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Israeli music


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jowcol
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« on: September 10, 2012, 06:33:44 pm »



Paul Ben-Haim: Cello Concerto (1962)


Raphael Summer, Cello
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Gary Bertini, Conductor
Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown


From the collection of Karl Miller

http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?325tabki7zcc25k

Paul Ben-Haim, although born in Germany, would need to be considered Israeli, if you look at his bio from wikipedia below.


Wikipedia Bio
Paul Ben-Haim (or Paul Ben-Chaim, Hebrew: פאול בן חיים‎) (July 5, 1897 – January 14, 1984) was an Israeli composer. Born Paul Frankenburger in Munich, Germany, he studied composition with Friedrich Klose and he was assistant conductor to Bruno Walter and Hans Knappertsbusch from 1920 to 1924. He served as conductor at Augsburg from 1924 to 1931, and afterwards devoted himself to teaching and composition, including teaching at the Shulamit Conservatory.

Ben-Haim emigrated to the then British Mandate of Palestine in 1933 and lived in Judea, in an area to the east of Jerusalem. He Hebraized his name, becoming an Israeli citizen upon that nation's independence in 1948. He composed chamber music, works for choir, orchestra and solo instruments, and songs. He championed a specifically Jewish national music: his own compositions are in a late Romantic vein with Middle Eastern overtones, somewhat similar to Ernest Bloch.

His notable students include Eliahu Inbal, Henri Lazarof, Ben-Zion Orgad, Ami Maayani, Shulamit Ran, Rami Bar-Niv, Avraham Sternklar and Noam Sheriff.


 
 





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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2013, 12:26:38 pm »


  Tzvi Avni (1927- ) : Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (2010)

  http://www.mediafire.com/?xz89ezmscn5aj5e

  Heidrun Holtmann, piano
  Daniel Raiskin / Jenaer Philharmonie

  (Live) 9.January.2013, Volkshaus Jena / MDR Figaro broadcast at 25.January.2013



  One more work by same composer

  Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet

  http://www.mediafire.com/?504yro5qe5ybm7y
 
  Johannes Gmeinder, Klarinette / Mandelring Quartett

  (Live) 16. Dezember. 2012 in der Hochschule fur Musik Saar / SR 2 KulturRadio broadcast at 23.January.2013
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jowcol
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2013, 06:36:56 pm »

Music of Paul Ben-Haim

 
From the collection of Karl Miller, with a few additions.


Volume 1
1-4: From Israel (Suite for Orchestra)
Denver Symphony Orchestra
Saul Caston, Con.
Mar 11, 1958

Note:  The Stokowski version  of the Suite has  5 movements.
1. Prologue
2. Song of Songs
3. Yemenite Melody
4. Siesta
5. Celebration



5: Evocation - Concerto for Violin
Shimon Mishori
Radio Orchestra of Israel
Shalom Ronli-Riklis, Cont.

6. Pastorale Variee for Clarinet, Harp and Strings

Op. 31
James Livingston, Clarinet
Louisville Orchestra
Robert Whitney, Cond.
LP Source: LOU 626  Released 1967

7.  Dance and Invocation
“Breslau Symphony Orch; Artur Rosenthal, Cond. “
Probably Israel Philharmonic , Istvan Kertesz, Cond.
LP Source: Aires 1613
 


8.  “To the Chief  Musician”, Metamorphoses for Orchestra
Robert Whitney, Cond.
Louisville Orchestra
LP Source:  LOU 601

9-11:  Symphony # 1
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Kenneth Alwyn, Cond.
LP Source”: CBS S 72629

12-13:  Intro, Cappriccio for Piano and Orchestra
Pnina Saltzman, pf.
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra
Carlo Maria Giulini, cond.
Dec 12, 1960


14: Rhapsody for Piano and Strings
Soloist unknown
Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra
Etlinger(?) Cond.

15-17:  Piano Concerto
Amiram Rigai, Piano
Haifa SO
Haifa Symphony Orchestra ; [Winston] Dan Vogel, conductor.

All tracks from the collection of Karl Miller
Sources are Radio broadcasts, LPs, or personal recordings.
None of these, to my knowledge, have been commercially released.

http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?c7tv9l8687g8hw9


Volume 2:


18-21  Cello Concerto (1962)
Raphael Summer, Cello
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Gary Bertini, Conductor
Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown

Note-- this is from the Karl Miller collection as well, and I've already posted it to several forums.   I figured I would re-include it in this release so that  we would have a better collection.

The remainder of these audio tracks come from non-commercial postings of performances on Youtube.  I've offered what information I can.

22: Three Songs without Words
Flutist Jonathan Brahms and harpist Cynthia Price, the Da Camera Duo, perform Three Songs Without Words by Paul Ben-Haim (1897 - 1984) in a live concert at the MIT Chapel on January 13, 1983.

1. Arioso - Molto moderato
2. Ballade - Allegretto
3. Sephardic Song - Largamente, rubato e molto appasionato


Posted on YouTube by Jonathon Brahms

23  Improvisation and Dance:
Diego Gabete Violín
Yunhee Choi Piano
St Gabriel's, Pimlico
london, UK
Posted on Youtube by kikalis100

24. Fanfare for Israel
Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Amos Talmon
May 2008
Posted on Youtube by: Amos


25.  Music for  Cello 3

Paul Ben-Haim, MUSIC FOR CELLO No. 3

Live recorded in concert, 19.02.2011

FIONA POLLAK, Orgel
MICHAEL CROITORU-WEISSMAN, Cello

Posted on Youtube by MICHAEL CROITORU-WEISSMAN

26: 3 songs without Words
On the Sax, - ANDRE TSIRLIN
Posted on Youtube  by Shali Boharon
Other details in Hebrew…

http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?6n0mpmxow5lkdcx
.
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« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2015, 09:19:41 pm »

Music of Menachem Avidom


Menahem Avidom presenting Albert Einstein a copy of his symphony no. 2 "David" during a tour of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra to the U.S.A, around 1949


From the collection of Karl Miller
http://www.mediafire.com/download/f33fa4exntca8z4/Avidom.zip

Symphony No. 1: "A Folk Symphony"
Kol Israel Orchestra
Heinz Freudenthal, Conductor
Radio broadcast, date unknown


Symphony No. 5: "The Song of Eilat"
(Signal loss at beginning)
Soprano, unidentified
Kol Israel Orchestra
George Singer, Conductor
[Broadcast 25 February 1962]



Bio from National Library of Israel:
Menahem Avidom
 Menahem Avidom, born 6 January 1908 (as Mahler-Kalkstein) in Stanislav, Russia (then Hungary), died 5 August 1995 in Tel Aviv, Israel.

Israeli Composer. His mother was a cousin of Gustav Mahler. He studied at the American University in Beirut and at the Paris Conservatoire where his teachers included the composer Henri Rabaud. In 1925 Avidom immigrated to Palestine where he taught at the Music Teacher Training College in Tel Aviv and at the Tel Aviv Conservatory. Avidom was also a music critic, general secretary of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (1946-52), adviser on the arts to the Ministry of Tourism (1952-55), chair of the Israel Composers’ League (1958-71) and general director of ACUM, the Israeli Performing Rights Society (1955-80). Avidom composed orchestral, chamber and piano music, operas and songs. After writing in an impressionist style he turned towards atonal composition. While studying in Beirut and during a four-year stay in Egypt, however, he became deeply influenced by Mediterranean and Asian folk music and French culture. These influences found their expression in arrangements for the Yemenite singer Bracha Zefira (1939). In the early 1960s Avidom was Influenced by the international trends and turned to 12- tones technique.

 
Among his works:
· Concerto for Flute and string (1944)
· Symphny No. 1 Symphonie Populair (1945)
· Concertino for violin and piano (1949)
· Symphony No. 3 Mediterranean Sinfonietta (1952)
· The Opera Alexandra ha'khashmonait (Alexandra the Hasmonean) (1955–6)
· Enigma Woodwind Quintet, piano and percussion (1962)
· ArtHur ruBinStEin six inventions for piano, hommage to the pianist (1974)
· Symphony no.10 Sinfonia Brevis (1981)
 
Avidom won the Israel Prize (1961), Engel Prize (1947), The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra Prize (1951) and ACUM Prize (1962).

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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2015, 12:43:12 pm »

Sholomo Yoffe Symphony No. 2


From the collection of Karl Miller

http://www.mediafire.com/download/27trh1e9h1vb7ir/yoffe.zip


Symphony No. 2
Israeli Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra
Heinz Freudenthal


Bio from the Israeli Composer's League

Shlomo Yoffe [Joffe], born in Warsaw, 19 May 1909.
In his youth he studied piano, theory and solfege in Samara, Russia (1918-21), and, in 1924 in Warsaw joined the Zionist movement Hashomer Hatza'ir, playing the mandoline, tuba, baritone and clarinet in its folk orchestras. He graduated from the Teachers' Seminarium in Poznan (Poland) in 1928, and in 1930, following agricultural studies in Brno (Czechoslovakia), moved to Palestine, helping to establish a kibbutz in 1932. Only after 1940 did he begin to be involved with music again, at first teaching and arranging music at the kibbutz Beit Alpha.

After a period of concentrated study (1947-53), with Prof. J. Tal and Prof. O. Partos at the New Jerusalem Academy of Music, and privately with A.A. Boskovich, he devoted himselfto composition and teaching at the district conservatory for kibbutzim at Beth-She'an Valley, where he was director until 1973. In the 1950s, under Boskovitch's influence, he used elements of Near Eastern Jewish song, maqam, heterophony and a form of chromatic modality, often in the expression of biblical and Israeli dramas, for example in the cantata "Tales of Mount Gilboa" (953), but also in his Prokofiev-like neo-classical symphonic works. These features remained evident in later works, despite the influence of Schoenbrg in the compositions of the 1960s and the influences that followed a visit to Darmstadt in 1962 and meetings with Lutoslawski and Penderecki. His cantata "Rising Night after Night" (1978), for example, exhibits many contemporary aspects, including extended vocal techniques, clusters and a deformed folk melody, but despite these developments, Joffe always remained, through his teaching, association and biblical roots, a 'kibbutz composer'.

Shlomo Yoffe died in Beit-Alpha, 29 Dec 1995.
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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2015, 12:44:27 pm »

Franz Crzellitzer: Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra

from the collection of Karl Miller

http://www.mediafire.com/download/5gd6z77c074y4ci/crzellitzer.zip

Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra
Yair Kless, violin
Israeli Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra
Bracha(?) Zisser, conductor

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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2015, 12:47:25 pm »

Abel Ehrlich: Village Girl- Ballet Music


From the collection of Karl Miller

http://www.mediafire.com/download/i8eoy27w2gs9h1c/elrich.zip

Village Girl- Ballet Music
Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra
Budmer(?) conductor


Bio from the Israeli Composer's League

Abel Ehrlich was born in Cranz, East Prussia, in 1915. He studied violin and began composing as a child. In 1934 he fled from Nazi Germany to Yugoslavia and pursued music studies in Zagreb. As a jew, he was forced to leave Yugoslavia and immigrated to Israel after a short stay in Albania. In Israel he continued his studies at the Eretz-Israel Conservatory in Jerusalem - his violin teachers were Emil Hauser and Tzvi Rothenberg and his composition teacher was Prof. Shlomo Rosovsky.
His educational activities include teaching at various institutes such as the Israel Conservatory, the Rubin Academy of Music and Dance, Jerusalem; the Rubin Academy of Music, Tel Aviv; Bar-Ilan University and the Oranim College.

His interest in Arab and Eastern Music and later, after attending the Darmstadt Summer Courses, in adapting serial methods in his own way, did not force national or folkloric disguise. The simplicity and directness in the way he presents his ideas shows his respect for the act of creation and requires a careful listening.

Ehrlich was awarded the ACUM Prize (8 times), the Liberson Prize (3 times) and the Prime Minister’s Prize for Israeli Composers. In 1972 was awarded a prize of the Alte Kirche Foundation, Boswil, Switzerland, for his work ARPMUSIC. Abel Ehrlich was, in 1997, recepient of the Israel Prize for Music.
Abel Ehrlich died in Tel Aviv on October 30th, 2003.
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« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2015, 12:50:13 pm »

Josef Kaminski- Violin Concerto (1949)


from the collection of Karl Miller


http://www.mediafire.com/download/ic1shz1mgc8j266/kaminski.zip

Violin Concerto
Alexander Tal, violin
Kol Israel Orchestra
Mendi Rohan, conductor



Bio from IMI:

Josef Kaminski was born in 1903, and soon afterwards moved with his family to Warsaw. His musical talent was apparent from childhood. In 1909, when he was six years old, he began to play the violin. In 1921, at the age of 12, the child prodigy performed as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra. His rendition of Max Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy won him critical. During this period he became interested in the piano, began studied piano as a composition tool, and began to compose music. In 1922 he moved to Berlin in order to study violin and composition at the Hochschule fr Music. He befriended the renowned conductor and composer, Paul Kletzky, and dedicated him and to the Israel PO his Israel Sketches , a piece that will be preformed by the orchestra during its 2003/4 season. In 1924 he traveled to Vienna to study with Prof. Hans Gבl and with A. Rozsa. With these teachers he studied both conducting and composition. Kaminski returned to Berlin and began to perform as a concert soloist. He was widely acclaimed by the German press. In 1926, after the death of his mother, Esther Rachel Kaminska, who was dubbed the Mother of Yiddish Theatre, Kaminski returned to Warsaw and was appointed the conductor of the Jewish Theatre Orchestra, under the administration of his sister, Ida Kaminska. During this period, as his acclaim as a gifted composer grew, he wrote primarily theatrical music for the Jewish Theatre and the Vilna Company, and songs based on German lyrics. He founded the Warsaw Quartet (which he managed and lead), a quartet that successfully held numerous performances. In 1934, the Warsaw Quartet won the prestigious Pilsudski Prize as the best ensemble in Poland. After winning the prize, the new Warsaw Radio Orchestra accepted the quartet, and Kaminski became the head violinist, despite the ranting of the anti-Semitic press. During this period he often performed as a soloist and played the first performance of the Violin Sonata by Morris Ravel, who was present this performance. In 1937, he was invited by Bronislav Huberman to join the Palestine Orchestra (today Israel PO) as the lead violinist, a position he maintained until his retirement in 1969, as well as guest soloist and conductor. In addition, he founded a quartet that regularly performed throughout the country. Kaminiski had a special contract with Habima Theatre and composed music for their plays, such as Tale of a Prince, and many more. In 1939 he composed the piece Fable and Dance for a string quartet, a piece based primarily on Hasidic melodies. In 1940, Kaminiski composed the Concertino for trumpet and SO. This work is very unique and is regularly performed throughout the world. The piece was dedicated to the trumpet player Kצnigsberg and premiered at the Philharmonic, conducted by the composer. In 1942, Kaminski composed a piece named Aliyah (Immigration), six variations on the theme of Maoz Tzur, each characterizing the immigration from a different country. The sixth variation, a funeral march is played in memory of the victims of Holocaust. But at the very end a voice bursts forth (baritone soloist), singing the wonderful verses by Yehudah HaLevy “Zion, will thou not ask the welfare of thine prisoners”. In 1943, Kaminski composed the Ballad for harp and orchestra, a piece very successful in Europe and the US. In 1945, Kaminski composed the String Quartet, which won the Engel Prize. From 1947 to 1949, during the War of Independence, Kaminski composed the Concerto for violin and orchestra, awarded the Engel Prize in 1950. In 1958, the Philharmonic Orchestra performed the Israel Sketches during its tour in the US and the Far East. In 1960, the Philharmonic Orchestra commissioned a piece with Israeli character for their performances in the United States. Kaminski composed the Symphonic Overture for SO, which won the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra Prize. Joseph Kaminski died in 1972.
   
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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2015, 12:51:50 pm »

Ami Maayani- Divertimento


From the collection of Karl Miller


http://www.mediafire.com/download/1ol804r3y5m630q/maayani.zip

Divertimento
Israeli Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra
ORTF, Eugene Bigot, conductor
Possibly December 22, 1956
NOTE: 650 edits!


\

Wikipedia Bio:

Ami Maayani (born January 1936)[1] is an Israeli composer.[2] The founder and conductor of the Israel National Youth Orchestra, the Tel Aviv Youth Orchestra, the Haifa Youth Orchestra and the Technion Symphony Orchestra, from 1970–1973 and 1976–1980 he was the chairman of the Israel Composers' League. Of note is Maayani's Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra, Qumran and Serenade in D.[3][4][5] Zvi Keren in his book Contemporary Israeli music: its sources and stylistic development (1980) said "The works of Ami Maayani, which have formed a continuation and extension of this school, have a style which might be described as post-Eastern-Mediterranean."[6] The American Organist said, "The lush improvisatory elements and Arabic modal influences in the music of Ami Maayani complement the pandiatonic polyphony of Yuval Rabin. Sabin Levi, on the other hand, employs minimalism and Sephardic folklore."[7]

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« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2015, 12:53:38 pm »

Ödön Partos- Viola Concerto No. 2

From the collection of Karl Miller

http://www.mediafire.com/download/g9hqbdisyzuyn61/partos.zip

Viola Concerto No. 2
Kibbutz Orchestra
Conductor, Unknown


Bio from Wikipedia

artos was born in Budapest (at that time, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire) and studied at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music, together with Antal Doráti and Mátyás Seiber, studied the violin with Jenő Hubay and composition with Zoltán Kodály. Upon completing his studies, he was accepted to the position of Principal Violinist in an orchestra in Lucerne, after which he played in other European orchestras, among them, in Berlin. In 1934, following Hitler’s ascendance to power, Partos returned to his birthplace, Budapest, where he was Principal Violinist in the Budapest Symphony Orchestra|city’s symphony orchestra.

In 1936, Bronisław Huberman founded the Palestine Orchestra (now: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra), for which he recruited Jewish musicians cast out of Europe's orchestras. Huberman sought to include Partos, though the latter's take-up of the post was delayed due to a prior commitment – a contract with the government of the USSR through which Partos taught violin and composition in the Conservatory of Baku, Azerbaijan. In 1937, Partos left the USSR, after having refused to join the Communist Party during the period of the Moscow Trials. He returned to Budapest, where he served as the orchestra’s Principal Violinist along with making concert tours of European countries.
At that time, Bronisław Huberman invited Partos to a meeting in Florence, where he offered him the position of Principal Violist in the Palestine Orchestra. Declining attractive offers from South America (notably, Peru), Partos immigrated to British Mandatory Palestine in 1938.

Between the years 1938–1956, Partos was the principal of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra's viola section, as well as playing numerous solo performances in Israel and abroad. In 1946, together with cellist László Vincze, he founded the Samuel Rubin Israel Academy of Music (now: Buchmann-Mehta School of Music) in Tel Aviv, and in 1959 was instrumental in founding the Thelma Yellin High School [1] of Art in Tel Aviv. In 1951, Partos was appointed director of the Rubin Academy, a position he was to hold until his death (although the state of his health during his last five years of life prevented him from taking an active part in the Academy's administration, a position filled by Prof. Arie Vardi who succeeded him as director there).

Ödön Partos is regarded as among the most important Israeli composers. He was awarded the Israel Prize in 1954, the first honoree in the field of music.
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« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2016, 02:43:40 am »

More Music of Menahem Avidom


from the collection of Karl Miller

http://www.mediafire.com/download/jc1spj4ge1t6cnr/Menahem1.zip
http://www.mediafire.com/download/fup440iqr1rfs40/Menahem2.zip


Symphony No. 1 "Folk Symphony" (1946)
Kol Israel SO
Heinz Freudenthal, conductor

Symphony No. 2 "David" (1948)
Israel Broadcasting Orchestra
Joseph Singer, conductor


Symphony No. 3 "Mediterranean Sonfonietta"
Israel Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra
Eitan Globerzon, conductor

Symphony No. 4. (1955)
Israel Broadcasting Orchestra
Gary Bertini, conductor


Symphony No. 5. "The Song of Eliat" w/soprano (1957)
soprano unknown
Israel Radio SO
Joseph Singer, conductor


Symphony No. 6 (1960)
Israel Broadcasting Orchestra
Jean Martinon, conducter



Symphony No. 7 (1961)

Israel Radio Orchestra
Sergiu Comissiona, conductor


Symphony No. 8 "Festival Sonfonietta" (1966)
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra
Georges Pretre, conductor


Symphony No. 9. "Symphonie Variee for Chamber Orchestra" (1968)
Performers unknown.

Symphony No. 10. "Sinfonia Brevis" (1980)
Israel Broadcasting Orchestra
Israel Edelson, conductor


Flute Concerto (1944)
Guber(?), flute
Kol Israel Orchestra
Shalom Ronly-Riklis, conductor


Short Biography from BachCantatas.com

Menahem Avidom (Composer)

Born: January 6, 1908 - Stanislav, Galicia, then Austro-Hungarian Empire
Died: August 5, 1995 - Tel-Aviv, Israel

Menahem [Menachem] Avidom [Mahler-Kalkstein] was an Israeli composer of Russian birth. His mother was a cousin of Gustav Mahler; his adopted surname combines the word ‘Avi’ (‘father of’) with the initials of his children's names. He studied at the American University in Beirut and at the Paris Conservatoire, where his teachers included Rabaud. In 1925 he emigrated to Palestine, where, in addition to his work as a composer, he served as a music critic, secretary general of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (1945-1952), chair of the Israel Composers' League (1958-1971) and general director of ACUM, the Israeli performing rights society (1955-1980).

In the late 1930s, after writing early works in an Impressionist style, Menahem Avidom turned towards atonal composition. While studying in Beirut and during a four-year stay in Egypt, however, he became deeply influenced by Mediterranean and Asian folk music and French culture. These influences found their expression in arrangements for the Yemenite singer Bracha Zefira (1939), the Flute Concerto (1944), Symphony No. 1 ‘Amamit’ (‘Folk Symphony’, 1945), Symphony No. 3 ‘Yam tichonit’ (‘Mediterranean Sinfonietta’, 1951) and other works. A use of modal scales, folk-like dance rhythms, oriental melodic motifs and orchestration influenced by Ravel and Les Six are characteristic of these works. Symphony No. 2 ‘David’ (1948-1949) depicts the life of the biblical king, while Symphony No. 5 ‘Shirat Eilat’ (‘The Song of Eilat’, 1956-1957) is a combination of a conventional symphonic form and a song cycle.

In the early 1960’s Israeli music began to move away from regionalism towards international styles and techniques. Influenced by these trends, Avidom turned to 12-note procedures. Enigma (1962), a work that imitates electronic effects, displays his interest in sound patterns: the second movement is an inversion of the first, the fourth an inversion of the third and the fifth a recapitulation of the first. The Symphony No. 7 (1960-1961) features a four-note series (A-B-D-mi) that refers to his name. In 1974, for the first Rubinstein Piano Master Competition, Avidom wrote ArtHur ruBinStEin, six inventions based on the series of notes represented in Rubinstein's name (A-H-B-S-E). The last symphony, No. 10 (1981), combines 12-note procedures and oriental melodies. Bachiana (1984-1985), based on B-A-C-H, was written for J.S. Bach's 300th anniversary.

Avidom's first major opera B'khol dor va'dor (‘In Every Generation’, 1953-1954) describes events in Jewish history. Ha'preida (‘The Farewell’, 1971) creates a strangely unreal atmosphere and a convincing expression of complex psychological situations. His historical opera Alexandra ha'khashmonait (‘Alexandra the Hasmonean’, 1955-1956) won the Israel State Prize in 1961.

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« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2016, 02:06:47 am »

Arthur Gelbrun: Concerto-Fantasia for Flute, Harp, and String Orchestra(1963)


From the collection of Karl Miller
http://www.mediafire.com/download/u6qofquun2cgdbc/Gebrun.zip

Brigitte Buxdorf, flute; Catherine Eisenhoffer, harp
Orchestra de la Suisse Romande
Jean-Marie Auberson, conductor


From Jim Moskowitz's Unknown Composers pages.

Another composer of this time was Arthur Gelbrun, born in Warsaw 11 July 1913. He studied at the Warsaw State Conservatory and with Alfred Casella at the Academia Chigiana in Siena. He then returned to Warsaw and played violin and viola with the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra. He went to Switzerland with Radio Lausanne and then became conductor of the Zurich Tonhalle Orchester until 1948. He emigrated to Israel in 1948. Performed as guest conductor of the Israel RSO, the Kibbutz youth choir and the Inter-Kibbutz orchestra. He is now professor of composition and conducting at the Academy of Music, Univ. Of Tel Aviv. His music is primarily romantic with modest use of serialism and new techniques. I personally know very little about his music and have only one composition in my collection; Lamento (from Five Pieces) for Cello Solo, performed by Michael Haran, cello with Alexander Volkov, piano and Ayal Rafiah, percussion on Music from Israel Disc No. MII-CD-7.

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