (1968)
Order of Lenin (1944)
Two Orders of Red Banner of Labor (1940, 1948)
Order "Badge of Honor" (1964)
Medals
Creativity:
One of the founders of the Belarusian composer school. His works, written in the classical and romantic way to experience strong influence of folk motifs. One of the first Belarusian composers of opera and symphony, played an important role in the development of the Belarusian musical culture of the XX century.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 05:55:42 pm
I have posted up a song by Konstanty Tyzenhaus (1785-1853) called "A Greeting Song for Tomasz Zan".  Tomasz Zan was a Polish poet and activist, and a co-founder of the Philomatic Association (1817), the Radiant Association (1820), and practitioner of the Filaret Association (1820-23) - all of them student organizations in Vilnius dedicated to Polish cultural and political activities. For his activity in those organizations he was exiled by the Russian authorities to Siberia (from 1824 to 1837). His poetry is mostly satirical, most known is the heroicomic 'Zgon tabakiery'.

Konstanty Tyzenhaus (1785-1853), ornithologist, artist, amateur musician. He was born in the small town of Zhaludok (nowin Shchuchyn district) and originated from a famous family, whose representatives held high positions in Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth). He was the author of numerous scientific works on ornithology, was interested in painting (and took lessons from Jan Rustem). In his estate in Pastave he established an ornithological museum, a painting gallery and a rich library. He enjoyed home music practice and, in 1842, he composed A Greeting Song for Tomasz Zan based on the verse by Gabrielle Gunther.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 06:01:47 pm
I have posted up a song by Anton Mikhaylavich Valynchyk (1896-1985) - "Old Lime Trees" ("Lipy Stariya") - a capella.

from wikipedia (via google-translate):

Anton Valynchyk (July 23, 1896, d Myalkanavichy, Slonim -. November 13, 1985, Grodno) - choral conductor, composer, teacher, teacher Navahrudak Belarusian gymnasium.

He embodies the concert program includes works by J. Bach, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Schubert, Moniuszko, K. Weber. Processed Belarusian folk songs. He wrote and prepared to perform their songs and choruses on words of Yanka Kupala, Yakub Kolas, Adam Rusak, Petrus Brovki and other Belarusian poets. Practised in the choir performance in "a cappella" style [1].

Biography
Born into a family of church regent. After Zhirovichi seminary was drafted into the army, where 19-year-old boy led a soldier's chorus. After the army he returned to his homeland and in the period from 1939 to 1947. He worked as a teacher of music and singing in a real school in Luninets, then in Kletsk Belarusian gymnasium, then in Navahrudak Belarusian gymnasium, as well as the Belarusian teachers' seminary in Slonim. In 1937, Anton graduated from the Higher Valynchyk music courses at the Warsaw Conservatory of Music Kremenets Lyceum. During the Second World War he lived in Slonim, where he led various choirs.

After the war, he was artistic director of the Belarusian inter-provincial song and dance ensemble in Ashmyany. To avoid reprisals, he collaborated with the choirs of Orthodox churches in Kletsk, Novogrudok, Slonim, Zhirovitsy and Minsk. In 1956 the composer went to Mogilev region, where the leader of the choir got the Belarusian Agricultural Academy in Gorki. A year later he returned to Molodechno, where he became head of the inter-provincial Molodechno Song and Dance Ensemble, who led four years. In 1961 he moved to Grodno. There he headed the department of music and singing of the Grodno Pedagogical Institute, he worked as choirmaster at the same time the national Grodno "Neman" Song and Dance Ensemble (from the leadership of which was subsequently removed the Soviet nomenklatura) and artistic director of Grodno Folk Choir teachers. She advised as a choirmaster many Choir Grodno. Died November 13, 1985. He was buried in the town cemetery Grodno. On his grave there is a monument, delivered a simple iron cross. 


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 17, 2016, 06:26:32 pm
I have posted up some pieces by Vasil Zalatarou (Vasilii Zolotarev in Russian) - 1872-1964.

Rondo capricciso - possibly this piece is actually by Vladislav Zolotarev who was a composer for the bayan (a kind of accordion) - and this is clearly a bayan piece!
Pushkin's letter to the Decembrists from opera "The Decembrists"
Capriccio on Hebrew Melodies

Zolotarev's original surname was Kuyumzhi (Куюмжи).

from wikipedia:

Vasily Andreyevich Zolotarev, also romanized as Zolotaryov (Russian: Василий Андреевич Золотарёв; February 24, 1872 in Taganrog – May 25, 1964 in Moscow), was a Russian (Soviet) composer, music teacher, and People's Artist of Russia.

Vasily Zolotarev was born in the city of Taganrog in 1872. Studied music at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory under direction of Mily Balakirev (1893–1898) in the class of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1898–1900), graduating in 1900. Zolotarev lectured at Moscow Conservatory (1909–1918), at the Belarus State Academy of Music (Белорусская государственная консерватория им. А. В. Луначарского) in 1933–1941, and other conservatories. Among his students in Tashkent was Mieczysław Weinberg.[2]

Vasily Zolotarev is author of three operas, seven symphonies (1902–1962), three concerti, six string quartets, songs and other works.

Rhapsodie hébraïque
The New York Times wrote of Zolotarev's Rhapsodie hébraïque that it was "based on Hebrew melodies now used in Russia… among the Jewish families of the lower classes. … [Zolotarev] found that upon a Hebrew racial idiom there had been grafted some of the characteristic of Russian music just as the irreducible language of the Jews in any country is overlaid by a few words or modes of expression belonging to the land of their environment. Thus the melodies… are the musical equivalent of Yiddish." They described the melodies as "built upon an Oriental scale… [whose] earmark is an augmented interval instead of that found in the diatonic scale between the third and fourth notes.

Selected works
Stage
Decembrists (Декабристы), Opera (1925); new edition Kondrati Ryleev, 1957
Prince Lake (Князь-озеро), Ballet (1949); won the Stalin Prize in 1950
Orchestral
Fête villageoise (Деревенский праздник; Village Festival), Overture in F major, Op. 4 (1901)
Rhapsodie hébraïque (Еврейская рапсодия), Op. 7 (1903)
Symphony No. 1, Op. 8 (1903)
Ouverture-fantaisie, Op. 22 (1907)
Concertante
Concerto for cello and orchestra (1963)
Chamber music
Suite in the Form of Variations (Сюита в форме вариаций) for violin and piano, Op. 2 (1900)
String Quartet No. 1, Op. 5 (1901)
String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 6 (1902)
2 Novelettes for violin and piano, Op. 11 (1904)
Piano Quartet in D minor, Op. 13 (1905)
String Quintet in F minor for 2 violins, viola and 2 cellos, Op. 19 (1905)
String Quartet No. 3 in D major, Op. 25 (1908)
Trio for violin, viola and piano, Op. 28 (1910)
String Quartet No. 4 in B♭ major, Op. 33 (1913)
Eclogue (Эклога) for viola and piano, Op. 38 (1923)
Sonata for violin and piano, Op. 40 (1925)
String Quartet No. 5 in G major, Op. 46 (1930)
Capriccio on a Hebrew Melody (Каприччио на еврейскую мелодию) for violin and piano (1938)
Trio for violin, cello and piano (1953)
String Quartet No. 6 "on Russian Folk Themes" (на русские народные темы) (1959)
Poème (Поэма) for cello and piano (1962)
Piano
Sonata [No. 1], Op. 10 (1904)
Trois Préludes (Три прелюдии) Op. 18 (1905)
Ukrainian Songs (Украинские песни), 30 Short Pieces for piano 4-hands, Op. 15 (1925)
Sonata No. 2, Op. 42 (1927)
4 Pieces (Четыре пьесы), Op. 43 (1929)
Trois récits (Три рассказа), Op. 44 (1926)
Choral
Paradise and the Peri (Рай и Пери), Cantata (1900); awarded the Rubinstein Prize
Vocal
4 Songs (Четыре романса) for high voice and piano, Op. 1 (1900)
4 Songs (Четыре романса) for voice and piano, Op. 16 (1904)
6 Songs (Шесть романсов) for low voice and piano, Op. 17 (1905)
Literary
Fugue: A Guide to the Practical Study (Фуга: руководство к практическому изучению), Moscow 1956
Memories of My Great Teachers, Friends and Comrades (Воспоминания о моих великих учителях, друзьях и товарищах), Мoscow 1957
Awards[edit]
1932 – Honored Artist of RSFSR
1949 – Peoples' Artist of Belorussian SSR
1950 – Stalin Prize



Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: Gauk on August 17, 2016, 10:31:36 pm
That's an impressive bit of posting! Many thanks!


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 18, 2016, 12:06:49 pm
That's an impressive bit of posting! Many thanks!

Not at all.  Do let us know what you think of the music.  Personally I find some of it a bit too folk-ish.  For example the Aladau overture.  But I posted them up anyway as others might like. 

I am still on the hunt for my "Holy Grail" as far as Belarusian classical music is concerned - recordings of many of Vasil Zolotarev's symphonic works which were allegedly made in the Soviet era, and a box set of Yauhen Tsikotski's music (or Evgeny Tikotsky) which reportedly includes much of his symphonic output.  If anyone has any knowledge of these, please share!


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: rkhenderson on August 18, 2016, 05:39:59 pm
Thanks very much for those uploads. I enjoyed the extra glimpses of works by Aladov, especially the scherzo of the 9th symphony which joins up with the other pieces posted by him. How were you able to obtain these - Belarus libraries? No chance of the Zolotarev and Tikotsky symphonies from the same source? I don't give up hope of the Abeliovich symphonies 1 and 4 either!

Robert


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: BrianA on August 19, 2016, 12:19:46 am
What Robert said.  I too am desperately seeking Abeliovich 1 & 4.

Brian


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on August 19, 2016, 11:25:03 am
Thanks very much for those uploads. I enjoyed the extra glimpses of works by Aladov, especially the scherzo of the 9th symphony which joins up with the other pieces posted by him. How were you able to obtain these - Belarus libraries? No chance of the Zolotarev and Tikotsky symphonies from the same source? I don't give up hope of the Abeliovich symphonies 1 and 4 either!

Robert


A friend of a friend is a student in Minsk and frequently uses the National Library, so she very kindly did a bit of digging for me.  But she says they don't have any Zolotarev or Tikotsky beyond what I have posted.

Are you confident that the Abeliovich symphonies 1 and 4 have definitely been recorded?


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on August 21, 2016, 04:41:15 am
did anyone catch that radio broadcast of Aladov's Sym no 7??    it was the Symphony Orchestra of the National Television and Radio Company of Belarus or aka  Belarus RTV SO



Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on August 21, 2016, 04:46:36 pm
What Robert said.  I too am desperately seeking Abeliovich 1 & 4.

Brian

those were both radio broadcasts......BRTVSO


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on August 21, 2016, 10:51:17 pm
I have posted up some pieces by Vasil Zalatarou (Vasilii Zolotarev in Russian) - 1872-1964.

Rondo capricciso - possibly this piece is actually by Vladislav Zolotarev who was a composer for the bayan (a kind of accordion) - and this is clearly a bayan piece!
Pushkin's letter to the Decembrists from opera "The Decembrists"
Capriccio on Hebrew Melodies

Zolotarev's original surname was Kuyumzhi (Куюмжи).

from wikipedia:

Vasily Andreyevich Zolotarev, also romanized as Zolotaryov (Russian: Василий Андреевич Золотарёв; February 24, 1872 in Taganrog – May 25, 1964 in Moscow), was a Russian (Soviet) composer, music teacher, and People's Artist of Russia.

Vasily Zolotarev was born in the city of Taganrog in 1872. Studied music at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory under direction of Mily Balakirev (1893–1898) in the class of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1898–1900), graduating in 1900. Zolotarev lectured at Moscow Conservatory (1909–1918), at the Belarus State Academy of Music (Белорусская государственная консерватория им. А. В. Луначарского) in 1933–1941, and other conservatories. Among his students in Tashkent was Mieczysław Weinberg.[2]

Vasily Zolotarev is author of three operas, seven symphonies (1902–1962), three concerti, six string quartets, songs and other works.

Rhapsodie hébraïque
The New York Times wrote of Zolotarev's Rhapsodie hébraïque that it was "based on Hebrew melodies now used in Russia… among the Jewish families of the lower classes. … [Zolotarev] found that upon a Hebrew racial idiom there had been grafted some of the characteristic of Russian music just as the irreducible language of the Jews in any country is overlaid by a few words or modes of expression belonging to the land of their environment. Thus the melodies… are the musical equivalent of Yiddish." They described the melodies as "built upon an Oriental scale… [whose] earmark is an augmented interval instead of that found in the diatonic scale between the third and fourth notes.



The article about the Hebrew Rhapsody was performed by the Russian Symphony Orchestra of NYC under the direction of Modest Altschuler.  The RSO of NYC, recorded many pieces on the Columbia record label before they disbanded in 1922.    See wiki:



Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: rkhenderson on April 01, 2017, 08:27:01 pm
Thanks Christopher for the contributions to the Belarusian downloads. I finally get to hear some orchestral music
by Vassily Zolotarev, whose symphonies we have so long hoped to hear.  Does anyone know from which date this ballet is?
The music is effective if a little unsubtle (lots of activity and drama) and seems to have Soviet overtones rather than the Russian
romantics that I had hoped to hear.
Belarus is still a source of some of my favourite forgotten composers (Vagner, Abeliovich, Tikotsky, Aladov) so I still long for more works from their pen turning up!


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on April 03, 2017, 12:40:48 am
Belarusian Philharmonic concerts are finally appearing on BRTV.  Beethoven Sym no 2 was the other night.  https://www.kvitki.by/en/filter/46/49

hopefully, we will see the Tikotsky symphonies soon and Abeliovich's 4th


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on April 03, 2017, 10:59:16 am
Thanks Christopher for the contributions to the Belarusian downloads. I finally get to hear some orchestral music
by Vassily Zolotarev, whose symphonies we have so long hoped to hear.  Does anyone know from which date this ballet is?
The music is effective if a little unsubtle (lots of activity and drama) and seems to have Soviet overtones rather than the Russian
romantics that I had hoped to hear.
Belarus is still a source of some of my favourite forgotten composers (Vagner, Abeliovich, Tikotsky, Aladov) so I still long for more works from their pen turning up!

I hope to be receving more in due course, and will post accordingly.  Which works of the composers you mention do you have?  I am trying to ascertain what has even been recorded.

And in relations to that youtube link, the clip of the Zolotarev ballet, and of the Tikotsky opera, look like they are excerpts from films.  Which makes me wonder if there are complete recordings of each.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: rkhenderson on April 05, 2017, 08:08:30 pm
Vagner Concertino for Piano and Chamber Ensemble (1952)   
Vagner Suite for Orchestra in A minor (1957)
Vagner Ballet "A Shell Bride" (1958)
Vagner Symphonic Poem for Orchestra and Female Chorus without Words "Live Forever" (1959)   
Vagner Suite from the Ballet "Light and Dark" (1963)   
Vagner Piano Concerto No. 1 in A minor (1965)
Vagner Ballet Suite "After the Ball" (1967)   
Vagner Symphony No. 1 in E minor (1970)
Vagner "To the Heroes of the Brest Forest", a Vocal Symphony (1975)   
Vagner Clarinet Concerto in B major (1982)   

Tikotsky "The Song of the Stormy Petrel" Heroic Poem after Maxim Gorky (1920)   
Tikotsky Symphony No. 3 in E flat, Op. 36 (1948)
Tikotsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 50 (1955)
Tikotsky Symphony No. 6 in A major, Op. 65 (1963)
Tikotsky Lyavonikha (a Belarusian dance) for Orchestra      

Abeliovich Piano Sonata No. 1 (1953)
Abeliovich Piano Trio (1955)
Abeliovich Piano Sonata No. 2 (1957)
Abeliovich Symphony No. 2 in E minor (1964)
Abeliovich Symphony No. 3 in B minor (1967)
Abeliovich "Frescoes" for Piano, Book 2 (1972)
Abeliovich Aria for Viola and Piano (1973)   
Abeliovich Aria for Violin and Orchestra (1973)      
Abeliovich Piano Sonata No. 3 (1973)
Abeliovich Vocalise in Memory of D. Shostakovich (1976)   
Abeliovich Piano Concerto (1978)
Abeliovich 5 pieces for piano (1979)
Abeliovich Ten Romances on Poems by Fyodor Tyutchev (1983)


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on April 05, 2017, 08:23:32 pm
Several of those are in the downloads section under Belarusian Music


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on April 26, 2017, 02:45:42 pm
I have posted a piece in the downloads section which my source in Minsk believes is the first movement of the first symphony by Yauhen Tsikotski (1893-1970, Evgeny Tikotsky in Russian). However she is not 100% sure.

If anyone is able to confirm (or refute) this it would be much appreciated! It sounds like it's from a 78.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: Holger on April 26, 2017, 05:46:35 pm
I have posted a piece in the downloads section which my source in Minsk believes is the first movement of the first symphony by Yauhen Tsikotski (1893-1970, Evgeny Tikotsky in Russian). However she is not 100% sure.

If anyone is able to confirm (or refute) this it would be much appreciated! It sounds like it's from a 78.

I have just checked the piece. However, it is in fact the first movement of Tsikotski's Fourth Symphony (of which we have a copy somewhere in our Downloads).


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on April 27, 2017, 04:23:24 pm
I have posted a piece in the downloads section which my source in Minsk believes is the first movement of the first symphony by Yauhen Tsikotski (1893-1970, Evgeny Tikotsky in Russian). However she is not 100% sure.

If anyone is able to confirm (or refute) this it would be much appreciated! It sounds like it's from a 78.

I have just checked the piece. However, it is in fact the first movement of Tsikotski's Fourth Symphony (of which we have a copy somewhere in our Downloads).

Thanks for this Holger.  I will remove!


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on October 09, 2017, 11:49:19 am
I have posted (in both the Belarusian and Polish sections) up some piano music and songs by the Belarusian/Polish composer Yan Tarasevich (also spelt Jan Tarasiewicz).  The below is google-translated from his Belarusian-language Wikipedia page:

Yan Tarasevich (Polish: Jan Tarasiewicz; September 23, 1893, Sokolka now Podlasie, Poland - June 18, 1961..) - Polish and Belarusian composer, pianist and teacher.

He received his musical education in St. Petersburg. He participated in the creation of the Belarusian People's Republic. He worked in the Belarusian school in Grodno. Then he lived mainly in Sakolshchyne.
He wrote music for piano, choral and desktop, as well as songs. Inspired by Belarusian folklore. He left behind 113 compositions and one unfinished concerto.
In 2013, in Bialystok took took place the Yan Tarasevich Festival, dedicated to the music of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.


https://be.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ян_Тарасевіч (https://be.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ян_Тарасевіч)

(https://zbsb.org/upload/sites/default/files/content/M_images/Polszcza/tarasievicz_j.jpg)

(http://referatdb.ru/pars_docs/refs/185/184856/184856_html_m72e234ff.png)






Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: christopher on October 09, 2017, 11:50:02 am
More on Tarasevich/Tarasiewicz:

from a Russian-language essay on Belarusian composers (google-translated):  http://elib.bspu.by/bitstream/doc/2769/1/1.%20Ян%20Тарасевич,%20Евгений%20Карлович%20Тикоцкий,%20Николай%20Щеглов-Куликович,%20Григорий%20Константинович%20Пукст.pdf (http://elib.bspu.by/bitstream/doc/2769/1/1.%20Ян%20Тарасевич,%20Евгений%20Карлович%20Тикоцкий,%20Николай%20Щеглов-Куликович,%20Григорий%20Константинович%20Пукст.pdf)

Yan Tarasevich (23/10/1893 - 06/18/1961), composer, pianist and teacher. He was born in the county town of Sokolka in Grodno province (now Sokółka, Podlasie, Poland). The father of the future composer was a Lieutenant colonel and a hero of the Russian-Turkish war. His parents died when he was seven years old, and he was taken into the care of his mother's second cousin. On the estate of this aunt the boy had a governess, who gave him his first knowledge in musical literacy and taught him to play the piano.

Jan loved to play music, but, like most children of aristocratic family, he prepared another for another destiny. The boy was sent to study at the St. Petersburg Cadet Corps. However, his love for music was stronger. Immediately after graduating he entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory.

Jan's musical talent manifested itself at the conservatory. His talent was noticed by the outstanding composer A. Glazunov, with whose help the first works of the young composer were published. Yan Tarasevich enjoyed great popularity as a brilliant performer. His abilities were noted by the leading musical lights of the time - Sergei Rahmaninov and Jean Sibelius. Tarasevich was presented at the court of the Russian Emperor, where he performed in concerts. The Tsar's daughter Maria was a fan.

But his success and promising future were interrupted by the October Revolution of 1917. The composer taught for some time at the Grodno Belarusian school. He was also involved in the creation of the short-lived independent Belarusian People's Republic in 1918. But after the establishment of Soviet power, he returned to the estate near Sokółka and completely gave himself to composing. In 1921, as a result of the Brest Treaty, Sokolka - being only a few kilometers from the border with Belarus, was included as part of Poland. Yan Tarasevich found himself outside his homeland. For many years he lived immovably on his estate. According to the recollections of local residents, the composer paid little attention to the farm, giving all his time to music. Many of his works are inspired by the atmosphere that prevailed around the estate. He felt the friendly disposition of local residents. In gratitude, the composer dedicated his "Banal Waltz" to them.

In 1939, after the arrival of Soviet troops, Tarasevich left his estate and travelled to Latvia, to wait out the "hard times." With the advent of Soviet power Tarasevich's estate  was nationalized, and all the land distributed to local peasants. When he returned to his home in 1942, he found it destroyed.

Having survived the war, in 1947 Tarasevich moved to Białystok to a small wooden house, consisting of a kitchen and one room in which the piano and bed could barely fit. Tarasevich lived in this house for fourteen years,  earning his living by giving private music lessons. Many of his students later became well-known musicians. The composer died in 1961, and  was buried in a cemetery in Sokółka, according to the terms of his will.

Living on the territory of Poland, Jan Tarasevicc did not lost his connection to  Belarusian culture. The root of many of his creations was the Belarusian folk music, and his vocal works were based on poems by Belarusian poets.  Tarasevich left behind 110 works of various genres. These include works for piano, choir, chamber and instrumental works, songs and romances, and one unfinished Piano Concerto.

Neither in life or after his death was Tarasevich's work recognised by Polish composers. A revival of interest in his music began only after the broadcast of the musical heritage of the composers of Belarus in 1997. In 2000, at the initiative of "Belarusian Capella" in Warsaw a CD was released, which includes 24 vocal and piano works of the composer, performed by artists of the Belarusian State Philharmonic Society and the National Academic Bolshoi Opera and Ballet Theater of Belarus.

In 2001, a book was published in Minsk by the singer Viktor Skorobogatov called "Without glory: the composer Yan Tarasevich". In mid-2007, Białystok TV recorded a documentary film "The Forgotten composer - Yan Tarasevich."

In 2011, a plaque was unveiled in Sokółka in memory of Jan Tarasevich.

In 2013 in Białystok, the Yan Tarasevich Festival took place, dedicated to the music of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on October 09, 2017, 03:37:30 pm
Thanks for posting this... learned something new.


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: Corentin Boissier on May 06, 2018, 01:03:08 pm
CAUTION: Concerning the files uploaded by "dhibbard" on May 14, 2013, of Lev Abeliovich's Symphony No. 2 (1964) and Genrikh Vagner's Suite for Symphony Orchestra (1957), the last movement of the symphony is missing in the Symphony file, and it appears at the beginning of the file entitled Vagner's Suite for orchestra, before the actual Suite, which is in four parts and consitutes the remaining 18 minutes of the file. In other words, the last movement of Abeliovich's symphony constitues the first 8 minutes of the Suite file, such as uploaded.
By the way, the movements of Abeliovich's second symphony are : 1. Andantino - Allegro ; 2. Allegro ; 3. Adagio ; 4. Vivace
I take the opportunity to thank "dhibbard" for all his precious uploads of Belarusian music...


Title: Re: Belarusian Music
Post by: dhibbard on May 07, 2018, 01:23:12 am
CAUTION: Concerning the files uploaded by "dhibbard" on May 14, 2013, of Lev Abeliovich's Symphony No. 2 (1964) and Genrikh Vagner's Suite for Symphony Orchestra (1957), the last movement of the symphony is missing in the Symphony file, and it appears at the beginning of the file entitled Vagner's Suite for orchestra, before the actual Suite, which is in four parts and consitutes the remaining 18 minutes of the file. In other words, the last movement of Abeliovich's symphony constitues the first 8 minutes of the Suite file, such as uploaded.
By the way, the movements of Abeliovich's second symphony are : 1. Andantino - Allegro ; 2. Allegro ; 3. Adagio ; 4. Vivace
I take the opportunity to thank "dhibbard" for all his precious uploads of Belarusian music...

Thank you for your kind words.   I know that I probably didn't man the recorder as well as I should have and let the next piece get picked up by the recording. I still have the LPs in my library and perhaps later this year,  I can go back and recreate the Mediafire files.  I was wanting to get those up into Mediafire since I had a block of time off from work.   I still pay the quarterly fee to keep the Mediafire files active and plan on that for several years.   I think its important to put these files out there for interested people to listen to these rare recordings.   I've even had some Music Phd studenst thank me to the uploads as they can't be found.    Thanks again for your note. 
Dave