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You Tube and New Recordings/Record Companies


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Author Topic: You Tube and New Recordings/Record Companies  (Read 1145 times)
Dundonnell
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« on: December 18, 2012, 02:16:51 am »

Not sure if this is the right place for this observation but.........

A friend has recently been in London for a discussion with the boss of one of Britain's most famous specialist record labels regarding a possible future recording project.

The gentleman in question (whom I would be unwise to name publicly) told my friend that the entire record industry is teetering on the edge of a financial abyss. Any or all of the smaller record labels could go under very soon in the present economic climate.

And what-he says-is Killing the Industry is You Tube downloading Roll Eyes

Now...I pass this on without further comment, except to say that I guess most if not all of us remain committed to buying cds first and foremost. But-please-be aware as we (and I very much include myself in this) clamour for new recordings of this or that piece of music that the current outlook is very, very gloomy Sad Sad Sad
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kyjo
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 02:24:12 am »

This is indeed very disturbing news, Colin Sad! Yes, YouTube's accessibility and no-charge downloads are reasons why so many people (myself included) make use of it. I do not feel that all the blame for this should fall on YouTube, it being one of my favorite websites besides, of course, this forum. But if YouTube's success means the smaller record companies' downfall, I'll fight for the little guys!
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2012, 01:15:12 am »

As a demonstration of putting my money where my mouth is  Grin

.....I am going to order the Delos cd of Lowell Liebermann's Symphony No.2 for New Year even though I have the download of the same orchestra and conductor(Dallas SO/Andrew Litton).
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kyjo
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2012, 01:18:44 am »

Good for you, Colin Smiley

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t-p
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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2012, 06:56:38 am »

Listening on youtube has many minuses. Quality of sound is not very good on my computer than on stereo. Also often they don't play until the end.

I find youtube to be a good tool, but not really a substitute to a good recording.
Also one canít listen to youtube while driving the car.

Most of my friends buy recordings ( I have friends that collect classical  CDs and read recommendations in magazines).


Youtube is a tool to just have some idea about the piece.
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shamus
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2012, 09:42:59 am »

I can't apologize for liking YouTube, the variety is amazing and there are tons of obscure pieces if you look hard enough. And being old and low income, I can no longer buy CDs like I used to. I would guess that I have spent over $30,000 (probably more) in the last 40 years on LPs, then Cassettes, then CDs, so I have done quite a lot to support the recording industry up to now, t'would seem. If I find mp3 albums that are reasonable I can buy those, but only rarely can I spend $25 on a new CD. So, sites like this are wonderful to me and I can sometimes offer something up as a thank you for all the great stuff the rest of you put up. So, politically correct or not, I love YouTube. Jim
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2012, 12:03:16 pm »

As someone now retired (at least, officially Grin) and certainly no longer being paid to work, I can fully understand that position. I can no longer afford to buy cds in the numbers I once did. I reckon that over the last 20 years-since I started collecting cds-my average monthly purchase was around 10 cds per month. So that works out at about £35.000(or $48.000). So the record companies haven't done too badly from me either Grin

It sometimes "amuses" me to be criticised (as I have been elsewhere) for stating that I prefer to buy a very wide-range of orchestral music rather than multiple sets of a particular piece. I was told that it was perfectly possible to do both, ie to have 20 versions of "The Ring" or Mahler's 5th Symphony AND to buy lots of obscure music.

Yes, it IS.....IF you have a lot more money than I have EVER had Roll Eyes
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JimL
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2012, 03:02:54 pm »

YouTube is very often the place to hear (or download) works that have had live performances that were recorded, but no CD performance.  However, very often the videos will have a split in the middle of a movement that would necessitate a lot of annoying splicing in a joiner/splitter program.  I prefer to pay for downloads where I can.  $0.99 a track isn't so bad.
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Grandenorm
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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2012, 10:05:19 pm »

I never download from Youtube. Too often the sound is poor anyway. Where it is invaluable is in being able to access music which has not been commercially recorded. I would guess, however, that the real threat to the industry is not from those of us who may download the odd piece of classical repertoire. We're in a minority. But from the largescale downloading of popular music, which is where the big companies used to make most of their money, which then allowed them to subsidise their classical releases somewhat - whether this financial model is still a reality or not I don't know.
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kyjo
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« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2012, 10:12:12 pm »

Agree with you 100%, Gareth Smiley

As I have said before, I do not believe that all the blame for this problem should fall on YouTube-it is just that classical music in general is suffering due to the overt popularity of "popular" music.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2012, 01:16:59 am »

Yes....and the downloading of popular music (rather than buying the stuff on disc) has certainly seriously affected the larger companies and has inhibited them from recording as much classical music as was once the case.

I must confess that I cannot see how You Tube downloading can really be affecting the likes of Chandos, Hyperion or Dutton Huh

The essential hard truth is though that, for whatever combination of reasons, the smaller companies appear to be in fairly desperate straits Sad
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Leea25
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« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2012, 11:06:03 am »

I download an awful lot of music from youtube, but as the quality is often pretty dire, all it does is give me a chance to 'preview' pieces before buying them. I always buy the ones I really like so I can hear them properly. I'm not sure it's the downloading of obscure classical music from youtube which is causing the record companies trouble - much more likely, the enormous amount of illegal pop music downloading, as Colin mentions.

I hope I'm not being over-optimistic when I say that I think the sort of people who are likely to be investing in unusual and obscure composers are people like us, who have a genuine interest in music and will buy what they like anyway. Just my two-pence worth. Smiley
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nigelkeay
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« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2012, 05:53:58 pm »

Is it possible that there's confusion between streaming and downloading here? Or am I just being pedantic in mentioning this? Certainly there's a distinction as far as royalty collection and the performing rights societies (PRS) are concerned. Certain musicians have complained about the meagre return in royalties from youtube. I'm guessing that one stream is seen by the PRS as the equivalent of one listener listening via a radio broadcast. I've read recently that there's software to save a stream to disk (haven't used it myself), but if there's nothing left stored on one's HD after quitting youtube then it's not a download, no?

I can think of good reasons why one might want to use the extra saving to disk software, as in the case of a rare performance where it wasn't certain that the recording was sure to stay on youtube, so catch it while you can.

Youtube is also a search engine, so who doesn't (producing music) want to be visible there?
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dhibbard
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« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2013, 06:48:30 pm »

Not sure if this is the right place for this observation but.........

A friend has recently been in London for a discussion with the boss of one of Britain's most famous specialist record labels regarding a possible future recording project.

The gentleman in question (whom I would be unwise to name publicly) told my friend that the entire record industry is teetering on the edge of a financial abyss. Any or all of the smaller record labels could go under very soon in the present economic climate.

And what-he says-is Killing the Industry is You Tube downloading Roll Eyes

Now...I pass this on without further comment, except to say that I guess most if not all of us remain committed to buying cds first and foremost. But-please-be aware as we (and I very much include myself in this) clamour for new recordings of this or that piece of music that the current outlook is very, very gloomy Sad Sad Sad


the classical recording market has been depressed for a long time now.. esp. with the advent of Naxos CDs.. and how many versions do we need of Beethovens/Mozart/Tchaikovsky symphonies anyway??     See Tower Records, etc, etc.
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rkhenderson
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« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2013, 11:17:00 am »

I was wondering if "crowdfunding" might be a way for works by little-known composers to receive recordings. This means that people pledge amounts to have a work recorded, if enough people are
interested in a given work and it can raise enough funds, it might make it economically viable for even
an amateur group to record a piece. I can think of plenty pieces, I would pledge to see recorded!
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